• ベストアンサー
  • すぐに回答を!

日本語訳を!

お願いします (7) Egyptian art students learned the fundamentals of the sacred ratio by first drawing a grid that turned the work surface into a graph. They then could apply the proportions to almost anything―jewelry, hieroglyphs, pyramids, and architecture. The sacred ratio was so important to Egyptians they believed that tombs not following the proportions prevented the deceased from going to the afterlife and temples not built according to the rules would displease the gods. Pleasing mathematical proportions in art and architecture are not the only thing moderns have borrowed and built on from the ancient Egyptians. Many of our modern tales have their roots in Egyptian literature. Do you recognize parts of this story? (8) Once upon a time there was a young maiden named Rhodopis who was kidnapped by pirates and sold to a kind, old Egyptian. The old man spent his days sleeping under a tree, so he didn't know that the other servant girls in his house were mean to Rhodopis. (9) "Rhodopis, fetch the wood. Weed the garden, Rhodopis. Clean the stable. Wash the clothes. Mend my robe, Rhodopis." The chores continued from dawn to dusk. The servant girl's only friends were the animals. When she washed the clothes at the riverbank, Hippopotamus slid up the mud in incline to be near her. When she weeded the garden, Monkey climbed down the tree to sit by her side. And at the end of the day, Rhodopis sang and danced for her animal friends.

共感・応援の気持ちを伝えよう!

  • 回答数2
  • 閲覧数167
  • ありがとう数1

質問者が選んだベストアンサー

  • ベストアンサー
  • 回答No.2
  • sayshe
  • ベストアンサー率77% (4555/5903)

(7) エジプトの美術の学生は、最初に作品の表面をグラフの様にする格子を引くことで、神聖な比率の基礎を学びました。 そうすると、彼らはその比率を ― 宝石、ヒエログリフ、ピラミッド、建築 ― と言った、ほとんどどんな物にでも応用することができました。 神聖な比率は、エジプト人にとって大変重要だったので、彼らは、その比率に従わない墓は死者が来世に行くのを妨げる、その規則に従って建てられていない神殿は神々を不快にする、と信じているほどでした。美術や建築の心地よい数学的比率は、古代エジプト人から現代人が借りてそれを基礎に築き上げた唯一のものではありません。 我々の現代の物語の多くは、エジプトの文学にその起源があります。 あなたは、次の物語のいくつかの部分に心当たりがありますか?   (8) 昔々、海賊にさらわれて、親切な年寄りのエジプト人に売られたロードピスという名の若い娘がいました。その老人は毎日木の下で眠って過ごしたので、彼の家の他の召使の娘たちが、ロードピスに意地悪なのを知りませんでした。 (9) 「ロードピス、薪を取って来なさい。 ロードピス、庭の雑草を抜きなさい。 納屋を掃除しなさい。 服を洗濯しなさい。 ロードピス、私の服を繕いなさい。」雑用は、夜明けから夕暮れまで続きました。 その召使の娘の友達は、動物たちだけでした。 彼女が川岸で服を洗濯していると、カバたちが、斜面の泥を滑って彼女の近くにやって来ました。 彼女が庭の雑草を抜いていると、猿が木から下りてきて彼女のそばに座りました。 そして、一日の終わりには、ロードピスは、彼女の動物の友達のために歌ったり、踊ったりしました。

共感・感謝の気持ちを伝えよう!

質問者からのお礼

ありがとうございます。

関連するQ&A

  • 日本語訳を!

    お願いします (4) Artists almost never signed their work. The art was not about the artist. Artists were not innovators, they were craftsmen, and as you can tell from their Middle Kingdom titles, they were more closely related to scribes than to the "artist" types we think of today. That's not to say Egyptian artists weren't talented. Oe sculptor created two life-size sculptures of a high priest and his princess wife that were so realistic they scared off tomb robbers. The stone eyes implanted in the statues appeared to watch the thieves, and frightened them so badly that they dropped their tools and ran. (5) Perhaps what contributed to the tomb robbers' fear was the Egyptian belief that art had magic. Often you will see crocodiles, hippos, and snakes drawn with spears sticking out of them. If a crocodile suddenly came to life right next to you, you would probably appreciate the spear. And since these murals were one day going to become a reality, it's nice that the banquet scene has plates piled high with delicious food. (6) It must have been the attention to rules that led Egyptian artists to discover the "sacred ratio." The proportions in the sacred ratio repeat throughout the natural world. Plants, flowers, and trees grow in the sacred ratio. Sunflowers, pinecones, and the nautilus shell spiral according to the sacred ratio. The earth and the moon measure, and the galaxies spin―all to this sacred proportion. Egyptian artists drew the human body according to the sacred ratio, in the same way modern artists do today.

