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Von Kressenstein succeeded in withdrawing his battered force from a potentially fatal situation; both his advance to Romani and the withdrawal were remarkable achievements of planning, leadership, staff work and endurance. Other sources put the total killed at 202, with all casualties at 1,130, of whom 900 were from the Anzac Mounted Division. Ottoman Army casualties have been estimated to have been 9,000; 1,250 were buried after the battle and 4,000 were taken prisoner. Casualties were cared for by medical officers, stretcher bearers, camel drivers and sand-cart drivers who worked tirelessly, often in the firing line, covering enormous distances in difficult conditions and doing all they could to relieve the suffering of the wounded.

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  • Nakay702
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分かりにくい文章ですので、主語などを補足して再送いたします。 >Von Kressenstein succeeded in withdrawing his battered force from a potentially fatal situation; both his advance to Romani and the withdrawal were remarkable achievements of planning, leadership, staff work and endurance. ⇒フォン・クレッセンシュタインは、自軍の軍団が砲撃されて致命的となる可能性のあった状況から引き戻すことに成功した。彼のロマーニへの進軍と撤退は、計画性、リーダーシップ、指揮の手腕、および耐久力を示す顕著な業績であった。 >Other sources put the total killed at 202, with all casualties at 1,130, of whom 900 were from the Anzac Mounted Division. Ottoman Army casualties have been estimated to have been 9,000; 1,250 were buried after the battle and 4,000 were taken prisoner. ⇒他の情報筋によれば、(英国軍の)死者は合計202名であり、全1,130名の死傷者数のうち900名がアンザック騎馬師団所属であったという。オスマントルコ軍の死傷者数は、9,000名と見積もられている。1,250名が埋葬され、4,000名が囚人となった。 >Casualties were cared for by medical officers, stretcher bearers, camel drivers and sand-cart drivers who worked tirelessly, often in the firing line, covering enormous distances in difficult conditions and doing all they could to relieve the suffering of the wounded. ⇒死傷者は、(両軍とも)精力的に働く医療役員、担架運搬者、ラクダ輸送隊、および砂上輸送車隊の世話を受けたが、しばしば放火の炸裂する戦線内の困難な条件下で広大な距離をカバーし、負傷者の苦しみを取り除くために彼らのできることを全て実行した。

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  • Nakay702
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>Von Kressenstein succeeded in withdrawing his battered force from a potentially fatal situation; both his advance to Romani and the withdrawal were remarkable achievements of planning, leadership, staff work and endurance. Other sources put the total killed at 202, with all casualties at 1,130, of whom 900 were from the Anzac Mounted Division. ⇒フォン・クレッセンシュタインは、自軍の軍団が砲撃されて致命的となる可能性のあった状況から引き戻すことに成功した。彼のロマーニへの進軍と撤退は、計画、リーダーシップ、指揮の手腕、および耐久持続の顕著な業績であった。他の情報筋によれば、死者は合計202名であり、全1,130名の死傷者数のうち900名がアンザック騎馬師団所属であったという。 >Ottoman Army casualties have been estimated to have been 9,000; 1,250 were buried after the battle and 4,000 were taken prisoner. Casualties were cared for by medical officers, stretcher bearers, camel drivers and sand-cart drivers who worked tirelessly, often in the firing line, covering enormous distances in difficult conditions and doing all they could to relieve the suffering of the wounded. ⇒オスマントルコ軍の死傷者数は、9,000名と見積もられている。1,250名が埋葬され、4,000名が囚人となった。死傷者は、精力的に働く医療役員、担架運搬者、ラクダ輸送隊、および砂上輸送車隊の世話を受けたが、しばしば放火炸裂する戦線内、困難な条件下で広大な距離をカバーし、負傷者の苦しみを取り除くために彼らがすることのできること全てを実行した。

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