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In 2015, Uffindell wrote that retrospective naming and dating of events can affect the way in which the past is understood. The Second Battle of the Aisne began on 16 April but the duration and extent of the battle have been interpreted differently. The ending of the battle is usually given as mid-May. Uffindell called this politically convenient, since this excluded the Battle of La Malmaison, in October, making it easier to blame Nivelle. Uffindel wrote that the exclusion of La Malmaison was artificial, since the attack was begun from the ground taken from April to May. General Franchet d'Espèrey called La Malmaison "the decisive phase of the Battle...that began on 16 April and ended on 2 November....". The offensive advanced the front line by 6–7 kilometres (3.7–4.3 mi) on the front of the Sixth Army, which took 5,300 prisoners and a large amount of equipment. The operation had been planned as a decisive blow to the Germans; by 20 April it was clear that the strategic intent of the offensive had not been achieved and by 25 April most of the fighting had ended. Casualties had reached 20 percent in the French armies by 10 May and some divisions suffered more than 60 percent losses. On 3 May the French 2nd Division refused orders and similar refusals and mutiny spread through the armies; the Nivelle Offensive was abandoned in confusion on 9 May.

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>In 2015, Uffindell wrote that retrospective naming and dating of events can affect the way in which the past is understood. The Second Battle of the Aisne began on 16 April but the duration and extent of the battle have been interpreted differently. The ending of the battle is usually given as mid-May. ⇒2015年、アフィンデルは、過去に遡って名をつけることや出来事の年代日付を示すことが、過去を理解する方法に影響を及ぼすことがあり得る、と書いた。第2回「エーンの戦い」は4月16日に始まったが、戦いの継続期間や範囲が違って解釈されていた。戦いの結末は、通常5月中旬とされている。 >Uffindell called this politically convenient, since this excluded the Battle of La Malmaison, in October, making it easier to blame Nivelle. Uffindel wrote that the exclusion of La Malmaison was artificial, since the attack was begun from the ground taken from April to May. General Franchet d'Espèrey called La Malmaison "the decisive phase of the Battle...that began on 16 April and ended on 2 November....". ⇒「エーンの戦い」から、10月の「ラ・マルメゾンの戦い」を除外すると、ニヴェーユを非難することがより簡単になるので、アフィンデルはこれを政治的に便利であると言った。アフィンデルは、ラ・マルメゾンの攻撃が4月から5月まで攻略した地面から始められたので、これを除外するのは人工的である、と書いた。フランシェ・デスペレィ将軍は、ラ・マルメゾンを「4月16日に始まって、11月2日に終った戦いの…決定的な段階(である)…」と呼んだ。 >The offensive advanced the front line by 6–7 kilometres (3.7–4.3 mi) on the front of the Sixth Army, which took 5,300 prisoners and a large amount of equipment. The operation had been planned as a decisive blow to the Germans; by 20 April it was clear that the strategic intent of the offensive had not been achieved and by 25 April most of the fighting had ended. ⇒攻撃隊は、第6方面軍の前線を6–7キロ(3.7–4.3マイル)進軍して、5,300人の囚人と大量の器材を捕縛した。作戦行動は、ドイツ軍に対する決定的な打撃を与えるものとして計画されたが、4月20日までには攻撃の戦略的な意図が達成されなかったことや、4月25日までには大部分の戦いが終わっていた、ということは明白であった。 >Casualties had reached 20 percent in the French armies by 10 May and some divisions suffered more than 60 percent losses. On 3 May the French 2nd Division refused orders and similar refusals and mutiny spread through the armies; the Nivelle Offensive was abandoned in confusion on 9 May. ⇒犠牲者は、5月10日までにフランス軍で20%に達して、師団によっては60%以上の損失を被った。5月3日、フランス軍の第2方面軍は指令を拒否して、類似した拒絶と反抗が数個方面軍に広がった。「ニヴェーユ攻撃」は、混乱のうちに、5月9日に放棄された。

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    This suggestion was opposed by the French and Italian delegations and the British General Staff, at least covertly and was discarded. The new French Commander-in-Chief, Robert Nivelle, believed that a concentrated attack by French forces on the Western Front during the spring of 1917, could break the German front and lead to a decisive victory. The Nivelle plan was welcomed by the British, despite many in the Cabinet and War Office being sceptical, because a French attack would mean a lesser burden falling on the British. Haig was ordered to co-operate with Nivelle but secured French agreement that in the event the offensive failed, the British would attack in Flanders with French support. On 9 April, British and Empire forces undertook a preliminary attack at the Battle of Arras and the Nivelle Offensive began on 16 April. The French attack gained ground at great cost but no breakthrough leading to open warfare and the decisive defeat of the German army occurred, leading to Nivelle being replaced by Philippe Petain, a collapse in morale and mutinies in the French armies. While the French recuperated, offensive action on the Western Front could only come from the BEF. It was not until June 1917 that the principle of a Flanders campaign was approved by the British Cabinet and more grudgingly by the Prime Minister, against his preference for an Italian campaign. Haig ordered General Herbert Plumer, the commander of the Second Army which occupied the Ypres Salient, to produce a plan in late 1916. Haig was dissatisfied with the limited scope of Plumer's plan for the capture of Messines Ridge and Pilkem Ridge – the name used in military circles for the higher ground around the small hamlet of Pilckem (Pilkem), within the dorp (village) of Boesinghe (Flemish: Boezinge). By early 1917, Haig felt that Nivelle's ambitious attempt at a decisive battle would either force the Germans to abandon the Belgian coast or that the German 4th Army in Flanders, would have divisions taken away to replace losses further south.

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