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長文を日本語に訳してください!(2)

よくわからないので、よろしくお願いします。 For twenty years Tom raced and gambled, philandered with the prettiest girls, danced, ate in the most expensive restaurants, and dressed beautifully. He always looked as if he had just stepped out of a bandbox. Though he was forty-six you would never have taken him for more than thirty-five. He was the most amusing companion and though you knew he was perfectly worthless you could not but enjoy his society. He had high spirits, and unfailing gaiety, and incredible charm. I never grudged the contributions he regularly levied on me for the necessities of his existence. I never lent him fifty pounds without feeling that I was in his debt. Tom Ramsay knew everyone and everyone knew Tom Ramsay. You could not approve of him, but you could not help liking him. Poor George, only a year older that his scapegrace brother, looked sixty. He had never taken more than a fortnight's holiday in the year for a quarter of a century. He was in his office every morning at nine-thirty and never left it till six. He was honest, industrious, and worthy. He had a good wife, to whom he had never been unfaithful even in thought, and four daughters to whom he was five to a little house in the country where he proposed to cultivate his garden and play golf. His life was blameless. He was glad that he was growing old because Tom was growing old too. He rubbed his hands and said. 'It was all very well when Tom was young and good-looking, but he's only a year younger than I am. In four years he'll be fifty. He won't find life so easy then. I shall have thirty thousand pounds by the time I'm fifty. For twenty-five years I've said that Tom would end in the gutter. And we shall see how he likes that. We shall see if it really pays best to work or be idle.' Poor George! I sympathized with him. I wondered now as I sat down beside him what infamous thing Tom had done. George was evidently very much upset. 'Do you know what's happened now?' he asked me. I was prepared for the worst. I wondered if Tom had got into the hands of the police at last. George could hardly bring himself to speak. 'You're not going to deny that all my life I've been hardworking, decent, respectable, and straightforward. After a life of industry and thrift I can look forward to retiring on a small income in gilt-edged securities. I've always done my duty in that state of life in which it has pleased Providence to place me.' 'True.' And you can't deny that Tom has been an idle, worthless, dissolute, and dishonourable rogue. If there were any justice he'd be in the workhouse. 'True.' George grew red in the face. 'A few weeks ago he became engaged to a woman old enough to be his mother.And now she's died and left him everything she had. Half a million pounds, a yacht, a house in London, and a house in the country.' George Ramsay beat his clenched fist on the table. 'It's not fair, I tell you, it's not fair. Damn it, it's not fair.' I could not help it. I burst into a shout of laughter as I looked at George's wrathful face, I rolled in my chair, I very nearly fell on the floor. George never forgave me. But Tom often asks me to excellent dinners in his charming house in Mayfair, and if he occasionally borrows a trifle from me, it is merely from force of habit. It is never more than a sovereign.

