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It was the beginning of the end of the Ottoman Empire and it was the beginning of a Hashemite kingdom whose capital was Mecca. Gradually it expanded northward. This battle left deep scars on the Middle East. Arab states came under strong European influence. The Ottoman caliphate ended and Palestine came under British rule, leading to the eventual existence of the state of Israel. The Sharif of Mecca was himself deposed by the rival Ibn Saud and his dream of an Arabian state stretching from Yemen to Syria remained unrealized.

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それは、オスマン帝国の終焉の始まりであり、首都をメッカとするハシーム王家の始まりだった。その動きは徐々に北に広まった。この戦いは、中東に深い傷跡を残した。 アラブはヨーロッパの影響を強く受けてきた。 オスマン・イスラム帝国が終わり、パレスチナはイギリスの支配を受け、最終的にイスラエル存立へとつながっていった。メッカのシャリフは、対立するイブン・サウジによって追放され、イエメンからシリアへアラブ圏を拡大させるというシャリフの夢は実現しなかった。

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