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和訳 We have seen that, to the savage, the world which lies beyond the community to which he belongs-i.e. beyond his group and the groups associated with it on terms which are friendly rather than hostile- is a world strange and mysterious, peopled with beings whom he hates or fears as his deadly foes. He thinks of them as belonging to an order other than his own, as less or, it may be, as more than human; and he looks upon them as absolutely rightless, for the sphere of rights is codeterminous with the sphere within which he himself lives. As regards himself, life is possible for him only within the little circle of his community. 未開人にとって彼が属する共同体の向こうにある世界とは ――すなわち彼の集団や敵対よりむしろ友好的である諸集団の向こうにあるその世界とは――、 彼が嫌い、執念深い敵と恐れる存在で満たされる奇妙で神秘的な世界であると私たちは理解してきた。 未開人はそうした存在を自分とは別の秩序に属するものと考える。 そして未開人はそうした存在を完全に権利のないものとみなす。 権利の及ぶ範囲は、彼自身が暮らす階層と共同決定?(codeterminous with)であるからである。 彼自身について、生活はその共同体の小さな輪の中でだけ可能である。 自分の訳に自信がもてません。 1.「on terms」以下をどのように訳すのでしょうか 3.「as less or, it may be, as more than human」をどのように訳すのでしょうか。

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  • 英語
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  • ベストアンサー
  • 回答No.2
  • tjhiroko
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We have seen that, to the savage, the world which lies beyond the community to which he belongs-i.e. beyond his group and the groups associated with it on terms which are friendly rather than hostile- is a world strange and mysterious, peopled with beings whom he hates or fears as his deadly foes. 「未開人にとって彼が属する共同体の向こうにある世界とは―すなわち、彼の集団や、その集団とは敵対関係というよりむしろ友好関係にある諸集団の向こうにある世界とは―未知の神秘的な世界であり、極めて危険な敵として彼が嫌ったり恐れたりする生き物が住んでいる世界である、ということが分かった」 strange を「未知の」にし、as his deadly foes をhates or fears の両方にかけました。 He thinks of them as belonging to an order other than his own, as less or, it may be, as more than human; and he looks upon them as absolutely rightless, for the sphere of rights is codeterminous with the sphere within which he himself lives. As regards himself, life is possible for him only within the little circle of his community. 「未開人はそうした存在を自分とは別の等級に属するものと考え、人間以下、あるいはまた人間以上のものとして考える。そして未開人はそうした存在をまったく権利を持たないものとみなす。権利の及ぶ領域は、彼自身がその中で暮らしている領域との相互関係で決まるからだ。彼自身に関しては、生活はその共同体の小さな輪の中だけで可能なのだ」 codeterminous ですが、co-determine という動詞としての使用例は検索するとかなりありますので、その形容詞形ということでしょう。で、co-determine は、共同で決まる(決める)とか、相互関係で決まるとか、そういった意味のようです。 分かりやすい例としてこんなのがありました。 >Brain and culture co-determine each other これは共同で決めるというよりは、お互いに作用し合って互いを決めている、ということでしょう。

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質問者からのお礼

>strange を「未知の」 生半可な日本語訳の固定概念にふりまわされて 文意が取れない悪癖がどうしても直りません。 丁寧にご教示いただき、誠にありがとうございました。

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  • 回答No.1
  • SPS700
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>>1.「on terms」以下をどのように訳すのでしょうか on terms 「~という関係にある」という意味ですから、お示しの訳でいいと思います。  「敵対関係というよりはむしろ友好関係にあると考えられる集団との連携の、向こうにある世界」 >>3.「as less or, it may be, as more than human」をどのように訳すのでしょうか。 「かれ(未開人)は、彼ら(未知の世界の住人)が、人類以下か、あるいは人類より勝れたものか、それは分からないが、とにかく自分たちとは別種のものと考える。」 ここの order 下記の12番、あるいは13番の「目」に近い、分類学的な見方だと思います。 http://eow.alc.co.jp/order/UTF-8/ 2。がありませんが、coterminous with 「境界を同じくする」「同じ範囲にある」「同じ」。余計ですが下記には誤解を招くような訳もあります。  http://eow.alc.co.jp/conterminous/UTF-8/  「権利の及ぶ範囲は、彼自身の生活圏と同範囲であるからである。」  総じていい訳をなさっていると思います。

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質問者からのお礼

>総じていい訳をなさっていると思います。 拙訳に対して、まことに紅顔のいたりに存じます。 ありがとうございました。

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