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While apparently unfounded, these reports resulted in attacks on individual policemen throughout the city. Meanwhile, some soldiers mutinied. Then, on 11 March [O.S. 26 February], the Tsar ordered the army to suppress the rioting by force, but troops mutinied and joined the protesters. On the morning of 12 March (O.S. 27 February), mutinous soldiers of the Fourth Company of the Pavlovski Replacement Regiment refused to fall in on parade when commanded, shot two officers, and joined the protesters on the streets. Other regiments quickly joined in the mutiny, resulting in the hunting down of police and the gathering of 40,000 rifles which were dispersed among the workers. By nightfall of 12 March (O.S. 27 February), General Khabalov and his forces faced a capital controlled by revolutionaries. The protesters of Petrograd burned down government buildings, seized the arsenal, and released prisoners into the city.

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>While apparently unfounded, these reports resulted in attacks on individual policemen throughout the city*. Meanwhile, some soldiers mutinied. Then, on 11 March [O.S. 26 February], the Tsar ordered the army to suppress the rioting by force, but troops mutinied and joined the protesters. ⇒明らかに根拠はなかったが、これらの報告が結果したことは、都市じゅうの個々の警官に対する襲撃であった*。一方、一部の兵士が反乱を起こした。それから3月11日〔旧ロシア歴2月26日〕に、ツァーは力ずくで暴動を起こすことを抑えるよう軍に命令したが、軍隊自体が反乱を起こして、抗議者に加わった。 *この部分、前回分の最後と重複しています。 >On the morning of 12 March (O.S. 27 February), mutinous soldiers of the Fourth Company of the Pavlovski Replacement Regiment refused to fall in on parade when commanded, shot two officers, and joined the protesters on the streets. Other regiments quickly joined in the mutiny, resulting in the hunting down of police and the gathering of 40,000 rifles which were dispersed among the workers. ⇒3月12日(旧歴2月27日)の朝、パヴロフスキー置換連隊所属の第4中隊の反抗的な兵士が、行列行進に加わることを拒否して2人の将校を撃ち、通りの抗議者に加わった。他の連隊も素早く反乱に参加して、警察から40,000丁のライフルを没収・収拾して、それを労働者の間に分配する、という結果を生んだ。 >By nightfall of 12 March (O.S. 27 February), General Khabalov and his forces faced a capital controlled by revolutionaries. The protesters of Petrograd burned down government buildings, seized the arsenal, and released prisoners into the city. ⇒3月12日(旧歴2月27日)の夕暮れまでに、ハバロフ将軍と彼の軍隊が、革命家によって支配される首都に向かった。ペトログラードの抗議者たちは、政府の建物を焼き払って、兵器庫を抑え、囚人を都市内に解放した。

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