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Motor lorries supplied Jericho from Jerusalem but from Jericho to Amman the Anzac Mounted Divisional Train and Egyptian Camel Transport Corps transported supplies on camels and pack horses, mules or donkeys. They covered 24 miles (39 km) a day from the foot of the mountains to the troops at Amman with the severe weather and slippery mountain tracks causing many casualties to camels and drivers. The total distance covered by lorries, horses and camels, from railhead to Jerusalem and on to the men in the firing line, was 86 miles (138 km). Of the 2,000 camels used on convoy duties 100 were killed in action and 92 had to be destroyed because of injuries received during the operations. During the retreat from Amman many of the camels had been overloaded. Aftermath Retreat 31 March – 2 April It was, in its way, one of the most daring exploits of the war. A weak division, aided by Australian mounted troops, crossed the Jordan and, cut off from the rest of our army, went clean through the Turks for a distance of forty miles, cut the railway and returned with all their wounded and hundreds of prisoners [but their dead had to be left behind]. Their jumping–off point was a thousand feet below sea level, the railway was four thousand feet above them. There were no roads through the mountains and it rained almost the whole time. They got there in forty–eight hours. When they reached Es Salt the inhabitants turned out en bloc to greet them, standing on the roofs of their houses and loosing off rifles into the air. N. C. Sommers Down (Lieutenant/Captain Gordon Highlanders); 15 May 1918 diary entry during convalescence when he shared a tent with another officer wounded in the 'romantic Amman stunt' about which there was 'too little in the papers'. By 30 March Chaytor's force had pushed infantry in the Ottoman 48th Division back into Amman and after desperate fighting the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade had entered the town 2 miles (3.2 km) west of the station, but German and Ottoman machine guns positioned on the hills beyond were too strong and all efforts to dislodge enemy forces from the Hejaz Railway's Amman station failed. It was considered that any further attempts to capture the Amman Railway Station would incur unacceptable losses and the decision to withdraw was therefore made.

