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Turkey officially ceded Adakale Island in River Danube to Romania with Articles 25 and 26 of the Treaty of Lausanne; by formally recognizing the related provisions in the Treaty of Trianon of 1920. Due to a diplomatic irregularity at the 1878 Congress of Berlin, the island had technically remained part of the Ottoman Empire. Turkey also renounced its privileges in Libya which were defined by Article 10 of the Treaty of Ouchy in 1912 (per Article 22 of the Treaty of Lausanne in 1923.) Among many agreements, there was a separate agreement with the United States: the Chester concession. The United States Senate refused to ratify the treaty, and consequently Turkey annulled the concession. The Treaty of Lausanne led to the international recognition of the sovereignty of the new Republic of Turkey as the successor state of the defunct Ottoman Empire. The Convention on the Straits lasted only thirteen years and was replaced with the Montreux Convention Regarding the Regime of the Straits in 1936. The customs limitations in the treaty were shortly reworked. Hatay Province remained a part of the French Mandate of Syria according to the Treaty of Lausanne, but in 1938 gained its independence as the Hatay State, which later joined Turkey after a referendum in 1939. Political amnesty was applied to the 150 personae non gratae of Turkey (mostly descendants of the Ottoman dynasty) who slowly acquired citizenship — the last one was in 1974.

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>Turkey officially ceded Adakale Island in River Danube to Romania with Articles 25 and 26 of the Treaty of Lausanne; by formally recognizing the related provisions in the Treaty of Trianon of 1920. Due to a diplomatic irregularity at the 1878 Congress of Berlin, the island had technically remained part of the Ottoman Empire. ⇒トルコは、1978年の「トリアノン条約」の関連規定を正式に承認することにより、「ローザンヌ条約」の第25条、第26条をもってドナウ川のアダカレ島をルーマニアに正式に引き渡した。1878年の「ベルリン議会」での外交上の不規則性との関係により、島は技術的にオスマン帝国の一部として残っていた。 >Turkey also renounced its privileges in Libya which were defined by Article 10 of the Treaty of Ouchy in 1912 (per Article 22 of the Treaty of Lausanne in 1923.) Among many agreements, there was a separate agreement with the United States: the Chester concession. The United States Senate refused to ratify the treaty, and consequently Turkey annulled the concession. ⇒トルコはまた、1912年の「ウーシー条約」第10条で定義されていた(1923年の「ローザンヌ条約」第22条により)リビアでの特権を放棄した。多くの協定の中で、米国との間には別の協定案「チェスター譲歩」があった。アメリカ合衆国上院は、この条約の批准を拒否したので、その結果トルコは譲歩を取り消した。 >The Treaty of Lausanne led to the international recognition of the sovereignty of the new Republic of Turkey as the successor state of the defunct Ottoman Empire. The Convention on the Straits lasted only thirteen years and was replaced with the Montreux Convention Regarding the Regime of the Straits in 1936. The customs limitations in the treaty were shortly reworked. ⇒「ローザンヌ条約」の主導で、消滅したオスマン帝国の後継国として、新しいトルコ共和国の主権が国際的に認められるに至った。海峡に関する条約は13年間しか続かず、1936年に「海峡の管理体制に関するモントルー条約」に置き換えられた。条約の関税制限も間もなく修正された。 >Hatay Province remained a part of the French Mandate of Syria according to the Treaty of Lausanne, but in 1938 gained its independence as the Hatay State, which later joined Turkey after a referendum in 1939. Political amnesty was applied to the 150 personae non gratae of Turkey (mostly descendants of the Ottoman dynasty) who slowly acquired citizenship — the last one was in 1974. ⇒「ローザンヌ条約」によると、ハタイ県はフランス領シリアの一部であり続けたが、1938年にハタイ国家として独立し、その後1939年に国民投票を経てトルコに合流した。トルコの恩恵に与れない150人(大部分はオスマン王朝の子孫)に対して、政治的な恩赦が適用され、その人たちは、ゆっくりとではあるが市民権を取得していった―その最後の(恩赦の)1つは1974年であった。 ※この段落は、誤訳があるかも知れませんが、その節はどうぞ悪しからず。

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