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日本語訳お願いします。

In 1990, world-famous physicist Stephen Hawking read papers of his colleagues proposing their version of a time machine, but he was immediately, skeptical. His intuition told him that time travel was not possible because there are no tourists from the future. Hawking also raised a challenge to the world of physics. There ought to be a law, he proclaimed, making time travel impossible. The embarrassing thing, however, was that no matter how hard physicists tried, they could not find a law to prevent time travel. Apparently, time travel seems to be consistent with the known laws of physics. Unable to find any physical law that makes time travel impossible, Hawking has recently changed his mind. He made headlines in the British papers when he said, “Time travel may be possible, but it is not practical.”

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  • 回答No.2
  • Nakay702
  • ベストアンサー率81% (8990/11072)

以下のとおり、訳文をお答えします。(面白い内容でした。) (訳文) 《1990年、世界的に有名な物理学者スティーブン・ホーキングが、タイムマシンに関する見解を提示する同僚の論文を読んだが、彼は即座に疑いを抱いた。彼は直感によって、未来からの旅行客がいないので、タイムトラベルは不可能であると感じたのである。ホーキングはまた物理学の世界に挑戦を投げかけた。タイムトラベルを不可能とする(不可能であることを示す)法則があるはずだと宣言したのである。 しかし、困ったことに、物理学者らがいかに頑張って努力しても、彼らはタイムトラベルを妨げるような法則を見つけることはできなかった。明らかに、タイムトラベルは物理学の既知の法則と一致しているようなのだ。タイムトラベルを不可能にするような物理的な法則を見つけることができなかったため、ホーキングは最近彼の考えを変えた。彼は「タイムトラベルは、可能かもしれないが現実的ではない」と語って、イギリスの新聞の見出しを飾った。》

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  • 回答No.3
  • bakansky
  • ベストアンサー率48% (3503/7246)

お遊び程度に訳してみたものですが ・・・   *  *  *  1990年に、高名な物理学者のスティーブン・ホーキングは物理学者たちが自分たちの考えたタイムマシンのアイデアを公開したものを読んで、一読して否定的な考えを抱いた。彼の考えるところでは、時間旅行というものは不可能であり、だから未来から帰還したという者などいない。そこでホーキングは、物理学会に提案をした。タイム・トラベルは不可能であるという根拠を示してくれと求めたのだ。  しかし、困ったことに、物理学者たちがどう考えても、タイム・トラベルが不可能であるとする理論を示すことができなかった。何とか回答を出そうと試みたものの、タイム・トラベルが物理法則に反しているようには見えないのだ。タイム・トラベルが不可能だという物理法則を見いだせないということを受けて、ホーキングは最近彼の考えを変えた。  ホーキングは 「時間旅行が不可能だとは言わないが、実際に行うことは出来ない」 と述べて、英国の新聞に大きく取り上げられた。

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  • 回答No.1

ホーキングは時間旅行に懐疑的だったが,それが不可能であるという物理法則を見いだすことができなかった。ついに,「時間旅行は可能かもしれないが,実現しない」と表明するにいたった。

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