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Another British attack at Bullecourt was planned after the failure of 11 April but postponed several times until the Third Army further north, had reached the Sensée and there had been time for a thorough artillery preparation. By May the attack was intended to help the Third Army to advance, hold German troops in the area and assist the French army attacks on the Aisne. Two divisions were involved in the attack with the first objective at the second Hindenburg trench on a front of 4,000 yards (3,700 m), a second objective at the Fontaine–Quéant road and the final objective at the villages of Riencourt and Hendecourt. Many of the British transport and supply difficulties had been remedied, with the extension of railways and roads into the "Alberich" area. The attack began on 3 May, part the 2nd Australian Division reached the Hindenburg Line and established a foothold. Small parties of the 62nd Division reached the first objective and were cut off, the division having c. 3,000 casualties; an attack by the 7th Division was driven back.

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>Another British attack at Bullecourt was planned after the failure of 11 April but postponed several times until the Third Army further north, had reached the Sensée and there had been time for a thorough artillery preparation. By May the attack was intended to help the Third Army to advance, hold German troops in the area and assist the French army attacks on the Aisne. ⇒ブレクールでのもう一つの英国軍の攻撃が4月11日の失敗の後に計画されたが、第3方面軍がずっと北の「サンセ」(妥当な線)に達するまで数回延期されたので、完全な砲兵隊準備のための時間があった。5月までには、第3方面軍の攻撃は進軍の一助として地域のドイツ軍隊を抑え、エーンに対するフランス軍の攻撃の援助を意図するようになった。 >Two divisions were involved in the attack with the first objective at the second Hindenburg trench on a front of 4,000 yards (3,700 m), a second objective at the Fontaine–Quéant road and the final objective at the villages of Riencourt and Hendecourt. Many of the British transport and supply difficulties had been remedied, with the extension of railways and roads into the "Alberich" area. ⇒2個師団が、4,000ヤード(3,700m)幅の前線を持つ第2ヒンデンブルク塹壕における最初の標的、フォンテーヌ-ケアン道における第2の標的、それとリヤンクールおよびエンドクール村における最終標的の攻撃に関与した。「アルベリヒ」地域に乗り入れる鉄道や道路の延長で、英国軍の輸送と供給困難の多くは改善された。 >The attack began on 3 May, part the 2nd Australian Division reached the Hindenburg Line and established a foothold. Small parties of the 62nd Division reached the first objective and were cut off, the division having c. 3,000 casualties; an attack by the 7th Division was driven back. ⇒攻撃は、5月3日に始まって、第2オーストラリア師団の一部がヒンデンブルク戦線に到着して足場を確立した。第62師団の数個小隊が最初の標的に達したけれども、あっさり切り捨てられた。それで師団としては、約3,000人の犠牲者を被った。また、第7師団による攻撃は追い返されてしまった。

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