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Ammunition weighing 144,000 long tons (146,000 t) was delivered with 1,000 shells for each 18-pounder, 750 shells per 4.5-inch howitzer, 500 rounds for each medium and heavy piece and another 120,000 gas and 60,000 smoke shells for the 18-pounder field guns. Australian truck near Hill 63 during a bombardment of ANZAC batteries in Messines (AWM E00649). Two thirds of the 18-pounders were to fire a creeping barrage of shrapnel immediately ahead of the advance, while the remainder of the field guns and 4.5-inch howitzers were to fire a standing barrage, 700 yards (640 m) further ahead on German positions and lift to the next target, when the infantry came within 400 yards (370 m) of the barrage. Each division was given four extra batteries of field artillery, which could be withdrawn from the barrage at the divisional commander's discretion to engage local targets. The field batteries of the three reserve divisions were placed in camouflaged positions, close to the British front line. As each objective was taken by the infantry, the creeping barrage was to pause 150–300 yards (140–270 m) ahead and become a standing barrage, while the infantry consolidated. During this time the pace of fire was to slacken to one round per-gun per-minute, allowing the gun-crews a respite, before resuming full intensity as the barrage moved on. The heavy and super-heavy artillery was to fire on German artillery positions and rear areas and 700 machine-guns were to fire a barrage over the heads of the advancing troops. At 03:00 a.m. the mines would be detonated, followed by the attack of nine divisions onto the ridge. The blue line (first objective) was to be occupied by zero + 1:40 hours followed by a two-hour pause. At zero + 3:40 hours the advance to the black line (second objective) would begin and consolidation was to start by zero + 5:00 hours.

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>4月19日に投稿した質問があるのですが回答いただけますと幸いです。 ⇒失礼しました。(長いので半ば無意識に敬遠していたかもしれません。) >Ammunition weighing 144,000 long tons (146,000 t) was delivered with 1,000 shells for each 18-pounder, 750 shells per 4.5-inch howitzer, 500 rounds for each medium and heavy piece and another 120,000 gas and 60,000 smoke shells for the 18-pounder field guns. ⇒(総計)144,000英トン(146,000t)の重量の弾薬が次のように配給された。すなわち、各18型ポンド砲に1,000発、各4.5インチの榴弾砲につき750発、各中型大型の大砲にそれぞれ500発、その他、120,000発のガス弾と60,000発の18型ポンド野戦砲用弾丸である。 >Australian truck near Hill 63 during a bombardment of ANZAC batteries in Messines (AWM E00649). ⇒メッシネス(メシーヌ)におけるアンザック砲兵中隊の砲撃期間中に、63番ヒルの近くを通るオーストラリア軍のトラック(AWM E00649型銃〔を携帯〕)。 *AWM(Arctic Warfare Magnum):寒冷地対応型の連発銃「アークティク・ウォーフェア(Arctic Warfare)ライフル」に、射程距離を伸ばすためのマグナム弾(Magnum)を装着した高性能狙撃銃。 >Two thirds of the 18-pounders were to fire a creeping barrage of shrapnel immediately ahead of the advance, while the remainder of the field guns and 4.5-inch howitzers were to fire a standing barrage, 700 yards (640 m) further ahead on German positions and lift to the next target, when the infantry came within 400 yards (370 m) of the barrage. Each division was given four extra batteries of field artillery, which could be withdrawn from the barrage at the divisional commander's discretion to engage local targets. The field batteries of the three reserve divisions were placed in camouflaged positions, close to the British front line. ⇒18型ポンド砲の3分の2は、直接進軍の行く手に(立ちはだかる敵軍)対する、纏いつく集中砲火の発砲を行うことになっていた。一方、残りの野戦砲と4.5インチ榴弾砲は、交替(待機)の集中砲火を行うことになっていた。それは、700ヤード(640m)先のドイツ軍陣地に対して、および歩兵連隊が400ヤード(370m)以内に入ったとき次の標的攻撃に切り換えて行われるものである。各々の師団は、特務班として野戦砲兵隊の4個中隊を与えられるが、それは局所の標的と交戦するために師団長の決定権のもとに集中砲火から撤退(転進)することができた。英国軍の最前線の近くに、3個の予備師団の野戦砲兵中隊がカモフラージュされた陣地に配置されていた。 >As each objective was taken by the infantry, the creeping barrage was to pause 150–300 yards (140–270 m) ahead and become a standing barrage, while the infantry consolidated. During this time the pace of fire was to slacken to one round per-gun per-minute, allowing the gun-crews a respite, before resuming full intensity as the barrage moved on. The heavy and super-heavy artillery was to fire on German artillery positions and rear areas and 700 machine-guns were to fire a barrage over the heads of the advancing troops. ⇒各々の標的が歩兵連隊によって奪取されたので、歩兵連隊がそれを強化する間、纏いつく集中砲火は150–300ヤード(140–270m)手前で中断して、交替(待機)の集中砲火の状況になっていた。この間は、各銃が1分につき1発まで砲火のペースをゆるめて、完全な強度の集中砲火を再開する前に、砲員に一時中断を与えることになっていた。重砲兵隊と超重砲兵隊は、ドイツ軍の砲兵隊陣地および後衛部地域に対して、(前方を)進軍する軍隊の頭越しに700丁の機関銃で集中砲火を発砲することになっていた。 >At 03:00 a.m. the mines would be detonated, followed by the attack of nine divisions onto the ridge. The blue line (first objective) was to be occupied by zero + 1:40 hours followed by a two-hour pause. At zero + 3:40 hours the advance to the black line (second objective) would begin and consolidation was to start by zero + 5:00 hours. ⇒午前3時に、地雷が爆発して、尾根に対する9個師団の攻撃が続くはずである。青の戦線(第1標的)は、開始時間プラス1時間40分で占拠して、2時間の休止が続くことになっていた。開始時間プラス3時間40分で、黒の戦線(第2標的)への進軍を開始して、開始時間プラス5時間でそれの強化統合が始まるはずである。

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