  • 日本語訳を!

    お願いします (10) It is not surprising that Rhodopis enjoyed music. Tombs and temple walls are covered with images of dancers and musicians. There were percussion instruments―drums, cymbals, and tambourines. There were wind instruments―flutes and trumpets. And there were stringed instruments―harps, lyres, and lutes. Everyone enjoyed music, from the pharaoh to the field worker. No one loved a festival more than the Egyptians. Crowds sang and clpped along with the musicians who paraded through the streets. Dancers performed for the revelers, moving with the grace of gymnasts―cartwheeling, twirling, flipping, and gyrating to the rhythm. Music and dance were integral to Egyptian daily life. Workers labored to the beat, priests praised the gods in music and motion. Musicians and dancers entertained at banquests and ushered the dead at funerals. So, for a young servant girl to sing to the animals at day's end is not surprising at all. (11) Rhodopis twirled so lightly her feet barely grazed the ground. Unknown to Rhodopis, she was dancing near the tree where the old man slept and her movement woke him. He was so taken by her grace that he decided right then and there that her feet should have the finest shoes in the kingdom. "He ordered her a special pair of slippers. The shoes were gilded with rose-red gold and the soles were leather. Now the servant girls really disliked her for they were jealous of her beautiful slippers." (12) News traveled to their village that the king was having a party. The entire kingdom was invited. On the day of the party the servant girls put on their finest clothes. They gave Rhodopis a long list of chores and handed her mounds of laundry to be washed in the river. They laughed at her washing the clothes as they poled down the river to the king's banquet.

  • 日本語訳を!!

    お願いします (6) Cleopatra went to the palace school with theother royal princes and princesses. She became fluent in nine languages and was the first member of her family who could speak Egyptian. Cleopatra had tremendous appeal. Even the Greek biographer Plutarch, who disapproved of her behavior, describes her in glowing terms: “The charm of her presence was irresistible, but there was an attraction in her person and conversation, together with a force of character, which showed in her every word and action. Everyone who met her fell under her spell.” (7) When Ptolemy died in 51 BCE, he left his kingdom to the 18-year-old Cleopatra. Even though she was old enough to rule, according to Egyptian law, she couldn't rule alone. Ptolemy's will set up joint rule by Cleopatra and her 12-year-old brother, Ptolemy X III. (8) According to Egyptian tradition, pharaohs married their siblings or children to keep sower within the royal family. Cleopatra had to marry a brother or a son, and this consort would be her official husband. It would be a marriage of politics, not love. Cleopatra had no sons when she came to the throne, so her first co-ruler was Ptolemy XIII. (9) Cleopatra and Ptolemy ruled together for several years, but Cleopatra wasn't very good at sharing. She left her brother's name out of official documents─on purpose─and had her own picture and name stamped on Egyptian coins. This didn't go over very well with Ptolemy. Nor did it please the court officials of Alexandria, the capital city. (10) Alexandria's officials decided that Ptolemy would be easier to control than Cleopatra. so they plotted to overthrow the strong-willed queen. Knowing that her life was in danger, Cleopatra escaped to Syria, where she raised an army to help her regain power.

その他の回答 (1)

  • 回答No.1
  • poomen
  • ベストアンサー率34% (784/2278)

(7)エジプト美術学生最初のグラフに作業面を向けたグリッドを描画することによって神聖比率の基礎を学んだ。そして、彼らはほとんど何でも-宝石、象形文字、ピラミッド、およびアーキテクチャに割合を適用することができます。神聖な比率は、彼らが割合に従っていない墓は神を不愉快にするであろうルールに従って構築されていません死後の世界やお寺に行くから故人を防ぐと信じられ、エジプト人にとって非常に重要だった。芸術および建築の数学比率を喜ばせることは現代人が借りて古代エジプト人から上に構築された唯一のものではありません。私たちの現代の物語の多くはエジプト文学にそのルーツを持っている。あなたはこの物語の部分を認識するか? (8)むかしむかしの海賊に誘拐され、親切に売却されたRhodopis、古いエジプトの若き乙女があった。老人は木の下で眠っている彼の日を過ごしたので、彼は彼の家の中で他のサーバントの女の子がRhodopisに意味されたことを知りませんでした。 (9) "Rhodopis、木材をフェッチします。ウィード庭、Rhodopisが安定してきれいにしてください。服を洗う。私のローブ、Rhodopisメンド。 " 家事は夜明けから夕暮れまで続いた。女中の唯一の友人は動物だった。彼女は川岸で服を洗ったら、カバは彼女の近くにいるのが傾斜で泥を滑らせた。彼女は庭を淘汰すると、猿は彼女の側に座って木を降りた。そして一日の終わりに、Rhodopisは歌い、彼女の動物の友人のために踊っていました。

共感・感謝の気持ちを伝えよう!

