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During the afternoon De la Rey was mistakenly shot and killed by a policeman, at a road block set up to look for the Foster gang and many Afrikaners believed that De la Rey had been assassinated. After the funeral the rebels condemned the war but when Botha asked them to volunteer for military service in South-West Africa they accepted. Maritz, at the head of a commando of Union forces on the border of German South-West Africa, allied with the Germans on 7 October and issued a proclamation on behalf of a provisional government and declared war on the British on 9 October. Generals Beyers, De Wet, Maritz, Kemp and Bezuidenhout were to be the first leaders of a new South African Republic. Maritz occupied Keimoes in the Upington area. The Lydenburg commando under General De Wet took possession of the town of Heilbron, held up a train and captured government stores and ammunition. By the end of the week De Wet had a force of 3,000 men and Beyers had gathered c. 7,000 more in the Magaliesberg. General Louis Botha had c. 30,000 pro-government troops. The government declared martial law on 12 October and loyalists under General Louis Botha and Jan Smuts repressed the uprising. Maritz was defeated on 24 October and took refuge with the Germans, the Beyers commando was dispersed at Commissioners Drift on 28 October, after which Beyers joined forces with Kemp and then was drowned in the Vaal River on 8 December. De Wet was captured in Bechuanaland on 2 December and Kemp, having crossed the Kalahari desert and lost 300 of 800 men and most of their horses on the 1,100-kilometre (680 mi) journey, joined Maritz in German South-West Africa and attacked across the Orange river on 22 December. Maritz advanced south again on 13 January 1915 and attacked Upington on 24 January and most of the rebels surrendered on 30 January.

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以下のとおりお答えします。アフリカ反乱軍の蜂起と敗退を述べています。 不明の箇所(第3段落)がありますので回答を躊躇していましたが、このままでは無視と変わりませんので、訂正・補足を期待する意味も込めて、不明のまま投稿することとします。どなたかご教示いただければありがたいです。 >During the afternoon De la Rey was mistakenly shot and killed by a policeman, at a road block set up to look for the Foster gang* and many Afrikaners believed that De la Rey had been assassinated. After the funeral the rebels condemned the war but when Botha asked them to volunteer for military service in South-West Africa they accepted. ⇒デ・ラ・レイは、その日の午後の間に、フォスター一味*を捜すために組まれたバリケード道路上で警察官により間違って射撃され殺害されたが、多くのアフリカナー(南アフリカの白人)が、デ・ラ・レイは暗殺されたのだと信じた。葬式の後に、反乱軍は戦争を非難したけれども、ボータが彼らに南西アフリカの兵役を自発的に申し出るように頼んだ時彼らはそれを受け入れた。 *Foster gang「フォスター一味」:William Robert Clem Fosterをリーダーとする窃盗殺人集団で、1914年7-9月の間南アフリカのヨハネスブルグを中心に銀行等を襲ったが、最後は警察に追い詰められて集団自害した。 >Maritz, at the head of a commando of Union forces on the border of German South-West Africa, allied with the Germans on 7 October and issued a proclamation on behalf of a provisional government and declared war on the British on 9 October. Generals Beyers, De Wet, Maritz, Kemp and Bezuidenhout were to be the first leaders of a new South African Republic. Maritz occupied Keimoes in the Upington area. The Lydenburg commando under General De Wet took possession of the town of Heilbron, held up a train and captured government stores and ammunition. ⇒マリツは、ドイツ領南西アフリカに接する連盟軍の奇襲部隊の頭目として10月7日にドイツ軍と同盟し、臨時政府を代表して声明を出し、10月9日英国軍に宣戦布告した。ベヤース、デ・ヴェット、マリツ、ケンプ、およびベズィデノートの各将軍が、新しい南アフリカ共和国の最初の指導者になることになっていた。マリツは、アピントン地域のケイモスを占有した。デ・ヴェット将軍麾下のライデンブルグ奇襲部隊は、ハイルブロンの町を占領し、列車を強奪し、政府の備蓄用品と弾薬を抑えた。 >By the end of the week De Wet had a force of 3,000 men and Beyers had gathered c. 7,000 more in the Magaliesberg. General Louis Botha had c. 30,000 pro-government troops. The government declared martial law on 12 October and loyalists under General Louis Botha and Jan Smuts repressed the uprising. Maritz was defeated on 24 October and took refuge with the Germans, the Beyers commando was dispersed at Commissioners Drift* on 28 October, after which Beyers joined forces with Kemp and then was drowned in the Vaal River on 8 December. ⇒週末までに、デ・ヴェットは3,000人の軍を持ち、ベヤースはマガリエスブルグにおいて約7,000人以上を集めた。ルイス・ボータ将軍は約30,000人の親政府軍を掌握していた。政府は10月12日に戒厳令を宣言し、ルイス・ボータ将軍とヤン・スマッツ麾下の体制派が暴動を抑制した。マリツは10月24日に破れて、ドイツ軍とともに避難し、ベヤース奇襲部隊は10月28日に コミッショナーズ・ドリフト* に応じて離散した。その後ベヤース軍はケンプと合流したが、12月8日にヴァール川で溺死した。 *Commissioners Drift:内容がよく分かりません。「指揮官・委員〔会〕の流れ・潮流」とか「任官・弁務官の意向・趣意〔書〕」などに近い意味かも知れませんし、単なる地名の別称(あだ名)であるという可能性もあります。とにかくこの文脈の範囲では、訳語を特定できないように思います。ということで、おざなりなやり方ですが、とりあえず不明のまま、ただカタカナに置き換えておきました。 >De Wet was captured in Bechuanaland on 2 December and Kemp, having crossed the Kalahari desert and lost 300 of 800 men and most of their horses on the 1,100-kilometre (680 mi) journey, joined Maritz in German South-West Africa and attacked across the Orange river on 22 December. Maritz advanced south again on 13 January 1915 and attacked Upington on 24 January and most of the rebels surrendered on 30 January. ⇒デ・ヴェットは、12月2日にベチュアナランドにおいて捕縛され、ケンプは、カラハリ砂漠を横断する1,100キロメートル(680マイル)の旅の途中で800人の兵のうち300人とほとんどの馬を失ったが、ドイツ領南西アフリカのマリツに合流して、12月22日にオレンジ川の対岸を攻撃した。マリツは、1915年1月13日に再度南へ進軍して1月24日にアピントンを攻撃したが、1月30日ほとんどの反乱軍が降服した。

