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The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

"And attempted to forge the will?" I said. She stopped. "What are you saying?" "Does he admit that he tried to forge his mother's will?" "I haven't mentioned anything about a will." "Oh, I thought you had." "But, in fact, that was his sister's accusation. What made you say that? How did you know?" "I must be psychic, I said." She took my arm. I had become a most endearing case history. "You must be psychic indeed," she said. "You must tell me more about yourself. Well, that's the story of my taking up my present profession. When my husband started having these delusions and making these confessions I felt I had to understand the workings of the mind. And I began to study them. It has been fruitful. It has saved my own reason." "Did it ever occur to you that the sister's story might be true?" I said. "Especially as he admits it." She took away her arm and said, "Yes, I considered the possibility. I must admit I considered it well. She saw me watching her face. She looked as if she were pleading some personal excuse. "Oh do," she said, "please take off those glasses." "Why don't you believe his own confession?" "I'm a psychiatrist and we seldom believe confessions." She looked at her watch as if to suggest I had started the whole conversation and was boring her. I said, "He might have stopped seeing eyes if you'd taken him at his word." She shouted, "What are you saying? What are you thinking of? He wanted to give a statement to the police, do you realize...." "You know he's guilty," I said. "As his wife," she said, "I know he's guilty. But as a psychiatrist I must regard him as innocent. That's why I took up the subject." She suddenly turned angry and shouted, "You damned inquisitor, I've met your type before." I could hardly believe she was shouting, who previously had been so calm. "Oh, it's not my business," I said, and took off my glasses to show willing. I think it was then she recognized me. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 過去の回想シーンから現代に戻って、主人公とDr Grayが湖のまわりを一緒に歩きながら話している場面です。 ここでこの物語は終わりになります。 ***************************************************** As his wife," she said, I know he's guilty. But as a psychiatrist I must regard him as innocent. というDr Grayのセリフがあるのですが、 以前に Then there was an accident, one of those psychological accidents. She was a trained dispenser, but she mixed herself the wrong eye-drops. Now it's very difficult to make a mistake like that, normally. But subconsciously she wanted to, she wanted to. But she wasn't normal, she was not normal." とあって、姉は潜在的に盲目になりたくて点眼薬の調合を間違えたのだと思っていたのですが、 結局つまり、姉の点眼薬を別の劇薬にすり替えたのは弟(Dr Grayの夫)だったのか。 最後のオチがよくわからなくなってしまいました。 もしわかるようでしたら教えてください。お願いします。 (英語そのものの質問ではないのでここまで物語を読んでいただいていない方には質問の内容がわからなくて申し訳ないです。) 前文は I had my glasses on again, and was walking on. "How did your husband react to his sister's accusations?" I said. "He was remarkably kind." "Kind?" "Oh, yes, in the circumstances. Because she started up a lot of gossip in the neighbourhood. It was only a small town. It was a long time before I could persuade him to send her to a home for the blind where she could be looked after. There was a terrible bond between them. Unconscious incest." "Didn't you know that when you married him? I should have thought it would have been obvious." She looked at me again. "I had not studied psychology at that time," she said. I thought, neither had I. We were silent for the third turn about the lake. Then she said, "Well, I was telling you how I came to study psychology and practise it. My husband had this breakdown after his sister went away. He had delusions. He kept imagining he saw eyes looking at him everywhere. He still sees them from time to time. But eyes, you see. That's significant. Unconsciously he felt he had blinded his sister. Because unconsciously he wanted to do so. He keeps confessing that he did so." となっています。

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 既に弟が姉を盲にしたことは既成事実、話の終わりは、眼鏡屋(=心理学者の夫)が、母の遺言書を偽造したこと、それは主人公には目撃したから分かっている。  その知識は第六感によると主人公は言いくるめるが、黒めがねの主が、超能力でなく、眼鏡を外せば、過去の黒い所業の目撃者であった、というのが決め手になる。  夫の悪業1(遺言書の偽造)、悪業2(処方をすり替えて姉を盲目に)を、妻としては信じないが心理学者としては信じるという矛盾が、黒めがねを取った目撃者の証言で、片付く、という話でしょう。

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最後、物語を総括していただいてありがとうございました! 弟が姉を盲目にした、ということでいいのですね。 長くかかってようやくラストまで辿りつきました。 大変お世話になり、本当にありがとうございました。 ご解説もいろいろ勉強になったり、なるほどという解釈があったり、英文と物語そのものも奥深く知ることができ、心から感謝いたします。

