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次の英文の和訳をお願いします。

Depending on a patient's specific medical condition, physicians will either admit the patient to the hospital, discharge the patient, or transfer the patient to a more appropriate medical facility. If you are discharged, you will receive discharge instructions (either written specifically for you or pre-printed) that explain your medications and other treatments. If medications are prescribed, you may receive a beginning dose if there are no pharmacies open in your area at that particular time. You will also be referred for follow-up care should your condition continue or worsen. You may need to be transferred if your condition is better treated at another institution. You may have to sign a consent form if your condition or mental state allows. The modern emergency department performs an important role in our society. It really is a marvelous invention that has saved countless lives. Hopefully, the information in this article will help ease your fears should you need the services of an emergency department in the future. For more information on emergency departments, medical conditions and related topics, check out the links on the next page.

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  • Nakay702
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以下のとおりお答えします。 患者の具体的な医療条件によって、医師は患者に入院を認めるか、退院(解放)させるか、またはより適切な医療施設に転院させることになるでしょう。 もしあなたが解放されるならば、あなた用の医薬品や他の治療を説明する解放手順(あなたのために特別に書かれるか、またはあらかじめ印刷されているもの)を受け取ることでしょう。もし医薬品が処方されても、その特定時間に開いている薬局があなたの地域にないならば、最初の一服分はそこで受け取ることができるでしょう。あなたはまた、然るべき状況の継続のために守るべき指示を、いや、守らなければ悪化するような指示を、受け取ることになります。 もし、別の機関の方があなたの状況をより適切に対処できるようならば、あなたは転院を求めてもよいでしょう。あなたの状況や精神状態が許すなら、あなたは同意書(承諾書)に署名しなければならないかも知れません。 現代の救急部門は、私達の社会の重要な役割を担っています。数え切れないほどの生命を救ってきたことは、実に驚くべき創造力(の賜物)です。希望的観測ですが、もし未来のあなたが救急部門のサービスを必要とすることにでもなったときは、この記事の情報が、あなたの恐怖を弱めるのに役立つことでしょう。 救急部門、医学の諸状況および関連トピックスなどに関するさらなる情報については、次ページのリンクをチェックしてください。 以上、ご回答まで

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関連するQ&A

  • 次の英文の和訳をお願いしたいです。

    Million­s of Americans visit an emergency room each year. Millions more have seen the hit TV show "ER." This­ has sparked an almost insatiable interest in the fascinating, 24-hour-a-day, non-stop world of emergency medicine.A visit to the emergency room can be a stressful, scary event. Why is it so scary? First of all, there is the fear of not knowing what is wrong with you. There is the fear of having to visit an unfamiliar place filled with people you have never met. Also, you may have to undergo tests that you do not understand at a pace that discourages questions and comprehension. In this article, Dr. Carl Bianco leads you through a complete behind-the-scenes tour of a typical emergency room. You will learn about the normal flow of traffic in an emergency room, the people involved and the special techniques used to respond to life-or-death situations. If you yourself find the need to visit an emergency room, this article will make it less stressful by revealing what will happen and why things happen the way they do in an emergency. One of the most amazing aspects of emergency medicine is the huge range of conditions that arrive on a daily basis. No other speciality in medicine sees the variety of conditions that an emergency room physician sees in a typical week. Some of the conditions that bring people to the emergency room include: •Car accidents •Sports injuries •Broken bones and cuts from accidents and falls •Burns •Uncontrolled bleeding •Heart attacks, chest pain •Difficulty breathing, asthma attacks, pneumonia •Strokes, loss of function and/or numbness in arms or legs •Loss of vision, hearing •Unconsciousness •Confusion, altered level of consciousness, fainting •Suicidal or homicidal thoughts •Overdoses •Severe abdominal pain, persistent vomiting •Food poisoning •Blood when vomiting, coughing, urinating, or in bowel movements •Severe allergic reactions from insect bites, foods or medications •Complications from diseases, high fevers The classic emergency room scene involves an ambulance screeching to a halt, a gurney hurtling through the hallway and five people frantically working to save a person's life with only seconds to spare. This does happen and is not uncommon, but the majority of cases seen in a typical emergency department aren't quite this dramatic. Let's look at a typical case to see how the normal flow of an emergency room works. Imagine that it's 2 a.m., and you're dreaming about whatever it is that you dream about. Suddenly you wake up because your abdomen hurts -- a lot. This seems like something out of the ordinary, so you call your regular doctor. He tells you to go to your local hospital's emergency department: He is concerned about appendicitis because your pain is located in the right, lower abdomen. When you arrive at the Emergency Department, your first stop is triage. This is the place where each patient's condition is prioritized, typically by a nurse, into three general categories. The categories are: •Immediately life threatening •Urgent, but not immediately life threatening •Less urgent This categorization is necessary so that someone with a life-threatening condition is not kept waiting because they arrive a few minutes later than someone with a more routine problem. The triage nurse records your vital signs (temperature, pulse, respiratory rate and blood pressure). She also gets a brief history of your current medical complaints, past medical problems, medications and allergies so that she can determine the appropriate triage category. Here you find out that your temperature is 101 degrees F.

