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The battle proved to be very costly for both sides. Serbian losses had reached around 10,000 killed and wounded by 23 September. The Bulgarian companies had been reduced to 90 men each and one regiment, the 11th Sliven Regiment, had 73 officers and 3,000 men hors de combat. By strategic aspect, the battle was not a huge success for the Allies due to the upcoming winter that rendered further military engagements almost impossible. Today, there is a small church on the peak of Prophet Ilia where the skulls of dead Serbian soldiers are stored, and it is regarded as a cultural site and is a tourist attraction.

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>The battle proved to be very costly for both sides. Serbian losses had reached around 10,000 killed and wounded by 23 September. The Bulgarian companies had been reduced to 90 men each and one regiment, the 11th Sliven Regiment, had 73 officers and 3,000 men hors de combat. ⇒両陣営にとって、戦いは非常に高くつくことが分かった。セルビア軍の損失は、9月23日までに、死傷者がおよそ10,000人に達した。ブルガリア軍の数個中隊は各々90人の兵士に削減され、そして1個の連隊、(例えば)第11のスリヴン連隊は、戦闘力を失って、(わずかに)73人の将校と3,000人の兵士が所属していた。 >By strategic aspect, the battle was not a huge success for the Allies due to the upcoming winter that rendered further military engagements almost impossible. Today, there is a small church on the peak of Prophet Ilia where the skulls of dead Serbian soldiers are stored, and it is regarded as a cultural site and is a tourist attraction. ⇒戦略的な面では、さらなる交戦をほとんど不可能にする冬の接近のせいで、戦いは連合国軍にとってあまり大きな成功(になりそう)もなかった。今日、プロフェット・イリヤの頂上に小さな教会があってそこに戦死したセルビア軍兵士らの頭蓋骨が保存されているが、それは文化的遺跡と考えられ、観光名所となっている。

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