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Having successfully completed a year's military service, Arz sat and passed the reserve officers examination and went on to apply for and successfully obtain a commission as a regular officer. In 1878, he was commissioned with the rank Leutnant. Attaining the rank of Oberleutnant, Arz attended the Imperial Kriegschule in Vienna, 1885–1887, where he again distinguished himself, and in 1888 he was appointed to the General Staff. Promoted to Hauptmann and assigned to a corps staff, Arz was made Adjutant to Feldzeugmeister Baron Schönfelda before returning to the General Staff in 1898, where he was to remain, with a few breaks, until 1908. Promoted next to the rank of Major, then Oberstleutnant, Arz was attached to the 2nd Corps, then commanded by Archduke Eugen, following his assignment to the General Staff.

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>Having successfully completed a year's military service, Arz sat and passed the reserve officers examination and went on to apply for and successfully obtain a commission as a regular officer. In 1878, he was commissioned with the rank Leutnant. ⇒アルツは、一年の兵役を首尾よく完了し、予備役将校試験を受けて合格し、正規の将校に応募して首尾よく辞令を得、1878年に中尉としての階級を与えられた。 >Attaining the rank of Oberleutnant, Arz attended the Imperial Kriegschule in Vienna, 1885–1887, where he again distinguished himself, and in 1888 he was appointed to the General Staff. Promoted to Hauptmann and assigned to a corps staff, Arz was made Adjutant to Feldzeugmeister Baron Schönfelda* before returning to the General Staff in 1898, where he was to remain, with a few breaks, until 1908. ⇒中尉の位階を得たことでアルツは、ウィーンの「帝国士官学校」(Imperial Kriegschule、1885–1887年)に列席し、そこで彼はまた名を上げ、1888年には参謀幕僚に任命された。大尉(Hauptmann)に昇進して軍団付に任ぜられたアルツは、Feldzeugmeister Baron Schönfelda*の副官になった。その後1898年に参謀幕僚に戻って、途中2,3回の中断はあったが、1908年まで在任した。 *Feldzeugmeister Baron Schönfelda:詳細不明です(逐語的直訳は、「軍需品管理長・男爵・ショーンフェルダ」)。 >Promoted next to the rank of Major, then Oberstleutnant, Arz was attached to the 2nd Corps, then commanded by Archduke Eugen, following his assignment to the General Staff. ⇒次にアルツは、少佐に、それから陸軍中佐に昇進して第2軍団に配属され、そしてそれから大公オイゲンの命によって参謀幕僚の任に続いたのであった。

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  • 英文を訳して下さい。

    Almost immediately thereafter, on 7 September, Arz was given command of the 6th corps, taking over from Boroević, who had been appointed to command the Third Army. In charge of the 6th Corps, he performed outstandingly and with great energy at Limanowa-Lapanów, where his unit formed part of the 4th Army. At Gorlice-Tarnów he was again to pay an outstanding role and was in command again at Grodek-Magierow and Brest-litowsk during the summer of 1915. In September 1915, he was promoted to the rank of General der Infanterie, and having fought alongside Mackensen's 11th army he gained the respect of the Germans in his abilities as a commander.With the threatened entry of Romania into the war on the Allied side, Arz was reassigned from the 6th Corps and appointed to command the newly reorganised 1st Army on 16 August 1916. Arriving at Klausenburg, where forces were being marshalled to repel an expected Romanian advance into Transylvania, he stated "I am an Army Commander without an Army".

  • 和訳をお願いします。

    On 1 May 1902 he was promoted to Oberst and appointed to the managing bureau of the General Staff, of which department he was appointed head in May 1903. The same year, he married Stefanie Tomka von Tomkahaza und Falkusfalva, a Hungarian noblewoman, with whom he had a daughter. In 1908, Arz was again promoted, this time to the rank of Generalmajor, and was given command of the 61st Infantry Brigade. Having been steadily promoted and seen as a promising and competent officer, he received an "outstanding" evaluation from his old commander, Archduke Eugen, during 1911's fall maneuvres. 1912 saw him promoted to command a division, the 15th infantry at Miskolc. Soon afterwards Arz attained the rank of Feldmarschall-Leutnant and in 1913 was reassigned to the war ministry in Vienna to head up a section.At the outbreak of war in the Summer of 1914, Arz von Straussenburg requested a transfer to a field assignment and was again given command of the 15th infantry division, which participated in the closing stages of Komarów.

