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英文 和訳

英文 翻訳お願いします。 ちなみにEvelyn WaughのMr Loveday's Little Outingという作品です。 A dozen or so variously afflicted lunatics hopped and skipped after him down the drive until the iron gates opened and Mr.Loveday stepped into his freedom. His small trunk had already gone to the station;he elected to walk. He had been reticent about his plans, but he was well provided with money, and the general impression was that he would go to London and enjoy himself a little before visiting his step-sister in Plymouth.

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  • 英語
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  • 回答No.1

面白そうな物語ですね。 こんな感じの訳でどうでしょうか。 鉄の門が開いて、Mr. Loveday が自由な世界に足を踏み出す までの間、12人かそこらの様々な症状の狂人達が彼の後を追って、 ドライブ(=家と門をつなぐ小道)を跳ねたりスキップしたりして ついてきた。 彼の小さなトランクは既に駅にいっていた。彼は歩くことに決めた。 彼は自分の計画に乗り気ではなかったが、お金をたっぷりもらって いたので、周囲の人間は、彼がプリマスにいる義理の姉(妹?)を 訪ねる前にロンドンに行って、少し楽しむのだろうと思っていた。

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