関連するQ&A

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    I had my glasses on again, and was walking on. "How did your husband react to his sister's accusations?" I said. "He was remarkably kind." "Kind?" "Oh, yes, in the circumstances. Because she started up a lot of gossip in the neighbourhood. It was only a small town. It was a long time before I could persuade him to send her to a home for the blind where she could be looked after. There was a terrible bond between them. Unconscious incest." "Didn't you know that when you married him? I should have thought it would have been obvious." She looked at me again. "I had not studied psychology at that time," she said. I thought, neither had I. We were silent for the third turn about the lake. Then she said, "Well, I was telling you how I came to study psychology and practise it. My husband had this breakdown after his sister went away. He had delusions. He kept imagining he saw eyes looking at him everywhere. He still sees them from time to time. But eyes, you see. That's significant. Unconsciously he felt he had blinded his sister. Because unconsciously he wanted to do so. He keeps confessing that he did so." Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 過去の回想シーンから現代に戻って、主人公とDr Grayが湖のまわりを一緒に歩きながら話している場面です。 ********************************************* 最後の方に He kept imagining he saw eyes looking at him everywhere. He still sees them from time to time. But eyes, you see. とあるのですが、 But eyes, you see.のButはどういう意味になって、この一文はどう訳すのでしょうか? 教えてください。よろしくお願いします。 前文は "It can all be explained psychologically, as we've tried to show to my husband. We've told him and told him, and given him every sort of treatment--shock, insulin, everything. And after all, the stuff didn't have any effect on his sister immediately, and when she did go blind it was caused by acute glaucoma. She would probably have lost her sight in any case. Well, she went off her head completely and accused her brother of having put the wrong drug in the bottle deliberately. This is the interesting part from the psychological point of view--she said she had seen something that he didn't want her to see, something disreputable. She said he wanted to blind the eye that saw it. She said...." We were walking round the lake for the second time. When we came to the spot where I had seen her face reflected I stopped and looked over the water. "I'm boring you." "No, no." "I wish you would take off those glasses." I took them off for a moment. I rather liked her for her innocence in not recognizing me, though she looked hard and said, "There's a subconscious reason why you wear them." "Dark glasses hide dark thoughts," I said. "Is that a saying?" "Not that I've heard. But it is one now." She looked at me anew. But she didn't recognize me. These fishers of the mind have no eye for outward things. Instead, she was "recognizing" my mind:I already came under some category of hers. となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    "Am I boring you?" she said. "No, carry on." "Must you wear those glasses?....it is a modern psychological phenomenon....the trend towards impersonalization ...the modern Inquisitor." For a while, she watched her own footsteps as we walked round the lake. Then she continued her story. "...an optician. His sister was blind---going blind when I first attended her. Only the one eye was affected. Then there was an accident, one of those psychological accidents. She was a trained dispenser, but she mixed herself the wrong eye-drops. Now it's very difficult to make a mistake like that, normally. But subconsciously she wanted to, she wanted to. But she wasn't normal, she was not normal." "I'm not saying she was," I said. "What did you say?" "I'm sure she wasn't a normal person," I said, "if you say so." Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 過去の回想シーンから現代に戻って、主人公とDr Grayが湖の近くを一緒に歩きながら話している場面です。 ------------------------------------------------ ●"I'm not saying she was," I said.というセリフが出てくるのですが、 このセリフはDr Grayの話を今まで聞いていた主人公のセリフと思われます。 I'm not sayingとわざわざ現在進行形にしているところがわかりません。 またshe wasの後はshe was normalと続くのでしょうか? (「私は彼女はノーマルだったと言っていないところです」となるのでしょうか?) "What did you say?"とそのあとDr Grayが言っているので、何か変なことを主人公が言っている感じはするのですが。 教えてください。よろしくお願いします。 