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The Australian 1st Division reached Albert on 18 July and despite the postponement of the offensive, Gough, who had a reputation as a "thruster", told the division's commander, Major General Harold Walker, "I want you to go in and attack Pozières tomorrow night". Walker, an experienced English officer who had led the division since Gallipoli, would have none of it and insisted he would attack only after adequate preparation. Consequently, the attack on Pozières once more fell in line with the Fourth Army's attack on the night of 22–23 July.

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>The Australian 1st Division reached Albert on 18 July and despite the postponement of the offensive, Gough, who had a reputation as a "thruster", told the division's commander, Major General Harold Walker, "I want you to go in and attack Pozières tomorrow night". ⇒第1オーストラリア軍師団が7月18日アルバートに到着した。「反動推進エンジン」と評されるゴフは、攻撃の延期にもかかわらず、師団の指揮官ハロルド・ウォーカー少将に「明日の夜ポジェールを攻撃して欲しい」と語った。 >Walker, an experienced English officer who had led the division since Gallipoli, would have none of it and insisted he would attack only after adequate preparation. Consequently, the attack on Pozières once more fell in line with the Fourth Army's attack on the night of 22–23 July. ⇒ガリポリから師団を導いてきた経験豊かな英国軍将校ウォーカーのことゆえ、それを受ける気は全然なく、十分な準備の後でのみ攻撃することとしたい旨の主張をした。従って、ポジェールへの攻撃は、改めて、第4方面軍による攻撃で、7月22–23日の夜という日取りになった。

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グーグルクロームでこのサイト開いて英文上で右クリックすると日本語に翻訳(T)とあり クリックすると、、、 以下の文になりました、、 オーストラリアの第一部では7月18日にアルバートに達し、「スラスター」として評判があった攻勢の延期、ゴフ、にもかかわらず、私はあなたがに行くと明日Pozièresを攻撃したい」、部門の司令官、少将ハロルドウォーカーに語りました夜"。ウォーカー、ガリポリ以来部門を率いていた経験のある英語役員は、それのどれも持っていないし、彼が唯一の適切な調製後攻撃する主張であろう。その結果、Pozièresへの攻撃は、もう一度22-23 7月の夜に四軍の攻撃に沿って落ちました。

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