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  • 回答No.2

エキサイト翻訳サイトにて。 http://www.excite.co.jp/world/english/ 20年間、トムは、美しく競走をして、ばくちを打って、最もきれいな少女と共に恋をあさって、踊って、最も高価なレストランで食事して、装いました。 彼は、いつも円筒形ボール箱からちょうど踏んだところだったように見えました。 彼は46歳でしたが、あなたは彼を35以上に一度も連れて行ったことがないでしょう。 彼は最もおもしろい仲間でした、そして、彼が完全に価値がないのを知っていましたが、あなたは彼の交際を楽しまざるを得ませんでした。 彼には、気炎、絶えることない快活、および信じられない魅力がありました。 私は彼が彼の存在の必需品のために定期的に私に徴収した貢献を決してねたみませんでした。 私が彼の負債でいたと感じていなくて、私は50ポンドを彼に貸すことがありませんでした。 トム・ラムゼーは皆を知っていました、そして、皆はトム・ラムゼーを知っていました。 彼に賛成できませんでしたが、あなたは彼が好きであらざるを得ませんでした。 貧しいジョージ、ほんの1歳より年上である、それ、彼のやくざ者兄弟であって、見る、60 彼は四半世紀のために1年間1回以上の2週間の休日を一度も取ったことがありませんでした。 彼は、毎朝、9-30には彼のオフィスにいて、6時までそれを決して出発しませんでした。 彼は、正直で、勤勉で、ふさわしかったです。 彼には、良妻、および彼が彼の庭を耕作して、ゴルフをするよう提案した国の小さい家への5歳であった4人の娘がいました。(その良妻にとって、彼は考えでさえ一度も不誠実であったことがありませんでした)。 彼の人生は非の打ちどころがありませんでした。 彼は、トムがまた、老いていたので、老いていたのがうれしかったです。 彼は、もみ手して、言いました。 'トムが若くて、顔立ちが良かったときに、それは非常にすべて良かったのですが、彼は私より1歳若いだけです'。 4年間で、彼は50歳になるでしょう。 彼は、その時、人生がとても簡単であることがわからないでしょう。 私には、3万ポンドが50歳であるまでにあるつもりです。 25年間、私は、トムが溝に終わると言っています。 そして、私たちは彼がどうそれが好きであるかを見るでしょう。 '私たちは、それが働いているか、または活動していなくなるように本当に儲けが多いかどうかを見るでしょう'。かわいそうなジョージ! 私は彼に同情しました。 トムが彼の横のどんな悪名高いことをしたかに座ったとき、私は、今や、不思議に思いました。 ジョージは明らかにたいへん動揺していました。 'あなたは、何が現在起こったかを知っていますか?'彼は私に尋ねました。 私は最もひどく用意をしました。 私は、トムがついに警察の手に入ったかどうかと思いました。 ジョージは、話すために自分をほとんど連れて来ることができませんでした。 'あなたは、その一生私が勤勉で、きちんとしていて、立派で、正直であることを否定しないでしょう'。 産業と倹約の人生の後に、ギルト・エッジ債でささやかな収入をもらって退職するのを楽しみにすることができます。 '私は私を置くとプロビデンスが喜ばせたその階級でいつも義務を果たしていました'。'本当に'。そして、あなたは、トムが活動していなくて、価値がなくて、ふしだらで、不名誉な悪党であることを否定しない場合があります。 何か正義があれば、彼はワークハウスにいるでしょうに。 '本当に'。ジョージは表面で赤くなりました。 '彼は、数週間前に、現在の彼女が死なせた彼のmother.Andである年取った女性と婚約するようになって、彼女が持っていたすべてを彼に残しました'。 '50万ポンド、ヨット、ロンドンの家、および国の家'。ジョージ・ラムゼーは彼の握りこぶしをテーブルに打ちました。 '私は、それが公正でないとあなたに言って、それは公正ではありません'。 'ちくしょう、それは公正ではありません'。私はそれを助からせることができませんでした。 ジョージの激怒している顔を見たとき、私は、笑いの叫び声に乱入して、私はやたら金をいすを稼いで、私はもう少しで床に落ちるところでした。 ジョージは私を決して許しませんでした。 しかし、トムはメイフェアの彼のチャーミングな家でしばしば素晴らしい夕食に私を招きます、そして、彼がほんの少し私から時折借りるなら、それは単に習慣の力からあります。 それは主権者より決して多くはありません。 ----------------------------- ※1 後はご自身でうまく整理してね。 ※2 試験とかのの解答に使っては……なので、あえてアヤフヤにしておきます。

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回答ありがとうございます。でも、この翻訳機とか使ってよくわからなかったから質問したんです。試験に使うわけでもないので、ちゃんと理解したいです。

関連するQ&A

  • 長文を日本語に訳してください!(2)