前文は After lunch, since the Eng. Lit. people had gone off to play tennis, she tacked on to me and we walked to the lake across the lawns, past the rhododendrons. This lake had once been the scene of a love-mad duchess's death. ".....during the war. Before that I was in general practice. It's strange," she said, "how I came to take up psychology. My second husband had a breakdown and was under a psychiatrist. Of course, he's incurable, but I decided.... It's strange, but that's how I came to take it up. It saved my reason. My husband is still in a home. His sister, of course, became quite incurable. He has his lucid moments. I did not realize it, of course, when I married, but there was what I'd now call an oedipus-transference on his part, and..." How tedious I found these phrases! We had come to the lake. I stooped over it and myself looked back at myself through the dark water. I looked at Dr Gray's reflection and recognized her. I put on my dark glasses, then. となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

     ”You're quite the young lady, Joan," he said, looking at my new breasts.   I smiled and put my hand in my blazer pocket.   He was smaller than he had been two years ago. I thought he must be about fifty or thirty. His face was more freckled than ever and his eyes were flat blue as from a box of paints. Miss Simmonds appeared silently in her soft slippers. "You're quite the young lady, Joan," she said from behind her green glasses, for her right eye had now gone blind and the other was said to be troubling her. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 he=Mr Simmondsは検眼士です。 13歳だった主人公の女の子が2年経って再びSimmondsさんのお店を訪れた場面です。 ----------------------------------- His face was more freckled than ever and his eyes were flat blue as from a box of paints.の his eyes were flat blue as from a box of paintsがわからないのですが、 as fromを辞書で引くと ・・・から(法律・契約など正式な日付に用いる)とありました。 この英文の場合には意味的に当てはまらない感じなのですが どのように訳すのでしょうか? 教えてください。宜しくお願いします。 前文は I broke the glasses by sitting on them during my school holidays two years later.   My grandmother said, after she had sighed, "It's time you had your eyes tested--" "--eyes tested in any case," said my aunt when she had sighed.   I washed my hair the night before and put a wave in it. Next morning at eleven I walked down to Mr Simmonds's with one of my grandmother's long hat-pins in my blazer pocket. The shop front had been done up, with gold lettering on the glass door: Basil Simmonds, Optician, followed by a string of letters which, so far as I remember, were FBOA, AIC, and others. となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    My grandmother said, "Did you see--" "--Mr Simmonds' sister?" said my aunt. "Yes, she was there all the time," I said, to make it definite. My grandmother said, "They say she's going---" "---blind in one eye," said my aunt. "And with the mother bedridden upstairs---" my grandmother said. "---she must be a saint," said my aunt. Presently--it may have been within a few days or a few weeks--my reading glasses arrived, and I wore them whenever I remembered to do so. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 (主人公は13歳の女の子です) Mr Simmonds=検眼士です。 ・ "---she must be a saint," (彼女は聖人であるに違いない?) このセリフはどういう意味ですか? sheはMr Simmonds' sisterのことですか? ☆"眼鏡をかける"、を英文にしたときwearとput onのどちらを使っても違いはないのでしょうか?よく使われるのはwearの方ですか? 前文は "Can you read?" said Mr Simmonds.   I stopped looking round. I said, "Read what?"--for I had been told I would be asked to read row after row of letters. The card which hung beneath the dim light showed pictures of trains and animals.   "Because if you can't read we have pictures for illiterates."  This was Mr Simmonds' joke. I giggled. His sister smiled and dabbed her right eye with her handkerchief. She had been to London for an operation on her right eye.  I recall reading the letters correctly down to the last few lines, which were too small. I recall Mr Simmonds squeezing my arm as I left the shop, turning his sandy freckled face in a backward glance to see for certain that his sister was not watching. となっています。 宜しくお願いします。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

