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The Germans used aviation, flame throwers and gas attacks but despite this, the Latvian riflemen managed to hold back the German advance for 26 hours. This allowed the 12th Russian Army (including 1st Latvian Rifleman Brigade which still was in the Tīrelis swamp positions near Olaine) to safely withdraw from Riga. In the morning of 3 September, the Latvian units were ordered to retreat and they took up new defensive positions near Sigulda and Cēsis.The Battle of Jugla inflicted heavy casualties upon the Latvian rifleman units. The 5th Zemgale and 6th Tukums regiments lost more than half of their order of battle. The 7th Bauskas and 8th Valmiera regiments also suffered heavy casualties. Riga had been lost to the advancing Germans. However, an important objective had been accomplished, as the Russian 12th Army had managed to withdraw intact from Riga and managed to safely retreat to Vidzeme. The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, sometimes called "Battle of the Menin Road", was the third British general attack of the Third Battle of Ypres in the First World War. The battle took place from 20–25 September 1917, in the Ypres Salient in Flanders on the Western Front. During the pause in British and French general attacks between late August and 20 September, the British changed some infantry tactics, adopting the leap-frog method of advance, where waves of infantry stopped once they reached their objective and consolidated the ground, while other waves passed through the objective to attack the next one and the earlier waves became the tactical reserve. General adoption of the method was made possible when more artillery was brought into the salient, by increasing the number of aircraft involved in close air support and by specialising the tasks of air defence, contact-patrol, counter-attack patrol, artillery observation and ground-attack. In early September, optimism increased among German commanders that the Flanders offensive had been defeated and several divisions and air units were transferred elsewhere. Drier weather and extensive road repairs made it much easier for the British to move vast amounts of supplies forward from the original front line.

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>The Germans used aviation, flame throwers and gas attacks but despite this, the Latvian riflemen managed to hold back the German advance for 26 hours. This allowed the 12th Russian Army (including 1st Latvian Rifleman Brigade which still was in the Tīrelis swamp positions near Olaine) to safely withdraw from Riga. ⇒ドイツ軍は、航空(攻撃)、火炎放射器、およびガス攻撃を使ったが、これにもかかわらず、ラトビアのライフル射手は26時間の間ドイツ軍の進軍を何とか封じた。これによって、ロシア第12方面軍(まだオレーン近くのチレリス湿地帯陣地にあった第1ラトビアライフル射手旅団を含む)が、リガから安全に撤退することが可能になった。 >In the morning of 3 September, the Latvian units were ordered to retreat and they took up new defensive positions near Sigulda and Cēsis.The Battle of Jugla inflicted heavy casualties upon the Latvian rifleman units. The 5th Zemgale and 6th Tukums regiments lost more than half of their order of battle. ⇒9月3日の朝、ラトビア部隊は、退却するように命じられて、シグルダとチェシス近くに新しい防御陣地を定めた。「ユグラの戦い」は、ラトビアのライフル射手部隊に重い死傷者数を課した。第5ゼンガレ連隊および第6ツクムズ連隊が所定の戦闘員数の半分以上を失った。 >The 7th Bauskas and 8th Valmiera regiments also suffered heavy casualties. Riga had been lost to the advancing Germans. However, an important objective had been accomplished, as the Russian 12th Army had managed to withdraw intact from Riga and managed to safely retreat to Vidzeme. ⇒第7バウスカス連隊および第8バルミエラ連隊もまた重い死傷者数を被った。リガは、進軍するドイツ軍にかかって失われた。しかし、どうにかしてロシア軍の第12方面軍がリガから無傷で撤退し、安全にヴィゼーメまで退却しおおせた。 >The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, sometimes called "Battle of the Menin Road", was the third British general attack of the Third Battle of Ypres in the First World War. The battle took place from 20–25 September 1917, in the Ypres Salient in Flanders on the Western Front. ⇒「メニン道リッジの戦い」は、時々(単に)「メニン道の戦い」と呼ばれるが、それは第1次世界大戦の中の「第3次イープルの戦い」という、英国軍による第3回目の総攻撃であった。戦いは、1917年9月20日-25日、西部戦線のフランドルにあるイープル突出部で起った。 >During the pause in British and French general attacks between late August and 20 September, the British changed some infantry tactics, adopting the leap-frog method of advance, where waves of infantry stopped once they reached their objective and consolidated the ground, while other waves passed through the objective to attack the next one and the earlier waves became the tactical reserve. ⇒8月末から9月20日までの英国軍およびフランス軍の総攻撃休止の間に、英国軍は歩兵隊の戦術を一部変更し、ウマ飛び進軍の方法を採用した。歩兵隊が標的に達したら一旦止まって地面強化をする、その間に他の攻撃波がその標的を通過していって次の標的を攻撃する、そして、先の攻撃波隊は戦術的予備軍となる。 >General adoption of the method was made possible when more artillery was brought into the salient, by increasing the number of aircraft involved in close air support and by specialising the tasks of air defence, contact-patrol, counter-attack patrol, artillery observation and ground-attack. ⇒突出部により多くの砲兵隊が注ぎ込まれたときに、空中支援に係わる航空機の数を増やすことによって、また、防空網、接触パトロール、反撃パトロール、砲兵隊観察、および地上攻撃の各仕事を特化分掌することによって、その戦法の一般的採用が可能になった。 >In early September, optimism increased among German commanders that the Flanders offensive had been defeated and several divisions and air units were transferred elsewhere. Drier weather and extensive road repairs made it much easier for the British to move vast amounts of supplies forward from the original front line. ⇒9月初めに、フランドル攻勢が破れて、数個師団と航空部隊が他の場所に転送されたという楽天的な見方がドイツ軍司令官らの間で増大した。より乾燥した天候と広域にわたる道路修理によって、英国軍は当初の前線から莫大な量の供給品を前線へ移動することがずっと容易になった。

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