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The Battle of St. Quentin (also called the First Battle of Guise (French: 1ere Bataille de Guise) was fought from 29 to 30 August 1914, during the First World War. On the night of 26 August 1914, the Allies withdrew from Le Cateau to St. Quentin. With retreat all along the line, the commander-in-chief of the French forces, Joseph Joffre, needed the Fifth Army (General Charles Lanrezac) to hold off the German advance with a counter-attack, despite a 4 mi (6.4 km) separation from the French Fourth Army on the right flank and the continual retreat of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) on the left flank. The movement of the Fifth Army took most of 28 August, turning from facing north to facing west against St. Quentin. On 29 August the Fifth Army attacked St. Quentin with their full force. The Germans captured orders from a French officer and General Karl von Bülow, commander of the German 2nd Army had time to prepare. The attacks against the town by the XVIII corps was a costly failure but X and III corps on the right were rallied by the commander of I Corps, General Louis Franchet d'Esperey. Advances on the right were made against Guise and forced the Germans, including the Guard Corps, to fall back. That night, Joffre ordered Lanrezac to resume his retreat and destroy the bridges over the Oise as he fell back. The orders did not reach the Fifth Army until the morning of 30 August, and the retreat began several hours late. The move went unchallenged by the 2nd Army, which neither attacked nor pursued. Bülow found that the 2nd Army was separated by the Oise, which offered the possibility of enveloping the French attack with counter-attacks from both flanks. The risk that the French could exploit the 15 km (9.3 mi) gap between the inner flanks of the 2nd Army, led Bülow to choose a cautious policy of preventing the danger and ordered the corps on the inner flanks to close up and counter-attack the French X Corps. Later in the afternoon French attacks were repulsed and the 14th Division was ordered to advance from the Somme area to intervene in the battle. The divisional commander ignored the order to let the division rest and prepare for an advance on La Fère to get behind the Fifth Army. Lieutenant-General Karl von Einem the VII Corps commander was overruled and all corps of the 2nd Army were ordered to attack and obtain a decisive victory. The Battle of St. Quentin サン=カンタンの戦い

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>The Battle of St. Quentin (also called the First Battle of Guise (French: 1ere Bataille de Guise) was fought from 29 to 30 August 1914, during the First World War. On the night of 26 August 1914, the Allies withdrew from Le Cateau to St. Quentin. ⇒「サン=カンタンの戦い」(「第一次ギーズの戦い」〈フランス語:1ere Bataille de Guise〉とも呼ばれる)は、第一次世界大戦中、1914年8月29日から30日にかけて戦われた。1914年8月26日の夜、連合国軍はル・カトーからサン=カンタンまで退却した。 >With retreat all along the line, the commander-in-chief of the French forces, Joseph Joffre, needed the Fifth Army (General Charles Lanrezac) to hold off the German advance with a counter-attack, despite a 4 mi (6.4 km) separation from the French Fourth Army on the right flank and the continual retreat of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) on the left flank. The movement of the Fifth Army took most of 28 August, turning from facing north to facing west against St. Quentin. ⇒戦線に沿って総退却したので、右側面のフランス第4方面軍から4マイル(6.4キロ)の離反距離があり、なおかつ左側面の英国遠征軍(BEF)の継続的な後退があったが、それにもかかわらずフランス軍の最高参謀司令官ジョセフ・ジョフルは、ドイツ軍の前進を反撃で阻止するようフランス第5方面軍(シャルル・ランルザック将軍)に求めた。第5方面軍は、サン=カンタンに対して北面対抗から西面対抗に転向するのに、8月28日の大半を要した。 >On 29 August the Fifth Army attacked St. Quentin with their full force. The Germans captured orders from a French officer and General Karl von Bülow, commander of the German 2nd Army had time to prepare. The attacks against the town by the XVIII corps was a costly failure but X and III corps on the right were rallied by the commander of I Corps, General Louis Franchet d'Esperey. Advances on the right were made against Guise and forced the Germans, including the Guard Corps, to fall back. ⇒8月29日、第5方面軍はサン=カンタンを全力で攻撃した。ドイツ軍は、フランス軍将校から出た命令を捕捉したので、ドイツ第2方面軍の司令官カール・フォン・ビュロー将軍はそれに備えるための時間を得た。第XVIII軍団による町への攻撃は、コストのかかる失敗であったが、右側面の第X、第III軍団は、第I軍団の司令官ルイ・フランシェ・デスペリー将軍によって再編成された。ギーズに対する進軍が右翼面でなされて、護衛軍団を含むドイツ軍を後退させた。 >That night, Joffre ordered Lanrezac to resume his retreat and destroy the bridges over the Oise as he fell back. The orders did not reach the Fifth Army until the morning of 30 August, and the retreat began several hours late. The move went unchallenged by the 2nd Army, which neither attacked nor pursued. ⇒その夜、ジョフルはランルザックに後退を再開し、退却の折にオワーズ川上の橋を破壊するように命じた。命令は8月30日の朝まで第5方面軍に届かなかったので、後退は数時間遅れて始まった。(しかし)第2方面軍は、攻撃も追跡もしなかったので、この移動はさしたる抵抗もなく行われた。 >Bülow found that the 2nd Army was separated by the Oise, which offered the possibility of enveloping the French attack with counter-attacks from both flanks. The risk that the French could exploit the 15 km (9.3 mi) gap between the inner flanks of the 2nd Army, led Bülow to choose a cautious policy of preventing the danger and ordered the corps on the inner flanks to close up and counter-attack the French X Corps. ⇒ビュローは、第2方面軍がオワーズ川によって分離されていることを発見したが、(むしろ)それによって、両岸からの反撃でフランス軍の攻撃を包囲する可能性を得た。フランス軍が第2方面軍の両側面の間の15キロ(9.3マイル)の隙間を利用する危険性があるため、ビュローは危険を防止するための慎重な方針を選択し、内側の軍団にフランス第X軍団に密着して反撃するよう命令した。 >Later in the afternoon French attacks were repulsed and the 14th Division was ordered to advance from the Somme area to intervene in the battle. The divisional commander ignored the order to let the division rest and prepare for an advance on La Fère to get behind the Fifth Army. Lieutenant-General Karl von Einem the VII Corps commander was overruled and all corps of the 2nd Army were ordered to attack and obtain a decisive victory. ⇒午後遅くにフランス軍の攻撃が撃退され、第14師団はこの戦闘に介入するためにソンム地域から前進するよう命じられた。師団司令官はこの命令を無視し、師団を休ませ、第5方面軍の背後に回り込むラ・フェールに前進するための準備をさせた。第VII軍団司令官カール・フォン・アイネム中将(の意向)はくつがえされ、第2方面軍の全軍団が攻撃をして決定的な勝利を得るようにと命じられた。 ※この段落、意味がやや不鮮明です。誤訳の節はどうぞ悪しからず。