      We went into the examination room. She glided past me and switched on the dim light above the letter card. I began to read out the letters while Basil Simmonds stood with folded hands. Someone came into the front shop. Miss Simmonds slid off to see who it was and her brother tickled my neck. I read on. He drew me towards him. I put my hand into my blazer pocket. He said, "Oh!" and sprang away as the hat-pin struck through my blazer and into his thigh.   Miss Simmonds appeared in the doorway in her avenging white overall. Her brother, who had been rubbing his thigh in a puzzled way, pretended to be dusting a mark off the front of his trousers. "What's wrong? Why did you shout?" she said. "No, I didn't shout." Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 Basil Simmondsは検眼士です。 主人公の女の子が検眼している場面です。 --------------------------------- ●Miss Simmonds appeared in the doorway in her avenging white overall.のin her avenging white overallの個所はどのように意味を理解して読むのでしょうか? avengingは復讐する、という意味ですか? ●Her brother, who had been rubbing his thigh in a puzzled way, pretended to be dusting a mark off the front of his trousers.のpretended to be dusting a mark off the front of his trousersについて教えてください。 pretended to be dusting ~は「~を払っているふりをする」? a markは印を? offはdustingと繋がって意味をとるのでしょうか?(dust a mark offで「印を払う」ですか?) front of his trousersは「彼のズボンの前で」? 教えてください。宜しくお願いします。 前文は I broke the glasses by sitting on them during my school holidays two years later.   My grandmother said, after she had sighed, "It's time you had your eyes tested--" "--eyes tested in any case," said my aunt when she had sighed.   I washed my hair the night before and put a wave in it. Next morning at eleven I walked down to Mr Simmonds's with one of my grandmother's long hat-pins in my blazer pocket. The shop front had been done up, with gold lettering on the glass door: Basil Simmonds, Optician, followed by a string of letters which, so far as I remember, were FBOA, AIC, and others. You're quite the young lady, Joan," he said, looking at my new breasts.   I smiled and put my hand in my blazer pocket.   He was smaller than he had been two years ago. I thought he must be about fifty or thirty. His face was more freckled than ever and his eyes were flat blue as from a box of paints. Miss Simmonds appeared silently in her soft slippers. "You're quite the young lady, Joan," she said from behind her green glasses, for her right eye had now gone blind and the other was said to be troubling her. となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    She looked at me, then returned to attend to the person in the shop, leaving the intervening door wide open. She was back again almost immediately. My examination was soon over. Mr Simmonds saw me out at the front door and gave me pleading unhappy look. I felt like a traitor and I considered him horrible. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 Mr Simmondsは検眼士です。(she=Mr Simmondsの姉) 主人公は15歳ぐらいの女の子です。 --------------------------------- I felt like a traitor とあるのですがtraitorは”裏切り者”でしょうか? (horribleは”ひどく嫌な”?主人公がMr Simmondsをそう思うのはわかるのですが) なぜ主人公が自分のことをそのように感じたのかがわかりません。 前文は :(主人公が検眼にMr Simmondsのお店を訪れた場面です) You're quite the young lady, Joan," he said, looking at my new breasts.   I smiled and put my hand in my blazer pocket.   He was smaller than he had been two years ago. I thought he must be about fifty or thirty. His face was more freckled than ever and his eyes were flat blue as from a box of paints. Miss Simmonds appeared silently in her soft slippers. "You're quite the young lady, Joan," she said from behind her green glasses, for her right eye had now gone blind and the other was said to be troubling her. We went into the examination room. She glided past me and switched on the dim light above the letter card. I began to read out the letters while Basil Simmonds stood with folded hands. Someone came into the front shop. Miss Simmonds slid off to see who it was and her brother tickled my neck. I read on. He drew me towards him. I put my hand into my blazer pocket. He said, "Oh!" and sprang away as the hat-pin struck through my blazer and into his thigh.   Miss Simmonds appeared in the doorway in her avenging white overall. Her brother, who had been rubbing his thigh in a puzzled way, pretended to be dusting a mark off the front of his trousers. "What's wrong? Why did you shout?" she said. "No, I didn't shout." となっています。 教えてください。宜しくお願いします。