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Cells generated from a patient are driven to form the tissue that is diseased, enabling biologists in some cases to track the steps by which the disease is developed.                        ”Cloning and Stem Cell Work Earns Nobel"

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  • ddeana
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患者から採取した(※1)細胞はつぎつぎと疾患のある組織を作り出し、症例によっては疾患の進行段階を生物学者が追跡するのを可能にします。 ※1:再生医療やクローニングに関する文献なので、この場合のgenerated fromは自然に体から生まれたものではなく、採取したと訳すのが適当だと考えます。

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  • Him-hymn
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患者から生じた細胞は、病んだ組織を作る方向に進み、生物学者が、病気が進行する段階をたどるのを可能にしてくれる場合もある。 以上で、いかがでしょうか?

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  • bakansky
  • ベストアンサー率48% (3502/7239)

患者から得た細胞を培養すると病変した組織を形成する。対象にもよるけれども、生物学者はその病変が生起する過程を追跡することが出来る。

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