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A third opinion has been suggested both by learned theologians and by geologists, and on grounds independent of one another -- viz., that the days of the Mosaic creation need not be understood to imply the same length of time which is now occupied by a single revolution of the globe, but successive periods each of great extent; and it has been asserted that the order of succession of the organic remains of a former world accords with the order of creation recorded in Genesis. This assertion, though to a certain degree apparently correct, is not entirely supported by geological facts, since it appears that the most ancient marine animals occur in the same division of the lowest transition strata with the earliest remains of vegetables, so that the evidence of organic remains, as far as it goes, shows the origin of plants and animals to have been contemporaneous: if any creation of vegetables preceded that of animals, no evidence of such an event has yet been discovered by the researches of geology. Still there is, I believe, by no sound critical or theological objection to the interpretation of the word day' as meaning a long period.' Archdeacon Pratt also summarily rejects this view as untenable:

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以下のとおりお答えします。(この文章も最後が完結しないのかもしれませんが、これもまた、そのまま訳しておきます。) 3番目の見解は、博学の神学者および地質学者の両者によって、しかも互いに無関係の土俵上で示唆されました。ー すなわち、モーゼの創造の日々は現在地球の一回転で占められている時間と同じ長さを意味すると了解される必要はなく、それぞれが大きな広がりを持つ継続的期間であり、また、先行世界の有機的遺物の継続順位が創世記に記録された創造の順序と一致することが主張されました。 この主張は、外見上ある程度は正確ですが、全然、地質学の事実によって支援されるとは限りません。野菜の中で最も初期の遺物を含んだ最下段推移層と同じ区割りに、最古代の海洋動物が発生しているように見えるので、その結果有機的遺物の証拠は、そこに限っては、動植物の起源が同時であったことを示しています。もし、何らかの野菜の創造が動物のそれに先行したとするなら、そのような出来事の証拠は地質学の研究によってはまだ発見されていません。それでもまだ、長い期間を意味する単語「日」の解釈に対する、欠陥のない批判的神学的な反対(論)のあることを私は信じます。 副司教プラットもまた即座に、この見解を支持できないものとして拒絶しています: 以上、ご回答まで。

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