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    "It can all be explained psychologically, as we've tried to show to my husband. We've told him and told him, and given him every sort of treatment--shock, insulin, everything. And after all, the stuff didn't have any effect on his sister immediately, and when she did go blind it was caused by acute glaucoma. She would probably have lost her sight in any case. Well, she went off her head completely and accused her brother of having put the wrong drug in the bottle deliberately. This is the interesting part from the psychological point of view--she said she had seen something that he didn't want her to see, something disreputable. She said he wanted to blind the eye that saw it. She said...." We were walking round the lake for the second time. When we came to the spot where I had seen her face reflected I stopped and looked over the water. "I'm boring you." "No, no." "I wish you would take off those glasses." I took them off for a moment. I rather liked her for her innocence in not recognizing me, though she looked hard and said, "There's a subconscious reason why you wear them." "Dark glasses hide dark thoughts," I said. "Is that a saying?" "Not that I've heard. But it is one now." She looked at me anew. But she didn't recognize me. These fishers of the mind have no eye for outward things. Instead, she was "recognizing" my mind:I already came under some category of hers. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 過去の回想シーンから現代に戻って、主人公とDr Grayが湖のまわりを一緒に歩きながら話している場面です。 ------------------------------------------------ ●"Dark glasses hide dark thoughts," I said. "Is that a saying?" "Not that I've heard. But it is one now."の個所で、 Is that a saying?のthatは指示代名詞だと思うのですが、Not that I've heard.のthatは接続詞ですか? ●These fishers of the mind have no eye for outward things.のfishersとは何のことですか? 教えてください。よろしくお願いします。 前文は "Am I boring you?" she said. "No, carry on." "Must you wear those glasses?....it is a modern psychological phenomenon....the trend towards impersonalization ...the modern Inquisitor." For a while, she watched her own footsteps as we walked round the lake. Then she continued her story. "...an optician. His sister was blind---going blind when I first attended her. Only the one eye was affected. Then there was an accident, one of those psychological accidents. She was a trained dispenser, but she mixed herself the wrong eye-drops. Now it's very difficult to make a mistake like that, normally. But subconsciously she wanted to, she wanted to. But she wasn't normal, she was not normal." "I'm not saying she was," I said. "What did you say?" "I'm sure she wasn't a normal person," I said, "if you say so." となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    Dorothy was beside us in no time. She peered one-eyed at the glasses, then at me. "Are you constipated?" she said. I maintained silence. But I felt she was seeing everything through her green glasses. "Put them on," Dorothy said. "Try them on," said Basil. They were ganged up together. Everything was going wrong, for I had come here to see how matters stood between them after the affair of the will. Basil gave me something to read. "It's all right now," I said, "but it was all a blur when I tried to read this morning." "Better take a dose," Dorothy said. I wanted to get out of the shop with my glasses as quickly as possible, but the brother said, "I'd better test your eyes again while you're here just to make sure." He seemed quite normal. I followed him into the dark interior. Dorothy switched on the light. They both seemed normal. The scene in the little office last night began to lose its conviction. As I read out the letters on the card in front of me I was thinking of Basil as "Mr Simmonds" and Dorothy as "Miss Simmonds", and feared their authority, and was in the wrong. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 主人公は15歳ぐらいの女の子です。 Basil=検眼士です。 Dorothyは検眼士の姉です。 主人公が検眼のためにBasilの店を訪れている場面です。 -------------------------------------------------------------- 一番最後の As I read out the letters on the card in front of me I was thinking of Basil as "Mr Simmonds" and Dorothy as "Miss Simmonds", and feared their authority, and was in the wrong. の個所の ●I was thinking of Basil as "Mr Simmonds" and Dorothy as "Miss Simmonds"というのは 主人公のどういう心境を表しているのでしょうか? うまく掴めません。 ●and feared their authority, and was in the wrong.のauthority(権威)とはどういう意味なのでしょうか? 小説の前の方から読んでいないとわかりにくいと思いますが、教えてください。宜しくお願いします。 前文は "What are you doing?" she said. He jumped up and pulled the blotting paper over his work. Her one eye through her green glasses glinted upon him, though I did not actually see it do so, but saw only the dark green glass focused with a squint on to his face. "I'm making up the accounts," he said, standing with his back to the desk, concealing the papers. I saw his hand reach back and tremble among them. "I shivered in my soaking wet clothes. Dorothy looked with her eye at the window. I slid sideways to avoid her and ran all the way home. Next morning I said. "I've tried to read with these glasses. It's all a blur. I suppose I'll have to take them back?" "Didn't you notice anything wrong when you tried---" "---tried them on in the shop?" "No. But the shop's so dark. Must I take them back?" I took them into Mr Simmonds early that afternoon. "I tried to read with them this morning, but it's all a blur." It was true that I had smeared them with cold cream first. となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

