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The offensive had resumed on 20 September, using similar step-by-step methods to those of the Fifth Army after 31 July, with a further evolution of technique, based on the greater mass of artillery made available, to enable the consolidation of captured ground with sufficient strength and organisation to defeat German counter-attacks. At the Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, most of the British objectives had been captured and held, with substantial losses being inflicted on the six German ground-holding divisions and their three supporting Eingreif divisions. British preparations for the next step began immediately and both sides studied the effect of the battle and the implications it had for their dispositions. British offensive preparations Main article: The British set-piece attack in late 1917 On 21 September, Haig instructed the Fifth and Second armies to make the next step across the Gheluvelt Plateau, on a front of 8,500 yd (7,800 m). The I ANZAC Corps would conduct the main advance of about 1,200 yd (1,100 m), to complete the occupation of Polygon Wood and the south end of Zonnebeke village. The Second Army altered its corps frontages soon after the attack of 20 September so that each attacking division could be concentrated on a 1,000 yd (910 m) front. Roads and light railways were built behind the new front line to allow artillery and ammunition to be moved forward, beginning on 20 September; in fine weather this was finished in four days. As before Menin Road, bombardment and counter-battery fire began immediately, with practice barrages fired daily as a minimum. Artillery from the VIII and IX Corps in the south conducted bombardments to simulate attack preparations on Zandvoorde and Warneton. Haig intended that later operations would capture the rest of the ridge from Broodseinde, giving the Fifth Army scope to advance beyond the ridge north-eastwards and allow the commencement of Operation Hush. The huge amounts of shellfire from both sides had cut up the ground and destroyed roads. New road circuits were built to carry supplies forward, especially artillery ammunition.

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>The offensive had resumed on 20 September, using similar step-by-step methods to those of the Fifth Army after 31 July, with a further evolution of technique, based on the greater mass of artillery made available, to enable the consolidation of captured ground with sufficient strength and organisation to defeat German counter-attacks. ⇒7月31日の後の第5方面軍の方法と同様な一歩一歩の(着実な)方法を利用して、9月20日に攻勢が再開された。(その際)ドイツ軍の反撃を破るのに十分な軍勢と組織をもって攻略した地面の強化を可能にするために、入手可能な限り大量の大砲に基づいてその方法の技術をより一層発展させた。 ※この段落は、構文がよく分かりませんでした。誤訳があるかも知れませんが、その節はどうぞ悪しからず。 >At the Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, most of the British objectives had been captured and held, with substantial losses being inflicted on the six German ground-holding divisions and their three supporting Eingreif divisions. British preparations for the next step began immediately and both sides studied the effect of the battle and the implications it had for their dispositions. ⇒「メニン道リッジの戦い」では、英国軍の標的のほとんどが攻略され、保持されたが、ドイツ軍の地面を保持する6個師団およびアイングリーフ支援3個師団(の管区)で大きい損失を受けた。英国軍の次の段階のための準備は直ちに始まり、両軍ともにこの戦いが自軍の陣地に及ぼす効果や意味を研究した。 >British offensive preparations Main article: The British set-piece attack in late 1917 On 21 September, Haig instructed the Fifth and Second armies to make the next step across the Gheluvelt Plateau, on a front of 8,500 yd (7,800 m). The I ANZAC Corps would conduct the main advance of about 1,200 yd (1,100 m), to complete the occupation of Polygon Wood and the south end of Zonnebeke village. ⇒英国軍の攻撃準備 主要な記事:1917年末の英国軍のセットピース(綿密な作戦)攻撃 9月21日に、ヘイグは第5および第2方面軍に、ゲルヴェルト高原の8,500ヤード(7,800m)にわたる前線で次の段階を実行するように指示した。第Iアンザック軍団は、主として約1,200ヤード(1,100m)の進軍を実行し、ポリゴン・ウッドおよびゾンネベケ村の南端の占拠を完成することとした。 >The Second Army altered its corps frontages soon after the attack of 20 September so that each attacking division could be concentrated on a 1,000 yd (910 m) front. Roads and light railways were built behind the new front line to allow artillery and ammunition to be moved forward, beginning on 20 September; in fine weather this was finished in four days. As before Menin Road, bombardment and counter-battery fire began immediately, with practice barrages fired daily as a minimum. ⇒第2方面軍は、9月20日の攻撃の後にすぐに、個々の攻撃師団が1,000ヤード(910m)前線に集中できるよう所属軍団の前線を変更した。9月20日から、大砲や弾薬を新しい前線の後方に移動することができるように道路および軽便鉄道が敷設された。素晴らしい天候に恵まれて、この作業は4日間で終わった。以前のメニン道と同じく、直ちに砲撃と反撃砲火が始まり、最小限毎日集中砲火が実行された。 ※すみません、この段落も構文がよく分かりませんでした。ここにも誤訳があるかも知れませんが、その節はどうか悪しからず。 >Artillery from the VIII and IX Corps in the south conducted bombardments to simulate attack preparations on Zandvoorde and Warneton. Haig intended that later operations would capture the rest of the ridge from Broodseinde, giving the Fifth Army scope to advance beyond the ridge north-eastwards and allow the commencement of Operation Hush. ⇒南の第VIII、第IX軍団から来た砲兵隊が、ザンドヴォーデとヴァルネトンに対する攻撃準備の模擬演習をするために砲撃を実施した。ヘイグは、後の作戦行動によってブロードサインデからその尾根の残りに対する攻略を意図し、第5方面軍に尾根を越えて北東に進軍する機会を与え、「ハッシュ作戦行動」の開始を認めた。 >The huge amounts of shellfire from both sides had cut up the ground and destroyed roads. New road circuits were built to carry supplies forward, especially artillery ammunition. ⇒両軍からの莫大な砲火の量は、地面を切り裂き、道路を破壊した。新しい迂回道路が、前方へ供給品を、とりわけ大砲弾薬を、供給するために築かれた。

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  • 英文を日本語訳して下さい。

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