    よくわからないので、よろしくお願いします。翻訳機ではないものでお願いします。 For twenty years Tom raced and gambled, philandered with the prettiest girls, danced, ate in the most expensive restaurants, and dressed beautifully. He always looked as if he had just stepped out of a bandbox. Though he was forty-six you would never have taken him for more than thirty-five. He was the most amusing companion and though you knew he was perfectly worthless you could not but enjoy his society. He had high spirits, and unfailing gaiety, and incredible charm. I never grudged the contributions he regularly levied on me for the necessities of his existence. I never lent him fifty pounds without feeling that I was in his debt. Tom Ramsay knew everyone and everyone knew Tom Ramsay. You could not approve of him, but you could not help liking him. Poor George, only a year older that his scapegrace brother, looked sixty. He had never taken more than a fortnight's holiday in the year for a quarter of a century. He was in his office every morning at nine-thirty and never left it till six. He was honest, industrious, and worthy. He had a good wife, to whom he had never been unfaithful even in thought, and four daughters to whom he was five to a little house in the country where he proposed to cultivate his garden and play golf. His life was blameless. He was glad that he was growing old because Tom was growing old too. He rubbed his hands and said. 'It was all very well when Tom was young and good-looking, but he's only a year younger than I am. In four years he'll be fifty. He won't find life so easy then. I shall have thirty thousand pounds by the time I'm fifty. For twenty-five years I've said that Tom would end in the gutter. And we shall see how he likes that. We shall see if it really pays best to work or be idle.' Poor George! I sympathized with him. I wondered now as I sat down beside him what infamous thing Tom had done. George was evidently very much upset. 'Do you know what's happened now?' he asked me. I was prepared for the worst. I wondered if Tom had got into the hands of the police at last. George could hardly bring himself to speak. 'You're not going to deny that all my life I've been hardworking, decent, respectable, and straightforward. After a life of industry and thrift I can look forward to retiring on a small income in gilt-edged securities. I've always done my duty in that state of life in which it has pleased Providence to place me.' 'True.' And you can't deny that Tom has been an idle, worthless, dissolute, and dishonourable rogue. If there were any justice he'd be in the workhouse. 'True.' George grew red in the face. 'A few weeks ago he became engaged to a woman old enough to be his mother.And now she's died and left him everything she had. Half a million pounds, a yacht, a house in London, and a house in the country.' George Ramsay beat his clenched fist on the table. 'It's not fair, I tell you, it's not fair. Damn it, it's not fair.' I could not help it. I burst into a shout of laughter as I looked at George's wrathful face, I rolled in my chair, I very nearly fell on the floor. George never forgave me. But Tom often asks me to excellent dinners in his charming house in Mayfair, and if he occasionally borrows a trifle from me, it is merely from force of habit. It is never more than a sovereign.

  • 長文を日本語に訳してください!(1)

    よくわからないので、よろしくお願いします。  When I was a very small boy I was made to learn by heart certain of the fables of La Fontaine, and the moral of each was carefully explained to me. Among those I learnt was The Ant and the Grasshopper, which is devised to bring home to the young the useful lesson that in an imperfect world industry is rewarded and giddiness punished. In this admirable fable (I apologize for telling something which everyone is politely, but inexactly, supposed to know) the ant spends a laborious summer gathering its winter store, which the grasshopper sits on a blade of grass singing to the sun. Winter comes and the ant is comfortably provided for, but the grasshopper has an empty larder : he goes to the ant and begs for a little food. Then the ant gives him her classic answer : 'What were you doing in the summer time?' 'Saving your presence, I sang, I sang all days, all night.' 'You sang. Why, then go and dance.' I could not help thinking of this fable when the other day I saw George Ramsay lunching by himself in a restaurant. I never saw anyone wear an expression of such deep gloom. He was staring into space. He looked as though the burden of the whole world sat on his shoulder. I was sorry for him : I suspected at once that his unfortunate brother had been causing trouble again. I went up to him and held out my hand. 'How are you?' I asked. 'I am not in hilarious spirits,' he answered. 'Is it Tom again?' He sighed. 'Yes, it is Tom again.' 'Why don't you chuck him?You've done everything in the world for him. You must know by now that he's quite useless.' I suppose every family has a black sheep. Tom had been a sore trial to his for twenty years. He had begun life decently enough: he went into business, married, had two children. The Ramsays were perfectly respectable people and there was every reason to suppose that Tom Ramsay would have a useful and honourable career. But one day, without warning, he announced that he didn't like work and that he wasn't suited for marriage. He wanted to enjoy himself. He would listen to no expostulations. He left his wife and his office. He had a little money and he spent two happy years in the various capitals of Europe. Rumours of his doings reached his relations from time to time and they were profoundly shocked. He certainly had a very good time. They shook their heads and asked what would happen when his money was spent. They soon found out: he borrowed. He was charming and unscrupulous. I have never met anyone to whom it was more difficult to refuse a loan. He made a steady income from his friends and he made friends easily. But he always said that the money you spent on necessities was boring; the money that was amusing to spend was the money you spent on luxuries. For this he depended on his brother George. He did not waste his charm on him. George was a serious man and insensible to such enticements. George was respectable. Once or twice he fell to Tom's promises of amendment and gave him considerable sums in order that he might make a fresh start. On these Tom bought a motor-car and some very nice jewellery. But when circumstances forced George to realize that his brother would never settle down and he washed his hands of him, Tom, without a qualm, began to blackmail him. It was not very nice for a respectable lawyer to find his brother shaking cocktails behind the bar of his favourite restaurant or to see him waiting on the boxseat of a taxi outside his club. Tom said that to serve in a bar or to drive a taxi was a perfectly decent occupation, but if George could oblige him with a couple of hundred pounds he didn't mind for the honour of the family giving it up. George paid.

