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By 11:20 the Romanians had been completely expelled, but with its commander wounded and its units disorganized the 31st Regiment did not pursue, and was content with firing on the retreating defenders from the trenches. The 7th Preslav Regiment meanwhile had been faced with even stronger Romanian fire, and was able to advance only at about 12:00, when its commander, Colonel Dobrev, personally led the assault against a fortification thought by the Bulgarians to be fort 8, but which was actually one of the so-called subcenters of defense that were situated in the gaps between the forts.

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>By 11:20 the Romanians had been completely expelled, but with its commander wounded and its units disorganized the 31st Regiment did not pursue, and was content with firing on the retreating defenders from the trenches. ⇒ルーマニア軍は11時20分までに完全に追い出されたが、司令官が負傷して部隊の組織が乱された第31連隊は彼らを追跡することはせず、塹壕から退却する守備隊に発砲することで満足していた。 >The 7th Preslav Regiment meanwhile had been faced with even stronger Romanian fire, and was able to advance only at about 12:00, when its commander, Colonel Dobrev, personally led the assault against a fortification thought by the Bulgarians to be fort 8, but which was actually one of the so-called subcenters of defense that were situated in the gaps between the forts. ⇒その一方で、第7プレスラフ連隊は一層強いルーマニア軍の砲火に直面し、ようやく12時ごろに進軍することができたが、司令官ドブレフ大佐が個人的に、ブルガリア軍にとっては8番砦であると考えられる要塞に対して、猛攻撃を指図した。しかしそれは、実際は砦と砦の間の隙間に立地した、いわゆる副防衛本部のうちの1つであった。

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