  • 次の英文の和訳をお願いします。

    Millions of Americans visit an emergency room each year. Millions more have seen the hit TV show "ER." This has sparked an almost insatiable interest in the fascinating, 24-hour-a-day, non-stop world of emergency medicine.A visit to the emergency room can be a stressful, scary event. Why is it so scary? First of all, there is the fear of not knowing what is wrong with you. There is the fear of having to visit an unfamiliar place filled with people you have never met. Also, you may have to undergo tests that you do not understand at a pace that discourages questions and comprehension. In this article, Dr. Carl Bianco leads you through a complete behind-the-scenes tour of a typical emergency room. You will learn about the normal flow of traffic in an emergency room, the people involved and the special techniques used to respond to life-or-death situations. If you yourself find the need to visit an emergency room, this article will make it less stressful by revealing what will happen and why things happen the way they do in an emergency. One of the most amazing aspects of emergency medicine is the huge range of conditions that arrive on a daily basis. No other speciality in medicine sees the variety of conditions that an emergency room physician sees in a typical week. Some of the conditions that bring people to the emergency room include: •Car accidents •Sports injuries •Broken bones and cuts from accidents and falls •Burns •Uncontrolled bleeding •Heart attacks, chest pain •Difficulty breathing, asthma attacks, pneumonia •Strokes, loss of function and/or numbness in arms or legs •Loss of vision, hearing •Unconsciousness •Confusion, altered level of consciousness, fainting •Suicidal or homicidal thoughts •Overdoses •Severe abdominal pain, persistent vomiting •Food poisoning •Blood when vomiting, coughing, urinating, or in bowel movements •Severe allergic reactions from insect bites, foods or medications •Complications from diseases, high fevers The classic emergency room scene involves an ambulance screeching to a halt, a gurney hurtling through the hallway and five people frantically working to save a person's life with only seconds to spare. This does happen and is not uncommon, but the majority of cases seen in a typical emergency department aren't quite this dramatic. Let's look at a typical case to see how the normal flow of an emergency room works. Imagine that it's 2 a.m., and you're dreaming about whatever it is that you dream about. Suddenly you wake up because your abdomen hurts -- a lot. This seems like something out of the ordinary, so you call your regular doctor. He tells you to go to your local hospital's emergency department: He is concerned about appendicitis because your pain is located in the right, lower abdomen. When you arrive at the Emergency Department, your first stop is triage. This is the place where each patient's condition is prioritized, typically by a nurse, into three general categories. The categories are: •Immediately life threatening •Urgent, but not immediately life threatening •Less urgent This categorization is necessary so that someone with a life-threatening condition is not kept waiting because they arrive a few minutes later than someone with a more routine problem. The triage nurse records your vital signs (temperature, pulse, respiratory rate and blood pressure). She also gets a brief history of your current medical complaints, past medical problems, medications and allergies so that she can determine the appropriate triage category. Here you find out that your temperature is 101 degrees F.

  • 次の英文の和訳をお願いします!!

