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日本語訳を!c11-4

お願いします!続き Kumar was preparing for his initiation along with some other boys from his class.When that day arrived,his mother and sister plastered the courtyard of their home with a fresh layer of clay mixed with sacred cow manure.Cows were holy,and their manure mixed with clay purified the space needed for the special ritual.(Many harmful bacteria do not grow in cow manure,so this practice actually did keep things clean.Grass fibers in the manure did something else,too,it made the plaster of the walls stronger.)Kumar's family built small,square fire altar in the center of the courtyard with four rectangular fired bricks that his mother and sister also plastered with clay and manure. When everything was ready,Kumar's father and two other priests brought out the special tools to kindle the sacred fire.One man held a wood plank,and a second man held a wooden drill.Kumar's father pulled back and forth on a cord wrapped around the thick wooden drill,so that the drill tip pressed into the wood board.After a few turns,the tip of the stick rtarted to smoke,and soon the charred wood powder that built up in the hearth began to glow.One of the priests blew on the glowing embers and added a bit of dry kindling soaked in butter until the sacred fire-Agni-sprang to life. Once the fire was going,Kumar's father recited a hymn to Agni,inviting the deity to the altar to receive the sacrifice: May your offerings,oblations,directed to heaven Come forth with the butter ladle. Agni goes to the deities,seeking their favor. Having been called,Agni,sit down for the feast.

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クマールは、彼の階級出身の他の男の子たちと一緒に彼の成年式に備えていました。その日が来ると、彼の母親と姉は彼らの家の中庭を神聖な牛糞を混ぜ合わせた粘土の新しい層で塗り固めました。牛は神聖でした、それで、粘土と混ぜ合わせた牛糞は特別な儀式のために必要とされる空間を清めました。(多くの有害なバクテリアが牛糞の中では成長しないので、この慣習はものを実際に清潔にしておきました。 牛糞の中の植物繊維は、また、他のこともしました、それは壁の漆喰をより強くしたのです。)彼の母親と姉が、また、粘土と牛糞で塗り固めた4個の長方形の焼きレンガを使って、クマールの家族は、中庭の中央に小さな、四角い拝火壇を造りました。 すべての準備が整うと、クマールの父親と他の聖職者2名が神聖な火を起こすための特別な道具を出しました。1人の男が木の厚板を持ち、もう一人の男が木製の錐を持ちました。錐の先端が木の板の中へ押し込まれるように、太い木製の錐に巻きつけた紐を、クマールの父親は前後に引っ張りました。2、3度回転した後、棒の先端は煙を出し始め、間もなく、炉の中に積み上がった焦げた木くずが赤熱し始めました。聖職者の1人は赤熱する燃えさしに息を吹きかけ、神聖な火の ― アグニ ― が燃え盛るまで、バターに浸して乾燥させた付け木(点火用のよく燃える木)を少し加えました。 ひとたび火が起こると、クマールの父親はアグニへの賛歌を唱え、生贄を受け取るように祭壇へ神を誘いました: あなた様への供え物、奉納品が天国に向かいますように バターのひしゃくを持ってお出まし下さい。 アグニ様が神のもとに赴き、神々の好意を求めます。 呼ばれております、アグニ様、豪華な食事のためにお座り下さい。

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