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英文を日本語に訳して、()に入る文も答えてください

When he was a little boy, George Washington was given a hatchet for his birthday. Eager to try his shiny new tool, George went out and practiced chopping on one of his father`s cherry trees. When the tree was found dead, George was asked by his father ( 1 ). "I can`t tell a lie, Pa; you know I can`t tell a lie. I cut it with my hatchet." Instead of being angry, George`s father was delighted by his son`s honesty. "Run to my arms, you dearest boy," he cried, and then embraced his son. This is the story almost all Americans know about George Washington. On the face of it, it is merely a children`s tale with a moral message: it is good to tell the truth. ( 2 ), for some reason, this seemingly simple story has become one of the myths that hold Americans together. ・(1) (1)why he had told him a lie (2)how to cut his cherry tree (3)if he had done it (4)what he had used to cut his cherry tree ・(2) (1)Therefore (2)However (3)Indeed (4)As a result

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<訳例> 幼い少年の頃、ジョージ・ワシントンは彼の誕生日に手斧をプレゼントされました。 彼の光る新しい道具をためしたいと思って、ジョージは出かけて、彼の父の桜の木の1本をたたき切る練習をしました。 木が枯れてしまったのがわかった時、ジョージは彼の父から彼がそれをしたのかどうか尋ねられました。「父さん、僕は、嘘をつけません; 嘘をつけないってわかってるよね。 僕は、それを僕の手斧で切りました。」 怒る代わりに、ジョージの父は、彼の息子の正直さを喜びました。 「いい子だ、私の腕の中に飛び込んでおいで」と、彼は叫びました、そして、彼の息子を抱きしめました。 これは、ほとんどすべてのアメリカ人がジョージ・ワシントンについて知っている物語です。 見たところ、それは:真実を述べることはよいことだと言う、単に道徳的な教訓を含んだ子供向けの話に過ぎません。 しかし、何らかの理由で、この一見単純な物語は、アメリカ人を団結させる神話の1つになりました。 <設問> (1) (3) if he had done it (2) (2) However

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