    In almost every TV show about an emergency room you probably see an ambulance screeching to a stop with its lights flashing , a gurney being rushed through the corridors and emergency staff racing against time to save a person's kife with only seconds to spare. This scene is possible and occasionally happends , but most of he cases that a typical emergency department sees aren't so dramatic. Let's look at how an ordinary case goes through the normal flow of an emergency room. When patients arrive at the Emergency Department , they go to triage first. In triage , each patient's condition is prioritized , typically by a nurse. She puts the patient into one of three general categories. The categories are: ・Immediately life-threatening ・Urgent , but not immediately life-threatening ・Less urgent Categorizing patients is necessary so that someone with a life-threatening condition doesn't have to wait to get care. The triage nurse records the vital sugns (temperature , pulse , respiratory rate , and blood pressure). She also takes a brief history of the patient's current medical complaints , past medical problems , medications and allergies. From this information , the nurse can decide which triage category is suitable. Registration is the next stage in the ER process. A TV show rarely lets us see this part. It's not exciting , but it is very important. This is where the hospital collexts the patient's personal details and insurance information. Registration is needed to create a clear medical record so that the patient's medical history , lab tests , X-rays , etc. , will all be put on his or her medical chart. That chart can then be checked by doctors , nurses and other medical staff when necessary. Also , this information will be important for creating the hospital bill. If the patient has a life-threatening situation or arrives by ambulance , the registration stage might be done later at the beside. Finally , the patient comes to the exam room. The nurse has the person put on a patient gown so that an examination can be done properly. She might also collect a urine specimen at this time. After the nurse's tasks are fished , the emergency-medicine physician meets with the patient. The physician asks questions t create a more detailed medical history about the present illness , past medical problems , family history , social history , and also takes a close look at all the patient's physical systems. The physician then formulates a list of possible causes of the patient's symptoms. This is called a differential diagnosis. The most likely diagnosis is then determined by th patient's symptoms and the physical examination. If this stage is not enough to create a clear diagnosis , then further diagnostic testa are done.

  • 次の英文の和訳をお願いします。

    When the tricky diagnosis of appendicitis is considered, blood tests and a urinalysis are required. The patient's blood is put into different colored tubes, each with its own additive depending on the test being performed: •A purple-top tube is used for a complete blood count (CBC). A CBC measures: 1) The adequacy of your red blood cells, to see if you are anemic. 2) The number and type of white blood cells (WBCs), to determine the presence of infection. 3) A platelet count (platelets are a blood component necessary for clotting) •A red-top tube is used to test the serum (the liquid or non-cellular half of your blood). •A blue-top tube is used to test your blood's clotting. The tests in your case indicate that you have an elevated WBC count. This is a sign of a bacterial infection, and bacterial infections are commonly associated with appendicitis. At this point, the emergency physician may request that you not eat or drink anything. The reason is that appendicitis is treated by surgery, and an empty stomach is desirable to prevent some complications of anesthesia. When the emergency physician has all the information he can obtain, he makes a determination of the most likely diagnosis from his differential diagnosis. Alternately, he may decide that he does not have enough information to make a decision and may require more tests. At this point, he speaks to a general surgeon -- the appropriate consultant in this case. The surgeon comes to see you and performs a thorough history, physical exam, and review of your lab data. She examines your symptoms: pain and tenderness in the right, lower abdomen, vomiting, low-grade fever and elevated WBC count. These symptoms all point to appendicitis. The treatment of appendicitis is removal of the appendix, or an appendectomy. The surgeon explains the procedure, including the risks and benefits. You then sign a consent form to document this and permit her to operate on you. The vast array of people caring for patients in an emergency department can be quite confusing to the average health care consumer -- as confusing as if you were watching your first baseball game ever and no one was around to explain all those players. Additionally, most people are uncertain of the training and background necessary to become a member of the emergency-department team. Well, here's the scorecard. The emergency physician comes to the team after spending four years in college studying hard to get as high a GPA (grade point average) as possible in order to get accepted into medical school. Medical school is a four-year course of study covering all the essentials of becoming a physician. It generally includes two years of classroom time, followed by two years rotating through all the different specialties of medicine. Toward the end of medical school, each medical student must select a particular specialty (emergency medicine, family practice, internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, etc.). The medical student then completes an internship (one year) and residency (two to three additional years) in order to be a specialist in emergency medicine. Physicians must pass an all-day written exam and an all-day oral exam to become board certified in emergency medicine. As of 2001, there were approximately 32,000 emergency physicians practicing in the United States, of which 17,000 were certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine.

