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The garrisons were able to shoot at the advancing British troops of the 48th Brigade from behind and only isolated parties of British troops managed to reach their objectives. The 49th Brigade on the left was also held up by Borry Farm, which defeated several costly attacks but the left of the brigade got within 400 yd (370 m) of the top of Hill 37. The 36th Division also struggled to advance, Gallipoli and Somme farms were behind a new wire entanglement, with German machine-guns trained on gaps made by the British bombardment, fire from which stopped the advance of the 108th Brigade. To the north, the 109th Brigade had to get across the swamp astride the Steenbeek. The infantry lost the barrage and were stopped by fire from Pond Farm and Border House. On the left troops got to Fortuin, about 400 yd (370 m) from the start line. The attack further north was much more successful. In XVIII Corps, the 48th Division attacked at 4:45 a.m. with one brigade, capturing Border House and gun pits either side of the St. Julien–Winnipeg road, where they were held up by machine-gun fire and a small counter-attack. The capture of St. Julien was completed and the infantry consolidated along a line from Border House, to Jew Hill, the gun pits and St. Julien. The troops were fired on from Maison du Hibou and Hillock Farm, which was captured soon after, then British troops seen advancing on Springfield Farm disappeared. At 9:00 a.m., German troops gathered around Triangle Farm and at 10:00 a.m., made a counter-attack which was repulsed. Another German attack after dark was defeated at the gun pits and at 9:30 p.m., another German counter-attack from Triangle Farm was repulsed. The 11th Division attacked with one brigade at 4:45 a.m. The right flank was delayed by machine-gun fire from the 48th Division area and by pillboxes to their front, where the infantry lost the barrage. On the left, the brigade dug in 100 yd (91 m) west of the Langemarck road and the right flank dug in facing east, against fire from Maison du Hibou and the Triangle.

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>The garrisons were able to shoot at the advancing British troops of the 48th Brigade from behind and only isolated parties of British troops managed to reach their objectives. The 49th Brigade on the left was also held up by Borry Farm, which defeated several costly attacks but the left of the brigade got within 400 yd (370 m) of the top of Hill 37. ⇒守備隊は、進軍する英国軍の第48旅団を背後から射撃できたので、英国軍のうちの分離された数部隊のみが何とか標的に到達できただけであった。左翼の第49旅団もまた、ボリー農場近くで止められ、攻撃も高くついて破れたが、旅団の左側面隊は、37番ヒル頂上の400ヤード(370m)範囲内にたどりついた。 >The 36th Division also struggled to advance, Gallipoli and Somme farms were behind a new wire entanglement, with German machine-guns trained on gaps made by the British bombardment, fire from which stopped the advance of the 108th Brigade.* To the north, the 109th Brigade had to get across the swamp astride the Steenbeek. The infantry lost the barrage and were stopped by fire from Pond Farm and Border House. On the left troops got to Fortuin, about 400 yd (370 m) from the start line. ⇒第36師団もまた、進軍しあぐねていた。ガリポリ農場やソンム農場は新しい鉄条網の後ろにあり、そこにいるドイツ軍の機関銃が英国軍の砲撃によってできた間隙に向けて放たれ、その砲火で師団の第108旅団の進軍は食い止められた*。北方では、第109旅団が、シュテーンベークにまたがる湿地を横切って踏破しなければならなかった。歩兵は集中砲火(の掩護)を失い、ポンド農場とボーダー・ハウス(境界線上の小屋)からの砲火によって行く手を妨げられた。左翼の軍隊は、出発地点から約400ヤード(370m)のフォルトゥインにたどり着いた。 *構文がいまいち分かりません。誤訳の節はどうぞ悪しからず。 >The attack further north was much more successful. In XVIII Corps, the 48th Division attacked at 4:45 a.m. with one brigade, capturing Border House and gun pits* either side of the St. Julien–Winnipeg road, where they were held up by machine-gun fire and a small counter-attack. The capture of St. Julien was completed and the infantry consolidated along a line from Border House, to Jew Hill, the gun pits and St. Julien. ⇒さらに北の攻撃は、もっと成功していた。第XVIII軍団では、午前4時45分に第48師団が1個旅団をもって攻撃をしかけて、ボーダー・ハウスとサン・ジュリアン-ウィニペグ道路の両側のガン・ピット*攻略したが、そこで機関銃射撃と小反撃によって足止めされた。サン・ジュリアンの攻略は完成されて、歩兵隊がボーダー・ハウスからジュー・ヒル、ガン・ピット、およびサン・ジュリアンに沿って強化統合した。 *gun pits「凹肩座墻(おうけんざしょう)」:砲や砲兵を掩護するための塹壕。 >The troops were fired on from Maison du Hibou and Hillock Farm, which was captured soon after, then British troops seen advancing on Springfield Farm disappeared. At 9:00 a.m., German troops gathered around Triangle Farm and at 10:00 a.m., made a counter-attack which was repulsed. Another German attack after dark was defeated at the gun pits and at 9:30 p.m., another German counter-attack from Triangle Farm was repulsed. ⇒軍隊は、メゾン・デュ・イボーとヒロック農場から発射される砲火を浴びたが、英国軍はすぐ後にこれを攻略してスプリングフィールド農場へ進軍し、そしてそれから姿が見えなくなった。午前9時、ドイツ軍はトライアングル農場に集められて、午前10時に反撃したが、排撃された。日暮れ後の別のドイツ軍の攻撃はガン・ピットで破られ、トライアングル農場からの別のドイツ軍の反撃も、午後9時30分に追い返された。 >The 11th Division attacked with one brigade at 4:45 a.m. The right flank was delayed by machine-gun fire from the 48th Division area and by pillboxes to their front, where the infantry lost the barrage. On the left, the brigade dug in 100 yd (91 m) west of the Langemarck road and the right flank dug in facing east, against fire from Maison du Hibou and the Triangle. ⇒第11師団は、午前4時45分に1個旅団をもって攻撃した。右側面が、その前線に対する第48師団地域とピルボックスからの機関銃砲撃によって遅れ、そこで歩兵隊は集中砲火(の掩護)を失った。左翼では、旅団は、ランゲマルク道路の西100ヤード(91m)に塹壕を掘り、右側面隊は東に面し、メゾン・デュ・イボーとトライアングル農場に対峙して塹壕を掘った。

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