  • 英文を日本語に訳して、()に入る文も答えてください

    When he was a little boy, George Washington was given a hatchet for his birthday. Eager to try his shiny new tool, George went out and practiced chopping on one of his father`s cherry trees. When the tree was found dead, George was asked by his father ( 1 ). "I can`t tell a lie, Pa; you know I can`t tell a lie. I cut it with my hatchet." Instead of being angry, George`s father was delighted by his son`s honesty. "Run to my arms, you dearest boy," he cried, and then embraced his son. This is the story almost all Americans know about George Washington. On the face of it, it is merely a children`s tale with a moral message: it is good to tell the truth. ( 2 ), for some reason, this seemingly simple story has become one of the myths that hold Americans together. ・(1) (1)why he had told him a lie (2)how to cut his cherry tree (3)if he had done it (4)what he had used to cut his cherry tree ・(2) (1)Therefore (2)However (3)Indeed (4)As a result

  • 回答No.1
noname#222486
noname#222486

20年、トムはレースを賭け、踊ってきれいな女の子とphilandered、最も高価なレストランで食べた、美しく飾ることとなりました。 彼はいつも彼はバンドボックスから出てきたかのように見えた。 彼は四十六ていたが、より三五よりも彼を撮影したことはない。 彼は完全にあなたが彼の社会を楽しむことができる価値を知っていたが、彼が最も面白い仲間だった。 彼は、意気揚々としていたし、陽気と、信じられないほどの魅力を尽きることのない。 私は決して彼が定期的に自分の存在の必要性を私に課せ貢献を渋った。 私は決して私が借金していたことを感じることなく、彼に50ポンドを貸してくれた。 トムRamsayさんは誰もが知っており、誰もがトムRamsayさんを知っていた。 あなたは彼の承認ができませんでしたが、あなたは彼を好きにはいられませんでした。 貧しい人々ジョージは、それ以上の年齢の年だけ、彼の困り者の弟は60を見ていることを確認します。 彼は世紀の4分の1年に二週間の休暇以上の撮影はなかった。 彼は、9時半に毎朝彼のオフィスにいた6時まで、それを離れることはなかった。 彼は、勤勉、誠実かつ価値だった。 彼は彼が彼の庭や遊びのゴルフを育成するために提案国の小さな家と五買い上げ御心に適う、思想でも浮気をされていなかった4人の娘にするには、良い妻を持っていた。 彼の人生は潔白だった。 彼はトムが古すぎる成長していたので、彼は老いていたことを喜んでいた。 彼は手をこすり、と述べた。 'これは、トムはハンサム若いころ、とてもよくすべてだったが、彼は今年は私より若いです。 4年間で彼は、五十でしょう。 彼はとても簡単にその後の人生を見つけることができません。 私は私は50いる時間で30万ポンドをしなければならない。 二十五年間、私はトムがガターに終わることを言っている。 そして、我々は彼が好きかを参照してくださいしなければならない。 それは本当に最高の作業をしたり、アイドル状態に支払えば、我々は、を参照してくださいしなければならない。' 貧しい人々ジョージ! 私は彼と一緒に共感。 私は、悪名高いことトムが何をしたのか彼のそばに座って、私が今疑問に思いました。 ジョージは明らかに非常に怒っていた。 'あなたは今何が起こったかを知っていますか?' 彼は私に尋ねた。 私は最悪の事態に調製した。 トムは最後に警察の手に持っていた場合、私は疑問に思いました。 ジョージはほとんど話をする自分自身を持って来ることができる。 'あなたは否定するつもりはないことを私は、まともな、立派な、勤勉で簡単にしてきたすべての私の人生。 業界や倹約の生活後、私は金縁の有価証券の少ない収入で引退を楽しみにして調べることができます。 私はいつもそれがプロビデンスは私を置くことを嬉しくている人生のその状態で自分の義務をやった。' 'Trueを返します。' そして、あなたはトムが、価値のない、ふしだらな、アイドル、不名誉な不正をされていることを否定することはできません。 任意の正義があった場合、彼は労役場にいるかもしれない。 'Trueを返します。' ジョージは顔を真っ赤になった。 '数週間前に彼は女性に十分な彼mother.And今、彼女が死んだだと彼に彼女が持っていたすべてを任せておくにして歳従事されるようになった。 50万ポンド、ヨット、ロンドンの家、国の家' ジョージラムゼイテーブルの上に自分の握りこぶしを破った。 'これは、私はあなたを教えてフェアではない、それは公正ではない。 ちくしょう、それは公正ではない。' 私はそれを助けることができなかった。 私はジョージさんの怒りに満ちた顔を見て、私は笑いのコメントわっ、私は椅子にロールバック、私は非常に近く、床に落ちた。 ジョージは決して私を許した。 しかし、トムは、しばしば、メイフェアの彼の魅力的な建物に優れてディナーに私を求める彼は時折少し私から金を借りるなら、それは習慣の力からだけです。 それは決して主権を超えています。

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回答ありがとうございます。でも日本語訳の文章が理解できないところがあります。難しいです。

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  • 16-1日本語訳

    お願いします。  It was the summer of 327 BCE,and Ambhi,king of Taxila,was not a happy camper.For one thing,Taxila was no longer as powerful and wealthy as it had been when the Persians ruled there.He was glad the Persians had gone,of course.Every once in a while,they'd send someone around asking for taxes,but as long as he paid them,the Persians pretty much left King Ambhi and his people alone.Nevertheless,he probably wished that the powerful Persians army was still in town.He could have used its help.Taxila's neighbor to the southeast,King Porus,was a brave and intelligent man who wanted Ambhi's kingdom for himself.  Still,the gossip was that the Persian army itself had fallen on hard times.Some young Greek felkow named Sikander had popped up out of nowhere-Macedonia,actually,but that was as good as nowhere-and was busily conquering the whole world.The rumor was that this Sikanddr character had never lost a battle.Of course,you couldn't believe everything you heard.A young boy still in his 20s couldn't possibly have conquered everything from the Nile River to Afghanistan,not to mention the mighty Persians-but still...the stories might be true.  King Ambhi's heart must have sunk when a messenger arrived with news of the horrible defeat of one of Taxila's neighbors.When the Greek Sikander and his troops had arrived in his kingdom,the neighboring king had foolishly tried to fight.But resistance had been futile.Not only had the king lost,but his city had been burned and looted.And that,the messenger would have told King Ambhi,was no rumor.He'd seen the terrible scene himself.Now Sikander's army was on the move again.Next stop:Taxila.  For one desperate moment,King Ambhi must have wished that he and his people could somehow jump out of Sikander's way.And then he realized that,in a way,they could.