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>Motor lorries supplied Jericho from Jerusalem but from Jericho to Amman the Anzac Mounted Divisional Train and Egyptian Camel Transport Corps transported supplies on camels and pack horses, mules or donkeys. They covered 24 miles (39 km) a day from the foot of the mountains to the troops at Amman with the severe weather and slippery mountain tracks causing many casualties to camels and drivers. The total distance covered by lorries, horses and camels, from railhead to Jerusalem and on to the men in the firing line, was 86 miles (138 km). ⇒エルサレムからエリコまでは貨物自動車で供給品を送ったが、エリコからアンマンまではアンザック騎馬師団列車部隊およびエジプトのラクダ輸送隊がラクダ、馬、ミュール(ラバ)、ロバで供給を行った。彼らはアンマンの軍隊のために、山々の麓から過酷な天候と滑りやすい山道を通行して、一日24マイル(39キロ)をカバーしたが、それでラクダや運転手に多くの死傷者がもたらされた。兵站駅からエルサレムまでの総距離を貨物自動車、馬、ラクダでカバーしたが、砲撃戦線の兵隊のところまでは86マイル(138キロ)であった。 >Of the 2,000 camels used on convoy duties 100 were killed in action and 92 had to be destroyed because of injuries received during the operations. During the retreat from Amman many of the camels had been overloaded. ⇒護送の役務に使用される2,000頭のラクダのうち、100頭が戦闘で殺され、92頭が作戦行動中に受けた傷がもとで不能となったに違いない。(それで)アンマンからの退去中は、多くのラクダに過負荷がかけられていた。 >Aftermath Retreat 31 March – 2 April It was, in its way, one of the most daring exploits of the war. A weak division, aided by Australian mounted troops, crossed the Jordan and, cut off from the rest of our army, went clean through the Turks for a distance of forty miles, cut the railway and returned with all their wounded and hundreds of prisoners [but their dead had to be left behind]. Their jumping–off point was a thousand feet below sea level, the railway was four thousand feet above them. There were no roads through the mountains and it rained almost the whole time. ⇒余波 3月31日~4月2日の退却 ことほどさように、それは戦争の最も大胆な功績の一つであった。か弱い1個師団が、オーストラリア軍騎馬軍隊の援助を得てヨルダンを横断し、我が軍の残り部隊から切り離されながらも、40マイルの距離を行軍しながらトルコ兵を一掃し、鉄道を切断し、自軍の負傷兵全員と何百人もの囚人とともに帰還した〔彼ら囚人のうちの死亡者は残さざるを得なかった〕。彼らの出発地点は海抜1000フィート下にあり、鉄道はその上4,000フィートにあった。山を通る道はなく、しかもほとんど常に雨が降っていた。 >They got there in forty–eight hours. When they reached Es Salt the inhabitants turned out en bloc to greet them, standing on the roofs of their houses and loosing off rifles into the air.  N. C. Sommers Down (Lieutenant/Captain Gordon Highlanders*); 15 May 1918 diary entry during convalescence when he shared a tent with another officer wounded in the 'romantic Amman stunt' about which there was 'too little in the papers'. ⇒彼らは48時間でそこに着いた。彼らがエス・ソルトに到着したとき、住民は彼らを迎えるため一塊になって、家の屋根に立って、ライフルを空に向って発射した。  N. C. ソマーズ・ダウン(ゴードン・ハイランダー隊*中尉/大尉)、彼は1918年5月15日の病気回復期に、「ロマンチックなアンマン襲撃」で負傷した別の役人とテントを共有したとき日誌を記入したが、それは「紙面上ほんのちょこっとだけしか」(書かれて)いなかった。 *Gordon Highlanders「ゴードン・ハイランダー隊」:スコットランド連隊のこと。 >By 30 March Chaytor's force had pushed infantry in the Ottoman 48th Division back into Amman and after desperate fighting the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade had entered the town 2 miles (3.2 km) west of the station, but German and Ottoman machine guns positioned on the hills beyond were too strong and all efforts to dislodge enemy forces from the Hejaz Railway's Amman station failed.  It was considered that any further attempts to capture the Amman Railway Station would incur unacceptable losses and the decision to withdraw was therefore made. ⇒3月30日までにチェイター軍はオスマン帝国第48師団の歩兵隊をアンマンに押し戻し、ニュージーランド騎馬ライフル旅団は必死に戦った後、駅の西から町に2マイル(3.2キロ)入ったが、丘陵上に陣取るドイツ・オスマン帝国軍の機関銃があまりにも強く、ヘジャズ鉄道のアンマン駅から敵軍を追放するためのあらゆる努力は失敗に帰した。  アンマン鉄道駅を捉えるためのさらなる試みは、容認できないほどの損失を招いてしまったので、それで撤退の決定がなされたものと見られる。

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    From Es Salt, thousands of Armenian and Bedouin refugees and others joined the withdrawing columns carrying their belongings on their backs or pushing them in carts, some of the aged and footsore given a lift in the horse-drawn limber wagons. The front lines were still engaged when the withdrawal began. It was necessary, firstly to move the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade back from Hill 3039, across the Wadi Amman. They received their orders at 18:00 to withdraw to the cross road at the western end of the plateau just above the village of Ain es Sir. By 23:00 all wounded had been started on their journey back to the Jordan Valley and the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade commenced to recross the Wadi Amman at midnight; reaching the cross roads at 04:00 on 31 March. An outpost line was set up across the country between Ain es Sir and Amman and the whole day was spent in concentrating Chaytor's and Shea's force – mounted troops, infantry, camels and camel transport; and in getting all camels, both camel brigade and Egyptian Camel Transport Corps down the mountains. The 2nd Light Horse Brigade and the Somerset Battery took the Es Salt road while the remainder of the force, including the infantry, withdrew by the Wadi Es Sir track, up which the New Zealand Brigade had advanced. All day long and all the next night a long line of weary camels, horses and men slowly stumbled, slipped and fell, down the mountain track which descends some 4,000 feet (1,200 m) in 8 miles (13 km). It was well after daylight on the morning of 1 April, before the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade; the rearguard was able to start retiring again, while being fully occupied in holding off advanced German and Ottoman troops. The Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment had regained its 6th Squadron which had been detached to the infantry division; the 60th (London) Division, and was ordered to cover the rear of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade. German and Ottomans attacks on this rearguard were held off until the regiment filed down through the village of Ain es Sir. At 07:45 on 1 April as the rearguard of Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment passed through the village the 2nd (Wellington West Coast) Squadron was attacked by Circassians who suddenly opened fire from a mill and adjacent caves, from houses and from behind rocks on the nearby hills.

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