  • 英文の和訳をお願いします!!

    In almost every TV show about an emergency room you probably see an ambulance screeching to a stop with its lights flashing , a gurney being rushed through the corridors and emergency staff racing against time to save a person's kife with only seconds to spare. This scene is possible and occasionally happends , but most of he cases that a typical emergency department sees aren't so dramatic. Let's look at how an ordinary case goes through the normal flow of an emergency room. When patients arrive at the Emergency Department , they go to triage first. In triage , each patient's condition is prioritized , typically by a nurse. She puts the patient into one of three general categories. The categories are: ・Immediately life-threatening ・Urgent , but not immediately life-threatening ・Less urgent Categorizing patients is necessary so that someone with a life-threatening condition doesn't have to wait to get care. The triage nurse records the vital sugns (temperature , pulse , respiratory rate , and blood pressure). She also takes a brief history of the patient's current medical complaints , past medical problems , medications and allergies. From this information , the nurse can decide which triage category is suitable. Registration is the next stage in the ER process. A TV show rarely lets us see this part. It's not exciting , but it is very important. This is where the hospital collexts the patient's personal details and insurance information. Registration is needed to create a clear medical record so that the patient's medical history , lab tests , X-rays , etc. , will all be put on his or her medical chart. That chart can then be checked by doctors , nurses and other medical staff when necessary. Also , this information will be important for creating the hospital bill. If the patient has a life-threatening situation or arrives by ambulance , the registration stage might be done later at the beside. Finally , the patient comes to the exam room. The nurse has the person put on a patient gown so that an examination can be done properly. She might also collect a urine specimen at this time. After the nurse's tasks are fished , the emergency-medicine physician meets with the patient. The physician asks questions t create a more detailed medical history about the present illness , past medical problems , family history , social history , and also takes a close look at all the patient's physical systems. The physician then formulates a list of possible causes of the patient's symptoms. This is called a differential diagnosis. The most likely diagnosis is then determined by th patient's symptoms and the physical examination. If this stage is not enough to create a clear diagnosis , then further diagnostic testa are done.

  • 次の英文を和訳していただけませんでしょうか?

    Thank you for your email regarding the following enquiries: 1. cost for having a contract with a mobile SIM card or mobile service. 2. if you can use a Japanese smart phone. 3. if you can use Japanese language in a contract. I am pleased to assist you with your enquiries. If you will be having a contract with Telstra postpaid mobile service, the cost of the contract will depend on the monthly spend or mobile plan that you will choose. For more information on our mobile plans, you may access the link at http://www.telstra.com.au/mobile/plans/ On the other hand, if you will be connecting to Telstra's pre-paid services, you may opt to purchase either a $2 SIM only Starter Kit or a $30 Telstra Pre-Paid Starter Kit (both of which will contain a new number) from a participating Telstra Shop or partner. The $30 Telstra Pre-Paid Starter Kit comes with $30 credit to use in 30 days while the $2 SIM only Starter Kit does not have a bonus credit. You can also purchase a Starter Kit online at telstra.com (delivery charges apply). However, we are unable to deliver it overseas. We only deliver it within Australia. Nevertheless, if you have relatives or friends in Australia, you may ask them to purchase the SIM card in Australia and have it shipped to you. For more information on our Telstra Pre-Paid Starter Kits, you may access the link at http://www.telstra.com.au/mobile/prepaid/gettingstarted.html To find the nearest Telstra Store, you may access the link at http://telstra.com.au/shoplocator/ As for our pre-paid offers, you may choose among our offers by accessing the link at http://www.telstra.com.au/mobile/prepaid/prepaid-offers/ Once you have purchased a Starter Kit, you may ask the consultant at the Telstra Shop to have your new SIM card activated. Regarding your second enquiry above, any smart phone works well on Telstra's network. As for the third enquiry above, English is the medium of communication for Telstra. Nevertheless our consultants at the Telstra Shop may be able to assist you with in translating any contract with Telstra to Japanese. Should you need further assistance regarding your pre-paid service, please do not hesitate to email us back or call our Telstra Pre-paid Support Team by dialing the Australia Direct Reverse Charge access number for the country you are in and ask the Telstra operator for assistance .If you are experiencing difficulties connecting to the Australia Direct service via the listed Access Numbers, please call the local operator and ask for a reverse charge call to Australia 61 3 9632 6062. Our Telstra Pre-paid Support Team is open twenty-four (24) hours and seven (7) days a week, to assist you. For further information on Reverse Charge Call, please access the links below: http://telstra.com.au/homephone/docs/aust_direct_rev_charge_ad041_1105.pdf http://telstra.com.au/homephone/call_types_rates/reverse_charge.html Kind Regards, Renan Telstra Support Team

