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次の英文を和訳してほしいです。

Knowing the ratio of argon-40 to potassium-40 in the mineral and the half-life of decay makes it possible to establish the ages of rocks ranging from millions to billions of years old. この英文を和訳してほしいです。

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   鉱石内のカリウム40に対するアルゴン40の比率、および崩壊の半減期が分かれば、その岩石が何百万年前から何十億年前の間の物かが分かる。

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  • 次の英文を和訳してほしいです。

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  • 和訳をお願いします。

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    訳していただく時に,下の語句を参考にしていただければ幸いです。      Stars emit electromagnetic radiation of different wavelengths. Radio waves have the longest wavelengths and gamma rays the shortest. Our eves are able to see visible light, somewhere in the middle.      Astronomers, the scientists who study the stars, use different sorts of telescopes to study these different wavelengths. In the 1950s, early radio telescopes were built to study the radio waves emitted by stars, using radar technology developed during the Second World War. But gamma rays and X-rays are absorbed by the Earth’s atmosphere, so NASA and other space agencies have launched a number of telescopes into space to study these rays.      A lot of the radiation emitted by ordinary stars is visible light, and astronomers use optical telescopes to study this. The first optical telescopes were built by Dutch spectacle makes around 1600, but the Italian scientist Galileo is famous for being the first astronomer to use a telescope. He studied the moon and discovered some of Jupiter’s moons in 1610. Modern telescopes use a concave mirror to capture light. The bigger the mirror, the more light the telescope can capture. Using a bigger telescope allows us to study fainter objects and see more detail. The history of the optical telescope is a history of a battle to build bigger telescopes with bigger mirrors.      The old English nursery rhyme that begins “Twinkle, twinkle, little star” actually describes an astronomer’s nightmare. Stars appear to twinkle, or shine brightly then weakly, because the light coming from them is disturbed as it travels through the Earth’s atmosphere. This also distorts their images in telescopes. There are two ways of overcoming this distortion. The first is to launch the telescope into space, above the Earth’s atmosphere, but that is very expensive. The Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990 to study visible and infrared light from above the Earth’s atmosphere. It had early problems, but a rescue operation by engineers in 1993 solved most of these and it has sent back to Earth some of the most fantastic images of the universe. It will operate until about 2010 and then be replaced by the James Webb Space Telescope, which is due to be launched in 2011.      The second solution is a new advanced technology called “adaptive optics” in which small moveable mirrors cancel out the distortions caused by the atmosphere. Early experiments have been successful and if this works, astronomers will be able to built Earth-based telescopes with enormous mirrors free from atmospheric distortion.      Some places on Earth are better than others for optical telescopes. Since they are used in the dark, they need clear skies away from cities or other artificial sources of light. Ideal places are between 20 and 40 degrees north or south of the equator on mountains higher than 3,500 meters. Some places where the best modern telescopes are located are Hawaii in the northern hemisphere and Chile in the southern hemisphere. Other ideal locations for telescopes in the future include Antarctica and the moon.      Astronomers these days never actually look through their telescopes. They use sensitive electronic detectors and computers to collect and analyze the light the telescopes pick up. 【語句】 electromagnetic 「電磁気の」 gamma ray 「ガンマ線」 radio telescope 「電波望遠鏡」 distortion 「ゆがみ」 NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) 「(米国の)航空宇宙局」 optical telescope 「光学望遠鏡」 Galileo (Galileo Galilei) 「ガリレオ・ガリレイ (1564-1642)」 Jupiter 「木星」 concave mirror 「凹面鏡」 Hubble Space Telescope 「ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡」 reflector telescope 「反射望遠鏡」 adaptive optics 「波面補償光学」

