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Kluck ordered the attack to continue on 24 August, past the west of Maubeuge and that II Corps was to catch up behind the right flank of the army. IX Corps was to advance to the east of Bavai, III Corps was to advance to the west of the village, IV Corps was to advance towards Warnies-le-Grand 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) further to the west and the II Cavalry Corps was to head towards Denain to cut off the British retreat. At dawn the IX Corps resumed its advance and pushed forwards against rearguards until the afternoon when the corps stopped the advance due to uncertainty about the situation on its left flank and the proximity of Maubeuge. At 4:00 p.m. cavalry reports led Quast to resume the advance, which was slowed by the obstacles of Maubeuge and III Corps The staff at Kluck's headquarters, claimed that the two day's fighting had failed to envelop the British due to the subordination of the army to Bülow and the 2nd Army headquarters, which had insisted that the 1st Army keep closer to the western flank, rather than attack to the west of Mons. It was believed that only part of the BEF had been engaged and that there was a main line of defence from Valenciennes to Bavai and Kluck ordered it to be enveloped on 25 August.

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以下のとおりお答えします。「国境の戦い」での、ドイツ軍と英国遠征軍との戦い、および(ドイツ軍の)作戦失敗について述べています。 >Kluck ordered the attack to continue on 24 August, past the west of Maubeuge and that II Corps was to catch up behind the right flank of the army. IX Corps was to advance to the east of Bavai, III Corps was to advance to the west of the village, IV Corps was to advance towards Warnies-le-Grand 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) further to the west and the II Cavalry Corps was to head towards Denain to cut off the British retreat. At dawn the IX Corps resumed its advance and pushed forwards against rearguards until the afternoon when the corps stopped the advance due to uncertainty about the situation on its left flank and the proximity of Maubeuge. ⇒クルックは、8月24日に、モブージュの西を通過して攻撃を続けるように命じた。そして、第2軍団は当該方面軍の右側面の後方に追いつくよう、第9軍団はバヴェの東に進軍するよう、第3軍団はその村の西に進軍するよう、第4軍団は、ワーニ・ル・グラン方向を10km(6.2マイル)西まで進軍するよう、そして、第2騎兵軍団は、ドナンに向かって先頭に立ち、英国の退却を遮断するようにそれぞれ命じた。明け方に、第9軍団は進軍を再開し、午後まで前進して後衛を引き離した。その時、各軍団は、(方面軍の)左側面の状況およびモブージュへの接近度が不確実なゆえに進軍を停止した。 >At 4:00 p.m. cavalry reports led Quast to resume the advance, which was slowed by the obstacles of Maubeuge and III Corps The staff at Kluck's headquarters, claimed that the two day's fighting had failed to envelop the British due to the subordination of the army to Bülow and the 2nd Army headquarters, which had insisted that the 1st Army keep closer to the western flank, rather than attack to the west of Mons. It was believed that only part of the BEF had been engaged and that there was a main line of defence from Valenciennes to Bavai and Kluck ordered it to be enveloped on 25 August. ⇒午後4時、騎兵隊からの情報によって、クヮスト(司令官)は進軍を再開したが、モブージュの障害と第3軍団(のもたつき)のために遅延した。クルック本部の参謀は、2日間に及ぶ戦闘で英国軍の包囲に失敗したのは、軍団がビューローに従ったことに起因すると主張した。というのも、第2軍団の本部が、第1軍団はモンスの西を攻撃するよりも西側面付近に留まるべきだと主張していたのであった。BEF英国遠征軍のほんの一部だけが交戦したこと、主要防衛線がヴァランシェンヌからバヴェにかけて存在したこと、およびクルックがそれを8月25日に包囲するよう命じたこと、などが信じられることであった。

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クルックは、モーブージュの西を過ぎて、第2軍団が軍の右側面に追いつくまで、8月24日も引き続き攻撃を命令した。 第9軍団はババイの東に、第3軍団は村の西に、第4軍団はワーミス・ル・グランの西方10kmに、第2騎兵軍団は英国軍の後退を遮断するようドナンに向かっていた。 夜明けに第9軍団は前進を再開し、午後までに後方の守備軍に追いついた。そして、左側面の状況が不確実でありモーブージュに近いことから進出を停止した。 午後4時、騎兵の索敵情報は、モーブージュの障害物と第3軍団のため進出速度は遅くなっていたクワストに前進を再開させた。 クルックの司令部にいる参謀は、第1軍はモンスの西方を攻撃するよりも西の側面に迫るべきと主張していたが、2日間に及ぶ戦闘はビューローの第2軍司令部が指揮する(ドイツ)軍のために英国軍の援護に失敗した、と結論付けた。 BEF(英国の海外派遣軍)の一部は合流し、ヴァランシェンヌからババイにかけて主要防衛線が存在していると信じられたので、8月25日にクルックは、それら主要防衛線に布陣するよう命令した。

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