  • 日本語訳をお願いいたします。

    Generaloberst Arthur Freiherr Arz von Straußenburg (16 June 1857 – 1 June 1935) was an Austro-Hungarian Colonel General and last Chief of the General Staff of the Austro-Hungarian Army. At the outbreak of the First World War, he commanded the 15th Infantry Division. Soon, he was promoted to the head of the 6th Corps and the First Army. He participated on the Gorlice–Tarnów Offensive in 1915 and the countryside of Romania in 1916. In March 1917, he became Chief of the General Staff until his resignation on 3 November 1918.Born among the ancient Saxon settlers of east Transylvania, Arz was the product of a noble "Siebenbürger" family. His father, Albert Arz von Straußenburg, served as an evangelical preacher and curate as well as a member of the House of Magnates. Schooled in Dresden and Hermannstadt, Arz graduated "with great achievement", and went on to read law at a university, during which time he volunteered for one year's service in a Hungarian Feldjäger battalion during 1876–1877.

  • 英文の翻訳

    和訳をしていただけるかたのみで、 お願いできますでしょうか? 1つの段落の前半部分となります。 どうぞよろしくお願いいたします。 His father was a man who was Tall, and moderately fat with large eyes and black hair and a long banana or crescent moon shaped face. A proud looking man. He had trouble with one of his knees and his leg was a bit weak or crooked. He had a hospitable and generous nature. He tried to mould the minds of his children into the right direction in life. Married late in life to a woman of superior position and his past was not so good. He could be melancholic and liked to study or read in the silence of his own chamber with a lamp, which his children were not welcome to disrupt. He was stricter and sharp with the children when they were small. but, gentler when they were older and behaved better. He could be merry, eat drink and have fun and include the children. He felt happy amongst his family and children. He was intuitive and had a spiritual side.

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    Joffre set 14 August as the date when the First and Second armies were to invade Lorraine between Toul and Épinal, south of the German fortified area of Metz-Thionville. The First Army was to attack in the south with four corps, towards Sarrebourg 60 kilometres (37 mi) east of Nancy and Donon 25 kilometres (16 mi) south of Sarrebourg. Passes in the Vosges to the south of Donon were to be captured before the main advance began. The Second Army was to attack towards Morhange 45 kilometres (28 mi) north-east of Nancy, with two corps north of the First Army and three advancing successively behind the left flank of the corps to the south, to counter a German attack from Metz. The French offensive was complicated by the two armies diverging as they advanced, on difficult terrain particularly in the south, the combined fronts eventually being 150 kilometres (93 mi) wide. The advances of the First and Second armies were to attract German forces towards the south, while a French manoeuvre took place in Belgium and Luxembourg, to pierce a weak point in the German deployment and then destroy the main German armies.

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    News that German forces were attacking towards the Meuse bridges south of Namur, led Joffre to expect a German attack from Mézières to Givet, 40 kilometres (25 mi) further north, intended to envelop the French northern flank and another force to try to cross the Meuse from Montmédy to Sedan. On 12 August, Joffre allowed Lanrezac to move the I Corps west to Dinant on the Meuse and on 15 August, Joffre ordered the bulk of the Fifth Army to move north-west behind the Sambre. No large German force was expected to cross to the north of the Meuse, which made the French general staff certain that the German centre was weaker than expected. On 18 August, Joffre directed the Third, Fourth and Fifth armies together with the Belgians and British, to attack the German armies around Thionville and Luxembourg, where 13–15 German corps were thought to have assembled. The Third and Fourth armies were to defeat German forces between Thionville and Bastogne, as they attacked westwards towards Montmédy and Sedan. The Fifth Army was to intercept German forces advancing towards Givet and then the Fourth Army was to swing north and attack the southern flank of the German armies. The Third and Fourth armies would defeat decisively the main German armies in the west and for this, two more corps were added to the four in the Fourth Army, taken from the flanking armies.

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    One casualty of these changes was Conrad, with Karl reported as "not wanting  a genius to command his armies", but following on from the experience of  the supremely gifted but often unsuccessful Conrad, rather someone who  was just capable. Arz was acquainted with the emperor; not only was he  a capable commander of troops, but he also possessed a conciliatory manner  which did not make the Emperor feel he was being patronised during discussions  on military matters, as was the case with other commanders. Unlike Conrad,  Arz was not overtly political, was wholly committed to the Central Powers,  and had full faith in the Emperor. Once appointed in March 1917, Arz made every effort to comply with the Emperor 's wishes, but unlike his predecessor he acted as a personal advisor to  the Emperor on army matters, rather than as a driver of his own strategy,  which had been Conrad's hallmark.

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