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  • 英文を訳して下さい。

    General Maritz, who was head of a commando of Union forces on the border of German South-West Africa, allied himself with the Germans. He then issued a proclamation on behalf of a provisional government. It stated that "the former South African Republic and Orange Free State as well as the Cape Province and Natal are proclaimed free from British control and independent, and every White inhabitant of the mentioned areas, of whatever nationality, are hereby called upon to take their weapons in their hands and realize the long-cherished ideal of a Free and Independent South Africa." It was announced that Generals Beyers, de Wet, Maritz, Kemp and Bezuidenhout were to be the first leaders of this provisional government. Maritz's forces occupied Keimoes in the Upington area. The Lydenburg commando under General De Wet took possession of the town of Heilbron, held up a train and captured government stores and ammunition. Some of the prominent citizens of the area joined him, and by the end of the week he had a force of 3,000 men. Beyers also gathered a force in the Magaliesberg; in all, about 12,000 rebels rallied to the cause. The irony was that General Louis Botha had around 32,000 troops to counter the rebels and of the 32,000 troops about 20,000 of them were Afrikaners. The government declared martial law on 12 October 1914, and forces loyal to the government under the command of General Louis Botha and Jan Smuts proceeded to destroy the rebellion. General Maritz was defeated on 24 October and took refuge with the Germans. The Beyers commando was attacked and dispersed at Commissioners Drift on 28 October, after which Beyers joined forces with Kemp, but drowned in the Vaal River on 8 December. General de Wet was captured in Bechuanaland on 1 December 1914, with 52 others on a farm called Waterbury. His remark when captured was: "Thank God it was not an Englishman who captured me after all". His grandson, Dr Carel de Wet [de], then Minister of Health, consecrated a monument at this spot on 14 February 1970. General Kemp, having taken his commando across the Kalahari desert, losing 300 out of 800 men and most of their horses on the 1,100 kilometre month-long trek, joined Maritz in German South-West Africa, but returned after about a week and surrendered on 4 February 1915. After the Maritz rebellion was suppressed, the South African army continued their operations into German South West Africa and conquered it by July 1915. Compared to the fate of the ringleaders of the Easter Rising in Ireland in 1916, the leading Boer rebels got off relatively lightly with terms of imprisonment of six and seven years and heavy fines. Two years later they were released from prison, as Louis Botha recognised the value of reconciliation. One notable exception was Jopie Fourie, a Union Defence Force officer who had failed to resign his commission before joining the rebellion, who was executed.

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