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The German attacks stopped at 8:30 p.m. and after a quiet night, troops from X and I Anzac corps occupied Cameron House and the head of the Reutelbeek valley near Cameron Covert. The German Official History later recorded that the German counter-attacks found well-dug-in (eingenistete) infantry and in places more British attacks. Aftermath Analysis Each of the three German ground-holding divisions attacked on 26 September had an Eingreif division in support, which was twice the ratio of 20 September. No ground captured by the British had been regained and the counter-attacks had managed only to reach ground held by the remnants of the front-line divisions. Second Army Intelligence estimated that ten divisional artilleries had supported the German troops defending the Gheluvelt Plateau, doubling the Royal Artillery casualties compared to the previous week. Casualties The British had 15,375 casualties; 1,215 being killed. In Der Weltkrieg the German official historians recorded 13,500 casualties from 21–30 September, to which J. E. Edmonds, the British official historian controversially added 30 percent for lightly wounded. The 4th Australian Division suffered 1,717 casualties and the 5th Australian Division had 5,471 dead and wounded from 26–28 September. Commemoration Though smaller than in 1917, Polygon Wood is still large. The remains of three German pillboxes captured by the Australians lie deep among the trees but few trench lines remain. The Butte is still prominent and mounted on top of it is the AIF 5th Division memorial, the usual obelisk. It faces the Butte's military cemetery at the other end of which is a New Zealand memorial to the missing of the sector, the Buttes New British Cemetery (New Zealand) Memorial. Subsequent operations On 27 September in the X Corps area, the 39th Division stopped three German counter-attacks with artillery fire. In the 33rd Division area, after a report that Cameron House had been captured, a battalion attacked past it and reached the blue line.

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>The German attacks stopped at 8:30 p.m. and after a quiet night, troops from X and I Anzac corps occupied Cameron House and the head of the Reutelbeek valley near Cameron Covert. The German Official History later recorded that the German counter-attacks found well-dug-in (eingenistete) infantry and in places more British attacks.* ⇒ドイツ軍の攻撃は午後8時30分に停止して、静かな夜の後で、第X軍団と第Iアンザック軍団から来た軍隊が、キャメロン・ハウスとキャメロン・コヴァート(潜伏所)近くのリューテルベーク渓谷淵源を占拠した。ドイツ公報史家が後に記録した。ドイツ軍の反撃隊は見事な塹壕(アインゲニステテ)にこもった歩兵を発見したが、そこはまた、より多くの英国軍の攻撃場所でもあった、と。* *この文は、構文・内容ともよく分かりません。誤訳かも知れませんが、どうぞ悪しからず。 >Aftermath Analysis Each of the three German ground-holding divisions attacked on 26 September had an Eingreif division in support, which was twice the ratio of 20 September. No ground captured by the British had been regained and the counter-attacks had managed only to reach ground held by the remnants of the front-line divisions. Second Army Intelligence estimated that ten divisional artilleries had supported the German troops defending the Gheluvelt Plateau, doubling the Royal Artillery casualties compared to the previous week. ⇒余波 分析 地面保持をするドイツ軍の3個師団が9月26日に攻撃された。それぞれの師団が、9月20日時点の2倍の比率でアイングリーフ師団の支援を得ていた。(それでも)英国軍に攻略された地面は全然取り戻されず、反撃隊は辛うじて前線師団の生き残り兵が死守する地面に到着しただけであった。第2方面軍の諜報部は、10個(もの)師団砲兵隊が、ゲルヴェルト台地を防御するドイツ軍隊を支援していたので、英国砲兵隊の死傷者数は前の週に比べて倍加した、と見積った。 >Casualties The British had 15,375 casualties; 1,215 being killed. In Der Weltkrieg the German official historians recorded 13,500 casualties from 21–30 September, to which J. E. Edmonds, the British official historian controversially added 30 percent for lightly wounded. The 4th Australian Division suffered 1,717 casualties and the 5th Australian Division had 5,471 dead and wounded from 26–28 September. ⇒死傷者数 英国軍は、15,375人の死傷者数を被った。うち1,215人は殺害された。「世界大戦」において、ドイツの公報史家は9月21-30日の間で13,500人の死傷者数を記録したが、これに対して英国の公報史家J. E.エドモンズは、軽傷者分として30%を追加した。第4オーストラリア師団は1,717人の死傷者数を被り、第5オーストラリア師団は9月26-28日の間に5,471人の死傷者数を被った。 >Commemoration Though smaller than in 1917, Polygon Wood is still large. The remains of three German pillboxes captured by the Australians lie deep among the trees but few trench lines remain. The Butte is still prominent and mounted on top of it is the AIF 5th Division memorial, the usual obelisk. It faces the Butte's military cemetery at the other end of which is a New Zealand memorial to the missing of the sector, the Buttes New British Cemetery (New Zealand) Memorial. ⇒記念碑 1917年建造のものよりは小さいが、ポリゴン・ウッドの記念碑は今だに大きい。オーストラリア軍によって攻略された3か所のドイツ軍ピルボックスの残りは、樹木の間で埋もれて残っているけれども、塹壕戦線はほとんど残っていない。ビュートは、まだ聳え立ち、その頂上にAIF(大英帝国オーストラリア軍)第5師団の記念碑、通常のオベリスクが建てられている。それはビュートの軍人墓地に面しているが、その一端にこの地区で行方不明になった兵士に捧げられたニュージーランド記念碑、「ビュート新英国軍人墓地(ニュージーランド)記念碑」がある。 >Subsequent operations On 27 September in the X Corps area, the 39th Division stopped three German counter-attacks with artillery fire. In the 33rd Division area, after a report that Cameron House had been captured, a battalion attacked past it and reached the blue line. ⇒その後の作戦行動 9月27日に、第X軍団地域で第39師団が大砲砲火によって3回のドイツ軍の反撃を食い止めた。第33師団地域では、キャメロン・ハウスが攻略されたという報告のあと、1個大隊がそこを超えて攻撃し、青線部まで到達した。

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