     Then he took up the pen. I can still smell the rain and hear it thundering about me, and feel it dripping on my head from the bough hanging above me. He raised his eyes and looked out at the rain. It seemed his eyes rested on me, at my station between the tree and the window. I kept still and close to the tree like a hunted piece of nature, willing myself to be the colour of bark and leaves and rain. Then I realized how much more clearly I could see him than he me, for it was growing dark. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 主人公は15歳ぐらいの女の子です。 he=検眼士です。 窓の外から主人公が検眼士の様子を窺っている場面です。 ------------------------------------------ ●It seemed his eyes rested on me, at my station ~・・・ここのmy stationとはどういう意味ですか? ●I kept still and close to the tree like a hunted piece of nature, willing myself to be the colour of bark and leaves and rain.について a hunted piece of natureとはどういう意味ですか? ●Then I realized how much more clearly I could see him than he meについて he meのつながりがわかりません。どう読むのでしょうか? 前文は He did extract one long sheet of paper, and held it up. It was typewritten with a paragraph in handwriting at the bottom on the side visible from the window. He laid it side by side with another sheet of paper which was lying on the desk. I pressed close up to the window, intending to wave and smile if I was seen, and to call out that I was sheltering from the rain which was now coming down in thumps. But he kept his eyes on the two sheets of paper. There were other papers lying about the desk; I could not see what was on them. But I was quite convinced that he had been practising handwriting on them, and that he was in the process of forging his mother's will. となっています。 教えてください。宜しくお願いします。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    "What are you doing?" she said. He jumped up and pulled the blotting paper over his work. Her one eye through her green glasses glinted upon him, though I did not actually see it do so, but saw only the dark green glass focused with a squint on to his face. "I'm making up the accounts," he said, standing with his back to the desk, concealing the papers. I saw his hand reach back and tremble among them. "I shivered in my soaking wet clothes. Dorothy looked with her eye at the window. I slid sideways to avoid her and ran all the way home. Next morning I said. "I've tried to read with these glasses. It's all a blur. I suppose I'll have to take them back?" "Didn't you notice anything wrong when you tried---" "---tried them on in the shop?" "No. But the shop's so dark. Must I take them back?" I took them into Mr Simmonds early that afternoon. "I tried to read with them this morning, but it's all a blur." It was true that I had smeared them with cold cream first. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 主人公は15歳ぐらいの女の子です。 he=検眼士です。she= Dorothyは検眼士の姉です。 窓の外から主人公が検眼士の様子を窺っている場面から始まっています。 ------------------------------------------------------------------ "Didn't you notice anything wrong when you tried---" "---tried them on in the shop?" "No. But the shop's so dark. Must I take them back?"の個所について But the shop's so dark.の部分はBecause ~の意味になると思うのですが、 But~と言うのが普通なのでしょうか? 前文は He pulled a sheet of blotting paper towards him. He dipped his pen in the ink and started writing on the bottom of the sheet of paper before him, comparing it from time to time with the one he had taken out of the safe. I was not surprised, but I was thrilled, when the door behind him slowly opened. It was like seeing the film of the book. Dorothy advanced on her creeping feet, and he did not hear, but formed the words he was writing, on and on. The rain pelted down regardless. She was looking crookedly, through her green glasses with her one eye, over his shoulder at the paper. となっています。 教えてください。宜しくお願いします。