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The British Second Army, with some 275,000 veteran soldiers, entered Germany in late 1918. In March 1919, this force became the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR). The total number of troops committed to the occupation rapidly dwindled as veteran soldiers were demobilized, and were replaced by inexperienced men who had finished basic training following the cessation of hostilities. By 1920, the BAOR consisted of only 40,594 men and the following year had been further reduced to 12,421. The size of the BAOR fluctuated over the following years, but never rose above 9,000 men. The British did not adhere to all obligated territorial withdrawals as dictated by Versailles, on account of Germany not meeting her own treaty obligations. A complete withdrawal was considered, but rejected in order to maintain a presence to continue acting as a check on French ambitions and prevent the establishment of an autonomous Rhineland Republic. The French Army of the Rhine was initially 250,000 men strong, including at a peak 40,000 African colonial troops (Troupes coloniales). By 1923, the French occupation force had decreased to roughly 130,000 men, including 27,126 African troops. The troop numbers peaked again at 250,000 during the occupation of the Ruhr, before decreasing to 60,000 men by 1926. Germans viewed the use of French colonial troops as a deliberate act of humiliation, and used their presence to create a propaganda campaign dubbed the Black shame. This campaign lasted throughout the 1920s and 30s, although peaked in 1920 and 1921. For example, a 1921 German Government memo detailed 300 acts of violence from colonial troops, which included 65 murders and 170 sexual offenses. Historical consensus is that the charges were exaggerated for political and propaganda purposes, and that the colonial troops behaved far better than their white counterparts. An estimated 500–800 Rhineland Bastards were born as a result of fraternization between colonial troops and German women, and whom would latter be persecuted. The United States Third Army entered Germany with 200,000 men. In June 1919, the Third Army demobilized and by 1920 the US occupation force had been reduced to 15,000 men. Wilson further reduced the garrison to 6,500 men, prior to the inauguration of Warren G. Harding in 1921. On 7 January 1923, after the Franco–Belgian occupation of the Ruhr, the US senate legislated the withdrawal of the remaining force. On 24 January, the American garrison started their withdrawal from the Rhineland, with the final troops leaving in early February.

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>The British Second Army, with some 275,000 veteran soldiers, entered Germany in late 1918. In March 1919, this force became the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR). The total number of troops committed to the occupation rapidly dwindled as veteran soldiers were demobilized, and were replaced by inexperienced men who had finished basic training following the cessation of hostilities. By 1920, the BAOR consisted of only 40,594 men and the following year had been further reduced to 12,421. ⇒英国第2方面軍は、27万5000人の老練兵をもって、1918年後半にドイツに入国した。1919年3月、この軍団は「ライン川英国方面軍」(BAOR)になった。委託された占領軍の総数が急速に減少して老練兵が解散されたので、軍隊は、敵対行為の停止に続いて、基本的な訓練経験の浅い兵士に置き換えられた。1920年までに、BAORはわずか40,594人の兵士で構成され、翌年はさらに12,421人に減少した。 >The size of the BAOR fluctuated over the following years, but never rose above 9,000 men. The British did not adhere to all obligated territorial withdrawals as dictated by Versailles, on account of Germany not meeting her own treaty obligations. A complete withdrawal was considered, but rejected in order to maintain a presence to continue acting as a check on French ambitions and prevent the establishment of an autonomous Rhineland Republic. ⇒BAORの規模は、その後年余にわたって変動していったが、9,000人を超えることはなかった。英国は、ドイツが自らの条約義務を履行していないという理由で、ベルサイユで指図されたすべての義務的な領土撤退を遵守しなかった。完全な撤退が検討されたが、フランスの野心を規制する働きを継続し、自治権をもったラインランド共和国の設立を妨げる存在を維持するために、(撤退は)拒否された。 >The French Army of the Rhine was initially 250,000 men strong, including at a peak 40,000 African colonial troops (Troupes coloniales). By 1923, the French occupation force had decreased to roughly 130,000 men, including 27,126 African troops. The troop numbers peaked again at 250,000 during the occupation of the Ruhr, before decreasing to 60,000 men by 1926. Germans viewed the use of French colonial troops as a deliberate act of humiliation, and used their presence to create a propaganda campaign dubbed the Black shame. ⇒ライン川のフランス方面軍は当初、25万人の軍勢を擁していた。その中には、ピーク時でアフリカ植民地部隊の4万人が含まれていた。フランス占領軍は1923年までに、アフリカ軍隊の2万7,126人を含めても、約13万人にまで減少した。1926年までには6万人に減少したが、その前に(一時)ルフル占領中に再度25万人に達した。ドイツ人は、フランスの植民地軍隊の使用を屈辱的な行為と見なし、その存在を利用して騒ぎ立て、黒人の恥と言いふらす宣伝活動をした。 >This campaign lasted throughout the 1920s and 30s, although peaked in 1920 and 1921. For example, a 1921 German Government memo detailed 300 acts of violence from colonial troops, which included 65 murders and 170 sexual offenses. Historical consensus is that the charges were exaggerated for political and propaganda purposes, and that the colonial troops behaved far better than their white counterparts. An estimated 500–800 Rhineland Bastards were born as a result of fraternization between colonial troops and German women, and whom would latter be persecuted. ⇒この活動は、1920年、21年にピークを迎えたが、1920年代と30年代を通して続いた。例えば、1921年のドイツ政府のメモには、植民地軍による300件の暴力行為が詳述されており、それには65件の殺人と170件の性的犯罪が含まれている。歴史的世論によれば、政治や宣伝目的の挑発が誇張されたのであって、植民地軍の振舞いは白人のそれよりもはるかに優れていたという。推定500~800人の「ラインランド混血児」が植民地軍とドイツ人女性との、敵国民間の友好関係の結果として生まれたが、後者は迫害されたようである。 >The United States Third Army entered Germany with 200,000 men. In June 1919, the Third Army demobilized and by 1920 the US occupation force had been reduced to 15,000 men. Wilson further reduced the garrison to 6,500 men, prior to the inauguration of Warren G. Harding in 1921. On 7 January 1923, after the Franco–Belgian occupation of the Ruhr, the US senate legislated the withdrawal of the remaining force. On 24 January, the American garrison started their withdrawal from the Rhineland, with the final troops leaving in early February. ⇒米国第3方面軍は20万人の兵士をもってドイツに入国した。(しかし)1919年6月、第3方面軍は解散され、1920年までに米国占領軍は15,000人に減少した。ウィルソンは、1921年にウォーレン・G.ハーディングの就任に先立ち、さらに守備隊を6,500人に減らした。1923年1月7日、ベルギーのルフル占領後、米国の上院は残りの軍団の撤収を法律で制定した。1月24日、米国守備隊はラインランドからの撤退を開始し、最終の軍隊が2月初めに退去した。

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