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チャップリンの自伝の文章なのですが、日本語訳をお願いします。 I saw Frank Tinney again on the stage a few years later and was shocked, for the comic Muse had left him. He was so self-conscious that I could not believe it was the same man. It was this change in him that gave me the idea years later for my film Limelight. I wanted to know why he had lost his spirit and his assurance. In Limelight the case was age; Calvero grew old and introspective and acquired a feeling of dignity, and this divorced him from all intimacy with the audience.

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  • 回答No.1

数年後にフランク・ティニーの舞台を再度見たのだが、驚きを禁じ得なかった。喜劇の女神はすでに彼を見捨てていたからだ。フランクは大層自意識過剰な様子で、これが同じ人間とは到底思えなかった。彼のこうした変貌振りが数年後、私の映画『ライムライト』の着想となったのだ。何故彼はあれ程まで精気と自身失ってしまったのか。『ライムライト』が描くテーマは年齢だ。カルヴェロは年老いて内向的になることで、尊厳を獲得する。ただそれによって大勢の観客が抱いていた親愛の情からは遠ざかってしまった。

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質問者からの補足

ご回答ありがとうございます。 とても参考になりました。 1つ質問させていただきたいのですが、"the case was age"の部分に関して、 前文のwhyを受けての理由として、ライムライトの中では年齢だった、という ことかなと思っていたのですが、「『ライムライト』が描くテーマは年齢だ」と されているのは、この解釈であっていますでしょうか?

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    お願いします (17) Patriotic writers like Livy took great pride in telling about brave Horatius and how he stopped the foreign attackers. Livy knew that the story was exaggerated and that his first-century readers wouldn't completely believe it. But he wasn't telling it to get the facts straight. He told it because it painted a picture of Roman courage at its best. Horatius represented the “true Roman.” (18) Even though Rome had abolished kingship, the Senate had the power to appoint a dictator in times of great danger. This happened in 458 BCE when the Aequi, an Italic tribe living west of Rome, attacked. The Senate sent for Cincinnatus, a farmer who had served as a consul two years earlier. The Senate's messengers found him working in his field and greeted him. They asked him to put on his toga so they might give him an important message from the Senate. Cincinnatus “asked them, in surprise, if all was well, and bade his wife, Racilia, to bring him his toga.... Wiping off the dust and perspiration, he put it on and came forward.” than the messengers congratulated Cincinnatus and told him that he had been appointed dictator of Rome.

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    お願いします (25) In spite of his poor health, Augustus lived to be 76 years old and reigned for 41 years as emperor. In the last years of his life, he realized that he must choose a successor. But whom? His beloved grandsons had both died young. With only one logical choice left, Augustus summoned his stepson Tiberius to Rome. He named this gloomy man as his co-ruler and successor. (26) In 14 CE, Augustus took a last journey by sea. He caught a chill in the night air and became quite ill. He called Tiberius to his bedside and spoke with him for a long time in private. Then, on August 19, knowing that the end was near, he called for a mirror and had his hair carefully combed. The biographer Suetonius tells the story: “he summoned a group of friends and asked ‘Have I played my part in the comedy of life believably enough?’” Then he added lines from a play: If I have pleased you, kindly show Appreciation with a warm goodbye. (27) Augustus Caesar had played many roles well: the dutiful heir of Julius Caesar; the victor over Antony; the reformer of Roman government; the generous sponsor of literature and art;and, in his final years, the kindly father figure of Rome─providing food, entertainment, and security to his people. Near the end of his life, he remembered: “When I was 60 years old, the senate, the equestrians, and the whole people of Rome gave me the title of Father of my Country and decreed that this should be inscribed in the porch of my house.” (28) When Augustus died, all Italy mourned, and the Senate proclaimed him a god. His rule marked a turning point in history. In his lifetime, the Roman Republic came to an end. but he rescued the Roman state by turning it into a system ruled by emperors─a form of government that survived for another 500 years. In an age in which many rules were called “saviors” and “gods,” Augustus Caesar truly deserved to be called the savior of the Roman people.

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    お願いします (21) During his own lifetime, Cicero was known as a great statesman, orator, and man of action. But he died a bitterly disappointed man. He had failed to do what he most wanted to accomplish: to save the Roman Republic. Not even Cicero's enemies, though, could doubt his love for Rome. Plutarch, writing many years after Cicero's death, tells a story about Octavian─after he had risen to great power as the emperor Augustus Caesar. The emperor found his grandson reading a book written by Cicero. Knowing that his grandfather had agreed to let Mark Antony's soldiers murder Cicero, “The boy was afraid and tried to hide it under his gown. Augustus...took the book from him, and began to read it.... When he gave it back to his grandson, he said,‘My child, this was a learned man, and a lover of his country.’”

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  • 回答No.3

タイプミスを発見しましたので合わせてお詫び訂正致します。 何故彼はあれ程まで精気と自身失ってしまったのか。 → 何ゆえに彼は、あれ程まで精気と自信を失ってしまったのか。

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  • 回答No.2

>1つ質問させていただきたいのですが、"the case was age"の部分に関して、 前文のwhyを受けての理由として、ライムライトの中では年齢だった、という ことかなと思っていたのですが、「『ライムライト』が描くテーマは年齢だ」と されているのは、この解釈であっていますでしょうか? In Limelight the case was age; という文章は The case in Limelight was age; の倒置です。 何故ならこの文章ではこうしたほうが語呂が心地よ良いからに他なりません。 その説明がセミダッシュ以下に綴られているわけですね。 無論私が表現したかったことが、正にあなたのおっしゃる 『ライムライトの中では年齢だった』 に合致しているものと確信致して居ります。

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質問者からのお礼

詳しくご説明いただき、ありがとうございました! 大変参考になりました。 また、#3の訂正につきましても、感謝致します。

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