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The Germans in Longueval made a determined defence but by 10:00 a.m. the 9th Scottish Rifles had taken their objectives, except the north end and a strong point in the south-east of the village, which resisted until attacked with support from the 7th Seaforth and the 5th Cameron Highlanders at 5:00 p.m. It proved impossible to capture Waterlot Farm in the second position so positions were taken in Longueval Alley, in touch with the 18th Division. At 9:00 a.m., the 9th Division HQ was erroneously informed that the village had been captured but by then the captured part of the village had been consolidated; a source of water was found before the Germans could counter-attack.

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  • Nakay702
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>The Germans in Longueval made a determined defence but by 10:00 a.m. the 9th Scottish Rifles had taken their objectives, except the north end and a strong point in the south-east of the village, which resisted until attacked with support from the 7th Seaforth and the 5th Cameron Highlanders at 5:00 p.m. It proved impossible to capture Waterlot Farm in the second position so positions were taken in Longueval Alley, in touch with the 18th Division. ⇒ロングヴァルのドイツ軍は確固とした防備体制を敷いていたが、午前10時までに第9スコットランドライフル隊が、村の北端と南西部の強化地点を除いて、その標的を奪取した。そこでは、第7シーフォース隊と第5キャメロン・ハイランダー隊からの支援を受けた(英国軍旅団の)攻撃が行われる午後5時まで抵抗していた。第2陣地のワーテルロー農場を占拠することは不可能であると分かったので、第18師団との接触を保って、ロングヴァル・アレイ(奥地)に陣地をとった。 >At 9:00 a.m., the 9th Division HQ was erroneously informed that the village had been captured but by then the captured part of the village had been consolidated; a source of water was found before the Germans could counter-attack. ⇒午前9時、第9師団司令部は、村が占拠されたとの誤報を出したが、しかし、その時点では村の一部が占拠されただけで、その部分が統合された状況だった。ドイツ軍の反撃が可能となる前に、誤報の出所が判明した。

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  • 回答No.2

訂正です。 9th Scottish Rifles を中隊規模としましたが「大隊」のようでした。 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameronians_(Scottish_Rifles) 訂正訳 ロンジバルのドイツ軍は防備を固めていたが午前10時までにスコットランドライフル連隊第9大隊が目標として占拠した。村の北端と、強固な陣地のある南西はまだであった。そこでは、シーフォース連隊第7大隊とキャメロン・ハイランダー連隊第5隊からの支援を受けて攻撃を行う午後5時まで抵抗があった。 第2戦線のワーテルロー農場をこれ以上占拠することは不可能であるとわかり、第18師団と接するロンジバル小路に陣地を構えた。 午前9時、第9師団司令部は村を占拠し終えたとの誤報を出した。その時点では村の一部を占拠し、それが集まりつつある状態だった。誤報の元はドイツ軍が反撃可能となる前に判明した。

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  • 回答No.1

ロンジバルのドイツ軍は防備を固めていたが午前10時までにスコットランドライフル連隊第9隊(*)が目標として占拠した。村の北端と、強固な陣地のある南西はまだであった。そこでは、シーフォース連隊第7隊とキャメロン・ハイランダー連隊第5隊から支援を受けて攻撃を行う午後5時まで抵抗があった。 第2戦線のワーテルロー農場をこれ以上占拠することは不可能であるとわかり、第18師団と接するロンジバル小路に陣地を構えた。 午前9時、第9師団司令部は村を占拠し終えたとの誤報を出した。その時点では村の一部を占拠し、それが集まりつつある状態だった。誤報の元はドイツ軍が反撃可能となる前に判明した。 *) Scottish Rifles 英国軍では地域固有の連隊名があるようです。番号名がついても1か、2なので、9thはその配下の部隊のことと思われました。1個連隊は3~5大隊のため、中隊の単位番号または連隊内で臨時編成した部隊番号かと思います。

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