  • 次の英文を和訳してください。お願いいたします。

    次の英文を和訳してください。お願いいたします。 訳していただく時に,下の語句を参考にしていただければ幸いです。 また翻訳サイトを使わないでいただきたいです。よろしくお願いいたします。      Stars emit electromagnetic radiation of different wavelengths. Radio waves have the longest wavelengths and gamma rays the shortest. Our eves are able to see visible light, somewhere in the middle.      Astronomers, the scientists who study the stars, use different sorts of telescopes to study these different wavelengths. In the 1950s, early radio telescopes were built to study the radio waves emitted by stars, using radar technology developed during the Second World War. But gamma rays and X-rays are absorbed by the Earth’s atmosphere, so NASA and other space agencies have launched a number of telescopes into space to study these rays.      A lot of the radiation emitted by ordinary stars is visible light, and astronomers use optical telescopes to study this. The first optical telescopes were built by Dutch spectacle makes around 1600, but the Italian scientist Galileo is famous for being the first astronomer to use a telescope. He studied the moon and discovered some of Jupiter’s moons in 1610. Modern telescopes use a concave mirror to capture light. The bigger the mirror, the more light the telescope can capture. Using a bigger telescope allows us to study fainter objects and see more detail. The history of the optical telescope is a history of a battle to build bigger telescopes with bigger mirrors.      The old English nursery rhyme that begins “Twinkle, twinkle, little star” actually describes an astronomer’s nightmare. Stars appear to twinkle, or shine brightly then weakly, because the light coming from them is disturbed as it travels through the Earth’s atmosphere. This also distorts their images in telescopes. There are two ways of overcoming this distortion. The first is to launch the telescope into space, above the Earth’s atmosphere, but that is very expensive. The Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990 to study visible and infrared light from above the Earth’s atmosphere. It had early problems, but a rescue operation by engineers in 1993 solved most of these and it has sent back to Earth some of the most fantastic images of the universe. It will operate until about 2010 and then be replaced by the James Webb Space Telescope, which is due to be launched in 2011.      The second solution is a new advanced technology called “adaptive optics” in which small moveable mirrors cancel out the distortions caused by the atmosphere. Early experiments have been successful and if this works, astronomers will be able to built Earth-based telescopes with enormous mirrors free from atmospheric distortion.      Some places on Earth are better than others for optical telescopes. Since they are used in the dark, they need clear skies away from cities or other artificial sources of light. Ideal places are between 20 and 40 degrees north or south of the equator on mountains higher than 3,500 meters. Some places where the best modern telescopes are located are Hawaii in the northern hemisphere and Chile in the southern hemisphere. Other ideal locations for telescopes in the future include Antarctica and the moon.      Astronomers these days never actually look through their telescopes. They use sensitive electronic detectors and computers to collect and analyze the light the telescopes pick up. 【語句】 electromagnetic 「電磁気の」 gamma ray 「ガンマ線」 radio telescope 「電波望遠鏡」 distortion 「ゆがみ」 NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) 「(米国の)航空宇宙局」 optical telescope 「光学望遠鏡」 Galileo (Galileo Galilei) 「ガリレオ・ガリレイ (1564-1642)」 Jupiter 「木星」 concave mirror 「凹面鏡」 Hubble Space Telescope 「ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡」 reflector telescope 「反射望遠鏡」 adaptive optics 「波面補償光学」

  • この英文の和訳お願いします。 難しいです。

    翻訳サイトだと意味がおかしくなるので質問しました。 Later in this book I will describe information gained from other sources. Twelve old people in the sample were kind enough to keep a diary of their activities for a week in the spring of 1955. Four of these diaries are reproduced in an appendix. Special surveys were made of the social and family background of old people seeking help from the social services: a sample group of some 200 people originating in East London who spent the last period of their lives in L.C.C homes; and finally, 400 people being visited by home helps in Bethnal Green. The object of these surveys was, first, to explore the respective functions of relatives and of the social services in helping to meet the needs of old people, and second, to pinpoint those groups who make the heaviest demands on statutory and voluntary provision. In presenting the results I have tried throughout to keep individual people in the forefront. The research worker is so anxious to establish patterns, uniformities, and systems of social action that he is tempted to plan questionnaires that can be filled in simply and to confine his report largely to classificatory lists and tables of statistics. The uniqueness of each individual and each family is probably the fundamental difficulty about this. However those to be studied are selected, whether on grounds of likeness in age, situation, occupation, or class, once one meets them and behavior, relationships, attitude and interpretation. Standard questions, prepared beforehand, mean different things to different people; they are sometimes appropriate, sometimes inappropriate; by themselves they do not provide an adequate means of thoroughly investigating subjects as complex as this. Before one can apply or interpret the reliability of answers to set questions, one needs a fair idea of the most important relationships, activities, and characteristics of each person approached, important, that is, as they are judged by him. Too many of the principal features of social life might otherwise be missed or misrepresented. Although I believe with conviction that the methods of interviewing should be flexible and that reports on social research should convey the quality and diversity of individual and social behavior, I am not suggesting that the search for patterns of behavior, through statistical analysis and correlation, is not important. I am submitting only that once a social inquiry moves beyond simple description and measurement, for instance, of facts of a basically demographic kind, the build-up of statistics and indices of behavior becomes a subtle and complicated process that can only proceed in the context of a wide knowledge of the societies concerned. And such knowledge cannot be gained unless there is direct and continuous acquaintance with the people who are being studied.