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日本語訳を教えて下さい。

この英文の意味を教えて下さい。 Again, there are clues and stories that seem to be throwing some light. For instance, many kinds of birds are known to use star maps. In the early weeks of life the baby birds sit in their nets and study the night sky- and are somewhat confused if those early weeks are too cloudy. But they do not, as human amateur astronomers might do , spend their time learning the individual constellations - how to recognize Orion or trace the fanciful outline of Taurus, or whatever. Instead, they focus on the part that does not move as the night progress, which in the Northern Hemisphere means the North Star. They can see, if they look at it long enough, that as the night progresses, all the stars in the sky, including the mighty Orion and the notional Taurus, seem to revolve around the Pole Star, which sits in the middle like the central part of a giant cartwheel Once they recognize the central part, the most fundamental problem is solved. The creature that can do this knows where north is and everything else can be figured out. I don't know what the equivalent would be in the Southern Hemisphere, but undoubtedly there is one. Navigation simply does not seem to need the details of astronomy.

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さらに、幾分、光を投げかけている様に思える手掛かりや話があります。 例えば、多くの種類の鳥が、星図を使うことが知られています。 生まれてから最初の数週間、ヒナドリは、巣の中にいて、夜空を熱心に観察します ― それで、この最初の数週間が、曇り空の夜が多すぎると、幾分、混乱します。 しかし、彼らは、人間のアマチュア天文家がするように、個々の星座を覚えること ― すなわち、オリオン座の見つけ方とか、おうし座の風変わりな輪郭をたどったりして ― 時間を費やすわけではありません。 その代わりに、彼らは、夜に時間が経過しても動かない部分に集中します、この部分は、北半球では、北極星を意味します。 十分長く見つめていれば、夜の時間が経過するにつれて、夜空の全ての星が、力強いオリオン座や幻想的なおうし座を含めて、北極星の周りを回転しているように見えることが、彼らには、分かるのです、つまり、この北極星は、巨大な車輪の中心の様に、中央に位置しているのです。 ひとたび、彼らがこの中心部分に気付けば、最も基本的な問題は、解決します。 このことを行える生き物は、どこが北か分かります、そうすれば、他の全ては、理解できるのです。 南半球で(北極星と)同じ働きをするものが何か、私は、知りませんが、きっと存在するはずです。 飛行術には、とにかく、詳細な天文学は必要ではないように思えます。

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