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In 1994, Afflerbach questioned the authenticity of the "Christmas Memorandum" in his biography of Falkenhayn; after studying the evidence that had survived in the Kriegsgeschichtliche Forschungsanstalt des Heeres (Army Military History Research Institute) files, he concluded that the memorandum had been written after the war but that it was an accurate reflection of much of Falkenhayn's thinking in 1916. Krumeich wrote that the Christmas Memorandum had been fabricated to justify a failed strategy and that attrition had been substituted for the capture of Verdun, only after the city was not taken quickly. Foley wrote that after the failure of the Ypres Offensive of 1914, Falkenhayn had returned to the pre-war strategic thinking of Moltke the Elder and Hans Delbrück on Ermattungsstrategie (attrition strategy), because the coalition fighting Germany was too powerful to be decisively defeated by military means.

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>In 1994, Afflerbach questioned the authenticity of the "Christmas Memorandum" in his biography of Falkenhayn; after studying the evidence that had survived in the Kriegsgeschichtliche Forschungsanstalt des Heeres* (Army Military History Research Institute) files, he concluded that the memorandum had been written after the war but that it was an accurate reflection of much of Falkenhayn's thinking in 1916. ⇒アフラーバッハは、1994年に、ファルケンハインの伝記にある「クリスマス・メモ」の確実性を問うてみた。「戦争史に関する研究施設」*(軍事史研究所)のファイルに残っている証拠を調査したあと、メモは戦争後に書かれたが、1916年のファルケンハインの考えの多くを正確に反映したものである、と彼は結論した。 *Kriegsgeschichtliche Forschungsanstalt des Heeres:「軍隊の戦争史に関する研究の公共施設」。なお、各語句の内容は以下のとおりです。Kriegsgeschichtliche=Kriegs「戦争」+geschicht「歴史」+liche(性質・所有・可能を表す接尾辞)。Forschungsanstalt=Forschungs「研究」+anstalt「公共施設」。des=(定冠詞2格、英.of the)。Heeres=「軍隊」。 >Krumeich wrote that the Christmas Memorandum had been fabricated to justify a failed strategy and that attrition had been substituted for the capture of Verdun, only after the city was not taken quickly. Foley wrote that after the failure of the Ypres Offensive of 1914, Falkenhayn had returned to the pre-war strategic thinking of Moltke the Elder and Hans Delbrück on Ermattungsstrategie* (attrition strategy), because the coalition fighting Germany was too powerful to be decisively defeated by military means. ⇒クルマイヒはこう書いた。すなわち、クリスマス・メモは、失敗した戦略を正当化するために捏造されたのであり、消耗戦がヴェルダンの攻略と置き換えられたのは、その都市が素早く奪回されなかった時だけである、と。フォーリーは次のように書いた。曰く、1914年のイープル攻撃の失敗の後、ファルケンハインはモルトケ(シニア)やハンス・デルブリュックのエルマトゥンク・ストラテジ*(消耗戦略)という戦前の戦略的考え方に戻したが、それは、ドイツ軍と戦っている連合軍が、自軍(ドイツ軍)の軍力をもって決定的に破るには、あまりに強力だったからである。 *Ermattungsstrategie=Ermattungs「疲労」+strategie「戦略」。人的・物的資源が減っても補充せず、自然減に任せる戦略。いわゆる、「消耗戦略」のこと。

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