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Visibility early on 16 June was poor and the French heavy artillery began with a slow bombardment until 12:15 p.m., when a creeping barrage began to move from the French front line in 55 yd (50 m) bounds and a second barrage began at maximum range and crept backwards in 27 yd (25 m) bounds, until both barrages coincided on Vimy Ridge and became a standing barrage until the French infantry arrived. The IX Corps divisions found that the German defences were intact, when the attack began and the 17th Division was swept by artillery and machine-gun fire, forcing it back to its jumping-off trenches; the 18th Division managed to capture the German first position and a second attack was ordered for the afternoon. IX, XX and XXXIII corps used 10,000 shells, which contained poison gas and incendiary material on Neuville, Souchez and Angres, German artillery positions at ferme La Folie and rear areas. The shells were filled with carbon disulphide and phosphorus, which gave a combined asphyxiating and incendiary effect. The gas shells suppressed the German artillery opposite from 1:00–2:30 p.m. and set many fires in Angres but not at Souchez, which had been bombarded so much that there was little combustible material left. The 17th Division managed to advance another 110 yd (100 m) and the 18th Division was stopped in no man's land. On the right flank the 39th Division of XX Corps was repulsed in the first attack, despite creeping forward before zero hour, to be clear of a German counter-bombardment and to catch the German infantry under cover. The division prepared a new bombardment for 3:20 p.m. on the German front line, to at least advance across no man's land. The new attack also failed, as did the attacks of the 17th and 11th divisions on either flank.[60]In the XXXIII Corps area, the DM was fresh and easily overran the German front defences with minimal casualties. When the infantry pressed on, they found that the Germans had dug overlapping flanking positions and deep dugouts, which had protected German infantry from the French artillery. The infantry reached Côte 119, where fire from Souchez stopped the advance. Supporting troops had lagged behind in communication trenches full of wounded and prisoners as German artillery-fire increased and only arrived at 8:00 p.m. German counter-attacks were made using many hand grenades, which caused many casualties. To the north, the 77th and 70th divisions attacked Souchez, where the chemical shells had little effect; the 77th divisional artillery had twice the number of shells than on 9 May but was nullified by the new German defences on reverse slopes, which were immune to fire from guns and could only be engaged by Howitzers, which were brought forward on 15/16 June, only twelve hours before the attack.

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>Visibility early on 16 June ~ was ordered for the afternoon. ⇒6月16日の朝方は視界が悪く、フランス軍の重砲隊は砲撃を開始したが、午後12時15分までゆっくりとしていた。その時点で、纏いつく集中砲火がフランス軍前線の55ヤード(50 m)以内に移動して来はじめて、第2の集中砲火が最大範囲に届いて、27ヤード(25 m)の範囲で後方部に纏いつき始めた。そして、その両方がヴィミー・リッジで重合し、フランス軍の歩兵隊が到着して、集中砲火が待機状態になるまで続いた。第IX軍団の師団は、攻撃が開始されて(所属の)第17師団が大砲と機関銃の砲火で一掃されたとき、ドイツ軍の防御隊が無傷であることと、(逆に)この師団は始発の塹壕に戻らざるを得ないことを知った。(代って)第18師団は、ドイツ軍の第1陣地を何とか攻略し、午後に2回目の攻撃が命じられた。 ※この段落、何とか字面は訳しましたが、誤訳があるかも知れませんので、その節はどうぞ悪しからず。 >IX, XX and XXXIII corps used ~ was stopped in no man's land. ⇒第IX、第XX、および第XXXIII軍団は、ヌヴィーユ、スーシェおよびアングレに対して10,000発の砲弾を使用したが、これらの砲弾には毒ガスと火炎放射性物質が含まれていた。砲弾には二硫化炭素とリンが充填されており、窒息と傷痍の結合効果があった。ガス弾は、午後1時から2時30分にかけてドイツ軍(にとって)の反砲兵隊を抑制した。そして、多くの砲火をアングレ向けに設定したが、スーシェ向けには設定しなかった。それというのも、スーシェに対しては爆弾発射を多く行ったので、可燃剤があまり残っていなかったのである。第17師団はさらに110ヤード(100 m)前進し、第18師団は中間地帯で停止した。 >On the right flank the 39th Division ~ infantry from the French artillery. ⇒右の側面では、第XX軍団の第39師団が最初の攻撃でドイツ軍の反撃を避け、庇護下のドイツ軍歩兵を捕獲すべく開戦時間前から前方に忍び寄ったにも関わらず、撃退された。この師団は、ドイツ軍の前線で少なくとも中間地帯を越えて前進するために午後3時20分に新しい砲撃を準備していた。(しかし)この新しい攻撃も、第17師団と第11師団の各側面への攻撃同様、失敗した。〔注60〕第XXXIII軍団地域では、DM(師団兵)は新鮮で、最小限の犠牲者でドイツの前線防衛をあっさりと蹂躙した。歩兵隊が踏み込んだとき、彼らはドイツ軍が相互に重なるような側面陣地と深い退避壕とを造ってあって、それがドイツ軍の歩兵隊をフランス軍の砲撃から守ったことを発見した。 >The infantry reached Côte 119, ~ twelve hours before the attack. ⇒歩兵隊がコート(斜面・沿岸)119に到着したが、スーシェからの砲火により前進が停止した。支援部隊が午後8時になってようやく到着したが、それはドイツ軍の砲撃が増加したため通信塹壕にこもり、負傷者と囚人が満ち溢れて遅れをとったからであった。ドイツ軍の反撃は手榴弾を多用して行われ、多くの犠牲者を出した。北では、第77師団と第70師団がスーシェを攻撃した。そこでは化学砲弾はほとんど影響力を持たなかった。第77師団の砲兵隊は5月9日の分の2倍の砲弾を有していたが、逆斜面での新しいドイツ軍の防御隊によってそれが無効(役立たず)にされた。そこでは砲火に対して免疫があって、榴弾砲をもってしてはじめて交戦ができる(と分かった)ので、6月15/16日、攻撃のわずか12時間前にそれが持ち込まれた。

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