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German infantry found that it was easier for the French to endure preparatory bombardments, since French positions tended to be on dominating ground, not always visible and sparsely occupied. As soon as German infantry attacked, the French positions "came to life" and the troops began machine-gun and rapid fire with field artillery. On 22 April, the Germans had suffered 1,000 casualties and in mid-April, the French fired 26,000 field artillery shells during an attack to the south-east of Fort Douaumont. A few days after taking over at Verdun, Pétain told the air commander, Commandant Charles Tricornot de Rose, to sweep away the German air service and to provide observation for the French artillery. German air superiority was challenged and eventually reversed, using eight-aircraft Escadrilles for artillery-observation, counter-battery and tactical support.

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>German infantry found that it was easier for the French to endure preparatory bombardments, since French positions tended to be on dominating ground, not always visible and sparsely occupied. As soon as German infantry attacked, the French positions "came to life" and the troops began machine-gun and rapid fire with field artillery. On 22 April, the Germans had suffered 1,000 casualties and in mid-April, the French fired 26,000 field artillery shells during an attack to the south-east of Fort Douaumont. ⇒ドイツ歩兵連隊にとっては、フランス軍の陣地が優勢な立地状況にあって、必ずしも目に触れるとは限らず、散在している傾向があるので、フランス軍は予備爆撃に耐えるのがより簡単である、ということが分かった。ドイツ歩兵連隊が攻撃をかけるや否や、フランス軍陣地は「生き返った」、そして軍隊は野戦砲兵隊をもって機関銃と速射砲の砲火を開始した。4月22日、ドイツ軍は1,000人の犠牲者を被り、4月中旬にフランス軍はドゥオモン要塞の南東部に攻撃を仕かけたとき、その間に26,000発の野戦砲の砲弾を発射した。 >A few days after taking over at Verdun, Pétain told the air commander, Commandant Charles Tricornot de Rose, to sweep away the German air service and to provide observation for the French artillery. German air superiority was challenged and eventually reversed, using eight-aircraft Escadrilles* for artillery-observation, counter-battery and tactical support. ⇒ヴェルダンに関わること数日後、ペテーンは、航空隊指揮官、シャルル・トリコルノ・ド・ローズ司令官にドイツ軍の航空軍役隊を一掃して、フランス砲兵隊のために観察結果を提供するようにと言った。彼トリコルノは、戦術支援隊、反撃飛行隊として8機編成のエスカドリル*を使って、ドイツ軍の制空権に挑戦して、結局逆転した。 *エスカドリル:第1次世界大戦時のフランス空軍の飛行中隊(普通は、6機編成)。

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