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  • 和訳をお願いします。

    The 3rd Army crossed the Meuse and attacked the French right flank, held by I Corps (General Louis Franchet d'Esperey). The attack threatened to cut the line of retreat of the Fifth Army but I Corps stopped the German advance with a counter-attack. With the evacuation of Namur and news of the Fourth Army retreat from the Ardennes, Lanrezac ordered the Fifth Army to withdraw, lest he be encircled and cut off from the rest of the French army. The German army was victorious.

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    German pleasure with the victory in part arose from a mistaken belief that they had defeated the entirety of the BEF, not knowing that they had in fact only faced one corps and one of the cavalry brigades. It was this mistake which allowed II Corps to retire as German troops were given a night of rest instead of being sent to pursue the British forces. A second battle of Le Cateau took place in much the same area from 5 to 11 October 1918. The Allies captured the St. Quentin-Cambrai railway, 12,000 prisoners and 250 guns, but suffered 536 casualties. The Rearguard Affair of Le Grand Fayt was a rearguard action fought at Grand-Fayt by the British Expeditionary Force during the Great Retreat on the Western Front in 1914. The German 2nd Army commander General Karl von Bülow had ordered a rapid pursuit after the battles of 21–24 August against the French Fifth Army and the Expeditionary Force (EF). The 1st and 2nd armies were sent to the south-west to gain the left flank of the Allied line. The X Reserve Corps encountered "especially obstinate" resistance at Marbaix and Le Grand-Fayt. On the morning of the 26 August 1914, the 2nd Connaught Rangers under Lieutenant-Colonel A. W. Abercrombie covering the retreat of the British 5th Infantry Brigade from Petit Landrecies. Unknown to Abercrombie, by late morning the retreat had already taken place but the orders had not reached the Connaught Rangers. Hearing the sound of rifle fire coming from near-by Marbaix, Abercrombie set off with two platoons of infantry in the direction Marbaix only to come under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire. Abercrombie then ordered his force to retire on Le Grand Fayt, which locals had told him was clear of Germans, only to discover that Le Grand Fayt had been abandoned. Abercrombie and his men then came under heavy fire from Germans concealed in the village, and the order was given to retreat through the surrounding fields. Despite the German small-arms fire and the difficulty of communication in the close terrain, the retreat was carried out in an orderly fashion, although 6 officers and 280 men were still missing on 29 August, including Abercrombie. By the evening the X Reserve Corps was still near Marbaix and Avesnes. The pursuit by the 2nd Army was ordered to continue on 27 August through Landrecies and Trélon, with the X Reserve Corps advancing towards Wassigny.

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