  • 英語 日本語にあうように( )内を並べ替えて下さい

    私は彼にそれは正しいと思うかどうかたずねた。 I asked (him/he/if/it/right/thougt/was). その男たちは少年たちに彼の犬に近寄らないように言った The man (to/away/the boys/fron/ordered/keep)his dog. その城には、ひとつの銀のスプーンも残されていなかった。 There was (left/a/spoon/not/single/silver). 彼が約束を破るような人でないことは皆知っている。 Everyone knows that he (break/his/last/parson/the/to/would be)promise. 会えばいつも彼の事を思い出してしまう。 We (being/him/meet/never/of/remeinded/without). 見せて頂けますか。 Could I (a/at/have/it/book)? 飛行機なら1時間半で北海道へ行けますよ。 Jet planes (to Hokkaido/you/to/in/travel/enable)one and a half hours. ちょっと地図を見ればどこにいるのかわかるでしょう。 (map/a glance/you/the/tell/at/will) where you are. 私が部屋に入ると、なぜあなたはいつも緊張するの。 (you/what/every/nervous/so/time/makes)Iwalk into the room? 彼の努力のおかげでその企画は完成した。 It was(his effort/was/the project/that/due to)completed. ようやくその時になって彼の言おうとしていることが分かったのだ。 Only then (he/did/meant/I/what/had/understand).

  • 長文ですがどなたか翻訳をお願いします。

    翻訳できる方がいらっしゃいましたらよろしくお願いします。 The school he went to was dictatorial and wealthy. It was an elaborate artistic building. Possibly one that was founded by a Princess or named after a Princess and bore her image, or arms, or monument and dedication in the building. It was not a school that will appear in the annals of history though, or ever be famous, nothing special. But it was well thought of in the local community and a school to aspire towards there. So I suppose you could say he had a good schooling in that respect. A school that may have had a traditional outlook. In his schooldays he gained physical health and strength. Though his in his early years he was not so strong. As a pupil he has a good memory, but was introspective, and held himself back not always doing the best he could have done in his lessons. His family would have helped him as much as they could at school, and to get a good education. but he may later have forgotten the help he owes to them. He would have had musical or singing ability; good at history, gambling. politics, figures and sports. Town planning and technical drawing. Once he adapted to the school he got well with the other children and way of life. At school he was an achiever, who adapted to change, and began to find a little of his adult charisma and ability to succeed, so was bound eventually to get on at whatever he chose to do. He also became proficient there in making excuses and telling lies to extricate himself from difficult or punishing situations.

  • 日本語に訳してください

    翻訳をお願いします。 He has very few characteristic mannerisms of his own. Little to draw attention to himself... He is absent minded indolent and low spirited in the mornings. His energy levels fluctuate with his mood. He has a stiffness in posture of the back on rising from his seat, but he has no particular characteristics mannerisms to describe. He rubs or scratches the ear occasionally. May move his feet for no reason. But no habitual mannerisms. He does not exhibit much outer self confidence or command in his manner, that’s not to say he doesn’t have it, just it doesn’t show. But he has a kind of muted quite refinement about him, and is generally well disposed towards others. He is never offensive or unapproachable in manner. He is more unobtrusive Kindly when approached. He stays on the edges and doesn't exert himself. He often gives the impression of being mentally else where, of not paying attention to the moment, not very focused.. There is little to draw attention to him. So with his quite demeanor, he tends to blend into the background.

