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All the captured arms and equipment were made in Germany, and the camel-pack machine gun company's equipment had been especially designed for desert warfare. Many of the rifles were of the latest pattern and made of rustless steel. Murray estimated the total German and Ottoman casualties at about 9,000, while a German estimate put the loss at one third of the force (5,500 to 6,000), which seems low considering the number of prisoners. The tactics employed by the Anzac Mounted Division were to prove effective throughout the coming campaigns in the Sinai and in the Levant (also known at the time as Palestine).

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>All the captured arms and equipment were made in Germany, and the camel-pack machine gun company's equipment had been especially designed for desert warfare. Many of the rifles were of the latest pattern and made of rustless steel. ⇒押収された武器や機器はすべてドイツ製で、ラクダパック(備え付け)式の機関銃会社製の機器は特に砂漠戦闘用に設計されていた。ライフルの多くは最新型で、錆びのつかないスチール製であった。 >Murray estimated the total German and Ottoman casualties at about 9,000, while a German estimate put the loss at one third of the force (5,500 to 6,000), which seems low considering the number of prisoners. The tactics employed by the Anzac Mounted Division were to prove effective throughout the coming campaigns in the Sinai and in the Levant (also known at the time as Palestine). ⇒マレーは、ドイツ・オスマントルコ軍の死傷者数を、合計で約9,000人と見積もったが、一方ドイツ軍の損失見積りは、軍団の3分の1(5,500人ないし6,000人)であるとした。これは囚人の数を考慮すると低すぎる思われる。アンザック騎馬師団によって用いられた策略は、シナイ半島とレバント地方の次の野戦にわたって効果的であると判明するはずであった(パレスチナ戦の時でも知られた)。

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