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The Battle of the Lys (7–29 April 1918), also known as the Lys Offensive, the Fourth Battle of Ypres, the Fourth Battle of Flanders and Operation Georgette (Portuguese: Batalha de La Lys and French: 3ème Bataille des Flandres), was part of the 1918 German offensive in Flanders during World War I, also known as the Spring Offensive. It was originally planned by General Ludendorff as Operation George but was reduced to Operation Georgette, with the objective of capturing Ypres, forcing the British forces back to the channel ports and out of the war. In planning, execution and effects, Georgette was similar to (although smaller than) Operation Michael, earlier in the Spring Offensive.The German attack zone was in Flanders, from about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) east of Ypres in Belgium to 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) east of Béthune in France, about 40 kilometres (25 mi) south. The front line ran from north-north-east to south-south-west. The Lys River, running from south-west to north-east, crossed the front near Armentières in the middle of this zone. The front was held by the Belgian Army in the far north, by the British Second Army (under Plumer) in the north and centre and by the British First Army (under Horne) in the south. The German attacking forces were the Sixth Army in the south (under Ferdinand von Quast), and the Fourth Army in the north (under Sixt von Armin). Both armies included substantial numbers of the new stosstruppen, trained to lead attacks with the new stormtroop tactics. The British First Army was a relatively weak force; it included several worn-out formations that had been posted to a "quiet sector". This included two divisions of the Portuguese Expeditionary Corps, which were undermanned, lacked almost half of their officers, had very low morale and were set to be replaced the day of the German attack. The German plan was to break through the First Army, push the Second Army aside to the north, and drive west to the English Channel, cutting off British forces in France from their supply line which ran through the Channel ports of Calais, Dunkirk and Boulogne. Battle of Estaires (9–11 April) The German bombardment opened on the evening of 7 April, against the southern part of the Allied line between Armentières and Festubert. The barrage continued until dawn on 9 April. Operation Georgette ジョルジェット作戦

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>The Battle of the Lys (7–29 April 1918), also known as the Lys Offensive, the Fourth Battle of Ypres, the Fourth Battle of Flanders and Operation Georgette (Portuguese: Batalha de La Lys and French: 3ème Bataille des Flandres), was part of the 1918 German offensive in Flanders during World War I, also known as the Spring Offensive. It was originally planned by General Ludendorff as Operation George but was reduced to Operation Georgette, with the objective of capturing Ypres, forcing the British forces back to the channel ports and out of the war. ⇒「リスの戦い」(1918年4月7日‐29日)は、「リス攻勢」、「第4次イープルの戦い」、「第4次フランドルの戦い」、および「ゲオルゲッテ(ジョルジェット)作戦」(ポルトガル語:Batalha de La Lys「ラ・リスの戦い」、フランス語:3èmeBataille des Flandres「第3次フランドルの戦い」)としても知られるが、1918年の「春の攻勢」としても知られる、第1次世界大戦中のフランドルにおけるドイツ軍の攻撃の一部であった。もともとルードンドルフ将軍が「ゲオルゲ作戦」として計画していたが、イープルを攻略し、英国軍を強制的に港湾に戻し、戦争から撤退させるという目的で、「ゲオルゲッテ(小ゲオルゲ)作戦」に引き下げられたものである。 >In planning, execution and effects, Georgette was similar to (although smaller than) Operation Michael, earlier in the Spring Offensive.The German attack zone was in Flanders, from about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) east of Ypres in Belgium to 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) east of Béthune in France, about 40 kilometres (25 mi) south. The front line ran from north-north-east to south-south-west. The Lys River, running from south-west to north-east, crossed the front near Armentières in the middle of this zone. ⇒「ゲオルゲッテ(ジョルジェット)」は、計画、実行および効果において、「春の攻勢」以前の「ミヒャエル(マイケル)作戦」(よりも小規模であったが)、これと似ていた。ドイツ軍の攻撃地帯は、それより約40キロ(25マイル)南のフランドル、ベルギーのイープル東方約10キロ(6.2マイル)、フランスのベシュネ東方10キロ(6.2マイル)にあった。前線は北北東から南西に走っていた。南西から北東に向かって走っているリス川は、この地帯の中央にあるアルマンチエ付近の前線を横切っていた。 >The front was held by the Belgian Army in the far north, by the British Second Army (under Plumer) in the north and centre and by the British First Army (under Horne) in the south. The German attacking forces were the Sixth Army in the south (under Ferdinand von Quast), and the Fourth Army in the north (under Sixt von Armin). Both armies included substantial numbers of the new stosstruppen, trained to lead attacks with the new stormtroop tactics. ⇒前線は北縁部ではベルギー方面軍により、北部と中央部では英国第2方面軍(プルマー麾下)により、南部では英国第1方面軍(ホーン麾下)によって保持されていた。ドイツの攻撃軍団は、南部の第6方面軍(フェルディナント・フォン・クヮスト麾下)、北部の第4方面軍(シックス・フォン・アーミン麾下)であった。両方面軍には、新しいかなりの人数の突撃班が含まれ、新しい(ナチ)突撃隊の戦術で攻撃を導くように訓練されていた。 >The British First Army was a relatively weak force; it included several worn-out formations that had been posted to a "quiet sector". This included two divisions of the Portuguese Expeditionary Corps, which were undermanned, lacked almost half of their officers, had very low morale and were set to be replaced the day of the German attack. ⇒これとは相対的に、英国第1方面軍は弱い軍団だった。それは「静かな地区」に布陣していた数個の編隊を含んでいた。これには、ポルトガル軍遠征軍団の2個編成隊が含まれていたが、これらの部隊には約半分の人員が欠けていて、士気も極めて低かったので、ドイツ攻撃の(実行)日には置き換えられることになっていた。 >The German plan was to break through the First Army, push the Second Army aside to the north, and drive west to the English Channel, cutting off British forces in France from their supply line which ran through the Channel ports of Calais, Dunkirk and Boulogne. ⇒ドイツ軍の計画では、第1方面軍を突破し、第2方面軍を北に追い払い、西の英国海峡へ進んで、カレー、ダンケルク、ブーローニュの港を通る供給ラインからフランス駐留の英国軍を遮断することになっていた。 >Battle of Estaires (9–11 April) The German bombardment opened on the evening of 7 April, against the southern part of the Allied line between Armentières and Festubert. The barrage continued until dawn on 9 April. ⇒「エステールの戦い」(4月9日-11日) 4月7日の夜、ドイツ軍の砲撃がアーメンチエールとフェスチュベールの間の連合国軍戦線の南側に向かって開始された。集中砲火が4月9日の夜明けまで続いた。

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    Despite the strategic predicament of the German army, it survived the battle, withstood the pressure of the Brusilov Offensive, and conducted an invasion of Romania. In 1917, the German army in the west survived the large British and French offensives of the Nivelle Offensive and the Third Battle of Ypres, though at great cost. Falkenhayn was sacked and replaced by Hindenburg and Ludendorff at the end of August 1916. At a conference at Cambrai on 5 September, a decision was taken to build a new defensive line well behind the Somme front. The Siegfriedstellung was to be built from Arras to St. Quentin, La Fère and Condé, with another new line between Verdun and Pont-à-Mousson. These lines were intended to limit any Allied breakthrough and to allow the German army to withdraw if attacked; work began on the Siegfriedstellung (Hindenburg Line) at the end of September.