  • 英語の問題について

    古い英文学なのですが、この物語の中の父親の人物像について、どのようなものだと書かれていますか? 書かれている部分とその意味を教えてください。 Father made a great point of our getting down to breakfast on time. I meant to be prompt, but it never occurred to me that I had better try to be early. My idea was to slide into the room at the last moment. Consequently, I often was late. My brothers were often late, too, with the exception of George. He was the only thoroughly reliable son Father had. George got down so early, Father pointed out to me, that he even had time to practise a few minutes on the piano. The reason George was so prompt was that he was in a hurry to see the sporting page before Father got hold of the newspaper, and the reason he then played the piano was to signal to the rest of us, as we dressed, which team had won yesterday’s ball game. He had made up a code for this purpose, and we leaned over the banisters, pulling on our stockings and shoes, to hear him announce the results. I don’t remember now what the titles were of the airs he selected, but the general idea was that if he played a gay, lively air it meant that the Giants had won, and when the strains of a dirge or lament floated up to us, it meant that Pop Anson had beaten them. As Father didn’t approve of professional baseball, we said nothing to him about this arrangement. He led his life and we led ours, under his nose. He took the newspaper away from George the moment he entered the room, and George said good morning to him and stepped innocently into the parlour. Then, while Father watched him through the broad doorway and looked over the political headlines, George banged out the baseball news for us on the piano. Father used to admonish him with a chuckle not to thump it so hard, but George felt that he had to. We were at the top of the house, and he wanted to be sure that we’d hear him even if we were brushing our teeth. George always was thorough about things. He not only thumped the piano as hard as he could but he hammered out the tune over and over besides, while Father impatiently muttered to himself, “Trop de zèle.” Upstairs, there was usually some discussion as to what kind of news George was sending. He had not been allowed to learn popular tunes, which it would have been easy for us to recognize, and the few classic selections which were available in his little music-book sounded pretty much alike at a distance. George rendered these with plenty of goodwill and muscle but not a great deal of sympathy. He regarded some of the rules of piano-playing as needlessly complicated. The fact remained that he was the one boy who was always on time, and Father was so pleased by this that he bought a watch for him with “George Parmly Day, Always on Time” engraved on the back. He told me that as I was the eldest he had meant to give me a watch first, and he showed me the one he had bought for me. It was just like George’s except that nothing had been engraved on it yet. Father explained that to his regret he would have to put it away for a while, until I had earned it by getting down early to breakfast. Time went on, without much improvement on my part. Dawdling had got to be a habit with me. Sometimes my lateness was serious. One morning, when breakfast was half over and I had nothing on but a pair of long woollen drawers, Father called up from the front hall, napkin in hand, that he wouldn’t stand it and that I was to come down that instant. When I shouted indignantly that I wasn’t dressed yet, he said he didn’t care. “Come down just as you are, confound it!” he roared. I was tempted to take him at his word, but thought there might be some catch in it and wouldn’t, though I hurried, of course, all I could. Father ate his usual hearty breakfast in a stormy mood, and I ate my usual hearty breakfast in a guilty and nervous one. Come what might, we always ate heartily. I sometimes wished afterward that I hadn’t, but it never seemed to hurt Father.

  • 日本語訳を!!

    お願いします (5) Although he was still an inexperienced teenager, Octavius was suddenly a public figure. He would soon be plunged into the cutthroat world of Roman politics. His mother and stepfather saw how dangerous this could be. They tried to persuade him to stay away from Rome. But Octavius was determined, and he set out to claim his inheritance. As a first step, he took his adoptive father's name and combined it with his own birth name. He became Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus. (6) Rome, meanwhile, was in the hands of Caesar's deputy, Mark Antony. He had seen the assassination and moved quickly to grab power. Octavian was not yet in Rome, so Antony delivered Caesar's funeral oration. His speech helped to persuade people that the dictator's assassins were the enemies of Rome. With lightning speed, Antony took over Caesar's money, property, and all of his official papers. (7) This was not what Caesar had wanted. In his will, he promised a generous gift of money to every Roman citizen. But Antony refused to honor the murdered hero's wish. (8) When Octavian reached Rome, he honored his great-uncle by giving his own money to the citizens. With the help of Cicero's speeches and with Caesar's veterans marching behind him, Octavian earned the support of the Senate. Not only was he elected to the Senate, he also became a consul─even though, according to Roman law, he was too young to hold these offices. Octavian bragged about it when he later wrote his memoirs.