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This exaggeration may have been because he wore a huge Cossack fur hat, and tall boots which added a foot to his height. Although, if this was accurate, he would have been taller than Robert Wadlow, now cited as the world's tallest man. Machnow died in 1912 due to pneumonia and likely complications of Acromegaly although there are other versions of the story. Some believed he had been poisoned by rivals or envious competitors (Machnow was a rather well known wrestler), but no evidence for this is available. He was the father of four children none of whom reached a height greater than two meters. John Middleton (1578–1623) was an English giant who was born in the village of Hale and is commonly known as the Childe of Hale. Legend tells that he slept with his feet out of the window of his small house. Tales also credit him with great strength. John Middleton was born in the village of Hale, near Liverpool. According to contemporary accounts and his epitaph, Middleton grew to the height of 9 feet 3 inches (2.82 m) and slept with his feet hanging out the window of his house. Because of his size the landlord and sheriff of Lancashire, Gilbert Ireland, hired him as a bodyguard. When King James I stopped by in 1617 to knight Ireland he heard about Middleton and invited both of them to the court, which they accepted in 1620. Middleton beat the King's champion in wrestling and in doing so broke the man's thumb. He received £20, a large amount of money in those times. Unfortunately, jealous of his wealth, Middleton's companions mugged him or swindled him out of his money while he was returning to Hale. John Middleton died impoverished in 1623. He was buried in the cemetery of St Mary's Church in Hale. The epitaph reads, "Here lyeth the bodie of John Middleton the Childe of Hale. Nine feet three. Borne 1578 Dyed 1623." There have been numerous local uses and commemorations of Middleton; a pub in Hale, named "The Childe of Hale", bears a copy of the Brasenose College portrait as its sign. Previously situated across the road from the church was a large tree trunk. In 1996 it was carved with representations of John Middleton, Hale Lighthouse and other local symbols. In 2011, due to disease and in the interests of public safety the tree trunk was removed by Halton Borough Council. In April 2013, the wooden sculpture was replaced by a bronze statue 3 m tall by local sculptor, Diane Gorvin. Brasenose College, Oxford, possesses one life-sized portrait, two smaller paintings and two life-sized representations of his hands. Another life-sized portrait can be seen at Speke Hall in Liverpool, a National Trust property. Speke Hall is located near to the village of Hale and incorporates a woodland trail depicting his house, feet, hands and other items.

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>This exaggeration may have ~ the world's tallest man. Machnow died in 1912 ~ greater than two meters. ⇒この誇張は、彼が巨大な毛皮のコサック帽をかぶり、上げ底のブーツを履いていたためかもしれない。しかし、もしこれが正確であれば、彼は現在世界で最も背の高い男として引用されているロバート・ワズローよりも背が高かったことになる。  マクノウは1912年に肺炎とアクロメガリー(先端巨大症)の合併症で死亡したが、他にも話がある。彼はライバルや羨望する競争相手(マクノウはかなり有名なレスラー)に毒を盛られたと信じる者もいたが、その有効な証拠はない。彼は4人の子供の父親で、そのうちの誰も2メートルを超える身長に達しなかった。 >John Middleton (1578–1623) was ~ they accepted in 1620. Middleton beat the King's ~ was returning to Hale. ⇒ジョン・ミドルトン(1578年-1623年)は、ヘイル村で生まれた英国の巨人で、一般的には「ヘイルのチルド」(貴族の子息)として知られている。伝説では、彼は自分の小さな家の窓から足を出して眠ったことが伝えられている。物語伝説はまた、彼を偉大な力持ちと称賛している。ジョン・ミドルトンはリバプール近くのヘイル村で生まれた。現代に伝わる話と碑文によると、ミドルトンは9フィート3インチ(2.82メートル)の高さまで成長し、家の窓から足をぶら下げて眠っていたという。ランカシャーの地主兼保安官ギルバート・アイルランドは、彼の大きさのゆえに彼をボディガードとして雇った。国王ジェームズI世が1617年にアイルランドの騎士団に立ち寄ったとき、彼はミドルトンらのことを聞き及んで、二人を宮廷に招待し、1620年に受け入れた。  ミドルトンは、国王(領内)のチャンピオンとレスリングをし、その人の親指を折って、彼を破った。それで彼は当時の時価で20ポンドを受け取った。不幸にも、ミドルトンの仲間が彼の富に嫉妬して、彼がヘイルに戻っている間に財貨を剥奪または詐取した。 >John Middleton died impoverished ~ by Halton Borough Council. ⇒ジョン・ミドルトンは、1623年に貧困で死亡した。彼はヘイルのセントメアリー教会の墓地に埋葬された。碑文には、「ヘイルのチルドことジョン・ミドルトンの巨体ここに眠る。9フィート3インチ。1578年生まれ1623年没」と書いてある。ミドルトンには、地元の慣習や記念日が数多くある。ヘールにある「ヘイルのチルド館」という名前のパブには、その象徴としてブラスノーズ大学の肖像画の写しが架かっている。以前は教会の向かい側に大きな木の幹があった。1996年、その幹にヘール灯台と他の地元の象徴としてジョン・ミドルトンの彫像が刻まれた。2011年に、樹木の病気と公共の安全のために、木の幹はハルトン・ボロー市長(の命)によって除去された。 >In April 2013, the wooden ~ hands and other items. ⇒2013年4月、地元の彫刻家ダイアン・ゴーヴィンによって(別の)木材に彫刻された身長3メートルの銅像に置き換えられた。オックスフォードのブラスノーズ大学は、等身大の肖像画、それより小さい2枚の絵画、および2個の等身大の手の彫刻を所蔵する。ナショナルトラスト(国家企業合同)の不動産であるリバプールのスピークホールには、他の実物大の肖像画が見られる。スピークホールはヘイル村の近くにあり、彼の家、足、手などのアイテムを描いた森林遊歩道がある。

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