  • 英文の和訳

    和訳していただけるかたのみで お願いできますでしょうか? 先ほどのが1段落の前半で こちらが後半となります。 どうぞよろしくお願いいたします It can also rule love affairs that are made on the rebound after a failed or painful relationship. Because of the strength of mars in the chart, the marriage or relationship. This love will bring a new independence to your life, this will include a financial independence. You will love him but money, the lure of luxury and desire for financial independence, or to better your self and end financial struggles will be one of the reasons that make marriage to this man appeal, or makes it possible. Though it may not bring vast wealth, it will bring independence. But you may first have to struggle, or get over a hurdle to with breaking free to attain this.

  • 英文の和訳

    英文を和訳していただけるかた のみでお願いできますでしょうか? 1段落の前半部分となります。 どうぞよろしくお願いいたします。 The sun fell in your twelfth celestial house at birth, this is also the house of the hidden. It means that your soul mate will be a man of obscurity, or if he has power it will be behind the scenes. Not an open status. He may have hidden ambitions and aims in life to do with his Career. He will rise out of difficulty and obscurity. To become someone more important The love will be one that helps you overcome personal obstacles, inhibitions, or things that have got in the way of finding love before. It’s a love that l is like a light on a dark lonely road,, compelling like a distant flame that never goes out, it can seem to help you find the way ahead in your life, or help you carry on. It will make all the things you have struggled against in the past worthwhile.

  • 英文の和訳

    英文を和訳していただけるかたのみで、 お願いできますでしょうか? 3つの段落になっています。 どうぞよろしくお願いいたします But what else? You may think I have told you all you could possibly want to know. It isn’t so. SOUL MATE TWO, is the same length and just as detailed as soul mate one, it follows a similar pattern, if you loved this reading you will love Soul Mate Two. Astrology is a bit like archaeology in that each additional reading on the same subject we must dig into a deeper layer of the chart and more time and work is involved. SOUL MATE THREE, if you still want more, if your spirit still has a hunger to taste the romance in your future. If it wants to look again into the mirror of time. Then Soul Mate Three is the last of these readings, it will reveal anything that is not covered in soul mate one or two. I cannot tell more than that because I never know what it will show in your particular reading until I look at your own chart, Again it is deeply penetrating and more difficult to do, because each time we look we have to go deeper it take a bit longer. May they bring love light and enlightenment into your spirit.

  • 英文の和訳

    英文の和訳をしていただけるかた のみで、お願いできますでしょうか? 抽象的かもしれませんが どうぞよろしくお願いいたします。 Venus rules your seventh house and was in Virgo. This means you will set you heart on your soul mate, you will marry him for love. Virgo can be extreme, either very virginal or very passionate, and usually both, because their love is given totally and completely, mind body and spirit, but to only to one much idealized person. In love you are patient, devoted, choosy, and with high morals, or a natural detachment, an emotional self control that is not conducive to relationships.