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What do Sherlock Holmes and Albert Einstein have in common? Both were extraordinary thinkers, one a fictional genius, the other a real genius curious, original, and brilliant. And both were amateur violinists. The link between these aspects is significant. When either man got really stuck in his problem solving, he would turn to the same solution: playing the violin. ally is not atrish A typical scene in the detective novel finds Dr. Watson, the loyal assistant, walking up the stairs-knowing, from the wild violin sounds he hears, that the great Sherlock Holmes's powers to solve problems are being severely tested by the case he is working on. Holmes apparently trusted the process of logical deduction, but he trusted another process, too -the act of music making. The two processes worked together somehow, each helping the other in a way that the author of the stories hints at but doesn't attempt to define. Einstein also found a way to aid his thinking through violin playing. He may not have been an especially skilled violinist, but that is clearly not important. "Whenever he felt that he had come to the end of the road or into a difficult situation in his work," his elder son has said, "he would engage in music, and that would usually resolve all his difficulties." Musical forms, beauty, and patterns took both these geniuses' minds beyond conventional thinking into an advanced type of thought. In both relaxed their result-focused minds somehow, allowing their cases subconscious minds to guide them-and playing music provided this link between conscious and subconscious. In short, they solved real-world problems by losing themselves in music, specifically in the violin. I would guess that Einstein was not a cautious player, either. He attributed his scientific creativity directly to this quality of childlike curiosity.

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ご指名くださり、ありがとうございます。以下のとおりお答えします。 (むずかしいですが、面白い内容でした。) (訳文) >What do Sherlock Holmes and Albert Einstein have in common? Both were extraordinary thinkers, one a fictional genius, the other a real genius curious, original, and brilliant. And both were amateur violinists. The link between these aspects is significant. ⇒シャーロック・ホームズとアルバート・アインシュタインに共通することは何か? 両者とも、大変な思想家であり、一人は架空の天才、もう一人は本物の天才で、好奇心旺盛、独創的、そして、光り輝く偉大な人物であった。また両者ともアマチュアのバイオリニストであった。この局面間の関連に重要な意味がある。 >When either man got really stuck in his problem solving, he would turn to the same solution: playing the violin. *ally is not atrish A typical scene in the detective novel finds Dr. Watson, the loyal assistant, walking up the stairs-knowing, from the wild violin sounds he hears, that the great Sherlock Holmes's powers to solve problems are being severely tested by the case he is working on. ⇒二人のうちのどちらかが、真に問題解決に行き詰まってしまうような場合、彼は相手と同じ解決策に向かったことであろう:バイオリンを弾くことである。(*4語分訳不能)探偵小説の典型的な場面では、聞こえてくる荒々しいバイオリンの音から、問題を解決するために偉大なシャーロック・ホームズが取り組んでいる事件によって彼の力量が厳しくテストされていることを知って―忠実な助手ワトソン博士が2階に上がってくるのが見られる。 *この ally is not atrish の部分は、前後に誤植・欠落があるものと推測されます。 >Holmes apparently trusted the process of logical deduction, but he trusted another process, too -the act of music making. The two processes worked together somehow, each helping the other in a way that the author of the stories hints at but doesn't attempt to define. ⇒ホームズが論理的推論のプロセスを信頼していたのは明らかだが、彼は別のプロセスも信頼していた―それは音楽制作の行為である。この2つのプロセスは、なぜか協同したのである。すなわち、それぞれが物語の作者(張本人)を暗示するけれども、同定することはしない方法で互いが助け合うのである。 >Einstein also found a way to aid his thinking through violin playing. He may not have been an especially skilled violinist, but that is clearly not important. "Whenever he felt that he had come to the end of the road or into a difficult situation in his work," his elder son has said, "he would engage in music, and that would usually resolve all his difficulties." ⇒アインシュタインもまた、バイオリン演奏を通して彼の思考の手助けとする方法を見つけた。彼は、特に熟練したバイオリニストではなかったかもしれないが、しかし、そのことが重要でないことは明らかだった。「彼が仕事の限界や困難な状況に遭遇したと感じたときはいつも、彼は音楽に関わるのでした、そして通常、そのことがすべての困難を解決するのでした」と彼の長男が語っている。 >Musical forms, beauty, and patterns took both these geniuses' minds beyond conventional thinking into an advanced type of thought. In both relaxed their result-focused minds somehow, allowing their cases subconscious minds to guide them-and playing music provided this link between conscious and subconscious. ⇒音楽の持つ形態、美しさ、および類型が、これら両天才の心を、従来の思考を超えた高度なタイプの思考へと進めさせてくれたのだ。どちらの場合も、彼らの結果集中の心を何らかの方法でリラックスさせ、潜在意識の心が彼らを導くことを可能にし、そして音楽を演奏することが意識と潜在意識の間のこのつながりを提供したのである。 >In short, they solved real-world problems by losing themselves in music, specifically in the violin. I would guess that Einstein was not a cautious player, either. He attributed his scientific creativity directly to this quality of childlike curiosity. ⇒一言で言えば、彼らは音楽に、特にバイオリンに(没頭して)自分自身を失うことによって現実世界の問題を解決した。アインシュタインとて慎重なプレイヤーではなかっただろう、と私は思う。彼は、彼の科学的創造性を直接に子供のような(夾雑物のない)好奇心のこの質に帰したのである。

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