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Aristide Briand (French: [a.ʁis.tid bʁi.jɑ̃]; 28 March 1862 – 7 March 1932) was a French statesman who served eleven terms as Prime Minister of France during the French Third Republic and was a co-laureate of the 1926 Nobel Peace Prize.He was born in Nantes, Loire-Atlantique of a petit bourgeois family. He attended the Nantes Lycée, where, in 1877, he developed a close friendship with Jules Verne. He studied law, and soon went into politics, associating himself with the most advanced movements, writing articles for the Syndicalist journal Le Peuple, and directing the Lanterne for some time. From this he passed to the Petite République, leaving it to found L'Humanité, in collaboration with Jean Jaurès.At the same time he was prominent in the movement for the formation of trade unions, and at the congress of working men at Nantes in 1894 he secured the adoption of the labor union idea against the adherents of Jules Guesde. From that time, Briand was one of the leaders of the French Socialist Party.

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>Aristide Briand (French: [a.ʁis.tid bʁi.jɑ̃]; 28 March 1862 – 7 March 1932) was a French statesman who served eleven terms as Prime Minister of France during the French Third Republic and was a co-laureate of the 1926 Nobel Peace Prize. ⇒アリスティド・ブリアン(フランス語:[a.ʁis.tid bʁi.jɑ̃]; 1862年3月28日 – 1932年3月7日)は、フランス第三共和制の間フランスの首相を11期つとめたフランスの政治家で、1926年のノーベル平和賞を共同受賞した人であった。 >He was born in Nantes, Loire-Atlantique of a petit bourgeois family. He attended the Nantes Lycée, where, in 1877, he developed a close friendship with Jules Verne. He studied law, and soon went into politics, associating himself with the most advanced movements, writing articles for the Syndicalist journal Le Peuple, and directing the Lanterne for some time. From this he passed to the Petite République, leaving it to found L'Humanité, in collaboration with Jean Jaurès. ⇒彼は、ロワール-アトランティック県ナントのプチブル(小富豪・中産階級)の家系に生まれた。ナントのリセ(高校)に出席して、そこで、1877年にジュール・ベルヌ(冒険小説家)との緊密な交友関係を進展させた。彼は法律を学んですぐに政界に入り、最先進の運動に参画してサンディカリスト(労働組合主義者)のジャーナル「ル・ペプル(民衆)」誌のための記事を書き、しばらくの間「ランテルン(ランタン)」欄を担当した。そしてここから、「リュマニテ(人類)」誌に移り、さらにそれを去ってからジャン・ジョレス(社会主義者)と協力して「プティ・レピュブリク(小共和国)」誌を創立した。 >At the same time he was prominent in the movement for the formation of trade unions, and at the congress of working men at Nantes in 1894 he secured the adoption of the labor union idea against the adherents of Jules Guesde. From that time, Briand was one of the leaders of the French Socialist Party. ⇒同時に彼は、労働組合の編成のための運動に奔走し、1894年ナントの労働者議会でジュール・ゲード(マルキスト)の支持者に対して労働組合という概念の採用を確実にした。その時点からブリアンは、「フランス社会党」の指導者の1人となった。

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