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The Battle of Le Transloy was the last offensive of the Fourth Army of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in the 1916 Battle of the Somme in France, during the First World War. The battle was fought in conjunction with attacks by the French Tenth and Sixth armies on the southern flank and the Reserve/5th Army on the northern flank, against Heeresgruppe Rupprecht (Field Marshal Rupprecht of Bavaria) created on 28 August, from the 1st and 2nd armies of the dissolved armeegruppe Gallwitz-Somme and the 6th and 7th armies.

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>The Battle of Le Transloy was the last offensive of the Fourth Army of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in the 1916 Battle of the Somme in France, during the First World War. The battle was fought in conjunction with attacks by the French Tenth and Sixth armies on the southern flank and the Reserve/5th Army on the northern flank, against Heeresgruppe Rupprecht (Field Marshal Rupprecht of Bavaria) created on 28 August, from the 1st and 2nd armies of the dissolved armeegruppe Gallwitz-Somme and the 6th and 7th armies. ⇒第一次世界大戦中の「ル・トランスロイの戦い」は、1916年にフランス「ソンムの戦い」に参戦した英国遠征軍(BEF)第四方面軍の最後の攻撃であった。戦いは、解体されたガルヴィッツ-ソンム方面軍の第1、第2方面軍、および第6、第7方面軍から8月28日に創設されたルプレヒト軍団(バヴァリア〔バイエルン〕の陸軍元帥ルプレヒト麾下)に対して、フランス軍南側面の第十、第六方面軍、および北側面の予備隊/第5方面軍との合同軍形態で行われた。

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    The Battle of Flers–Courcelette (15–22 September 1916) was fought during the Battle of the Somme in France, by the French Sixth Army and the British Fourth Army and Reserve Army, against the German 1st Army, during the First World War. The Anglo-French attack of 15 September began the third period of the Battle of the Somme but by its conclusion on 22 September, the strategic objective of a decisive victory had not been achieved.

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