関連するQ&A

  • 日本語訳を!

    お願いします (6) The Hyksos army was made up of professional soldiers. They drove chariots, wore body armor and leather helmets, and wielded bows designed to shoot arrows farther than ordinary wooden bows. It's no surprise that the Hyksos beat the Egyptians in those first battles. But the Egyptians learned from the encounters. They stole the ddsign of the chariot from the Hyksos and then improved upon it. The Egyptians made the chariot lighter. The redesign positioned the driver over the axle and they covered the wooden axle with metal so that it turned more smoothly. These changes made it easier for the horse to pull the chariot. The driver stood, holding onto straps for balance, with a soldier at his side. The soldier held a shield and was armed with a bow and arrows, a sword, and a javelin. The back of the chariot was open so that the charioteers could jump out with ease and engage in hand-to-hand combat with the enemy. (7) The Egyptians trained. They held battle competitions in front of the king. Archers shot at targets. Wrestlers grappled with one another. Swordsmen clashed blades. What had once been a rag-tag scrabble of men became an organized military. But they still had work to do on their style of waging war. Before a battle, the Egyptians notified the enemy which day they planned to attack and where. If the enemy wasn't ready, the Egyptians rescheduled. And if the enemy retreated into their fortress, rather than rudely barging in, the Egyptians would patiently wait outside hoping to starve them out. Unfortunately, Egypt's enemies weren't always as courteous.

  • 日本語訳を!

    お願いします (10) The village chief greets the Egyptian traders with the question: "How have you arrived at this land unknown to the men of Egypt? Have you come down from the roads of the Heavens?" The chief's wife and children accompany him. The Egyptians give the natives gifts of beads and bracelets. The native guides lead the Egyptian traders into the heart of Punt, where they all work together collecting ebony and incense to bring home to Hatshepsut. Hatshepsut brags on her temple walls about all the wonderful things Egypt will enjoy because of her leadeship:  The loading of the ships very heavily with marvels of the country of Punt; all goodly fragrant woods...with ebony and pure ivory, with...eye-cosmetics, with apes, monkeys, dogs and with skins of the southern panther, with natives and their children. Never was brought the like of this for any king who has been scince the beginning. (11) Once back in Egypt the sailors unload. They wrestle with full-grown trees that have been transplanted into baskets and slung over poles for transport. Others shoulder pots and some herd animals. Hatshepsut accepts it all as her due, in the name of Egypt and her godly father Amun. A small figure in the background of one of the last scenes offers incense to the great god Amun. It is Thutmose III. But Thutmose III would not stay in the background forever. His turn on the throne was coming. (12) Just as Hatshepsut had a favorite story that showed us the character of her time in power, so did Thutmose III. His was the battle of Megiddo. Thutmose III's military victories were inscribed on the inner walls of the sanctuary at Karnak. The stories come from the journal entries of an army scribe. The scribe tells us, "I recorded the victories the king won in every land, putting them in writting according to the facts."

  • 日本語訳を!(10)

    お願いします (1) The invaders didn't swoop across Egypt like a tidal wave. At the beginning of the Second Intermediate Peiod, they trickled in―immigrants from the east settling into the delta of northern Egypt. We call the invaders the Hyksos. Soon so many Hyksos had moved into the delta that they had their own king―and that irritated the king of Egypt. This as Egyptian soil, after all. Who did that foreign king think he was ruling in Egypt? No matter how hard the Hyksos tried to blend in, they were still foreigners. It didn't matter if they worshipped Egyptian gods, wore Egyptian clothes, or ate Egyptian food. They were still foreigners. Even their Egyptian name, heqa-khasut, smacked of somewhere else. It meant "chiefs of foreign lands." (2) True, the Hyksos brought with them the hump-backed Zebu cattle that the Egyptians liked so much. And those apples sure were tasty...not to mention the olives. And oh, the sound of the lyre and the lute! Their notes echoed through the chambers of the royal palace. Then there was the vertical loom. For weaving linen it couldn't be beat. The Hyksos' potter's wheels were better, too. But why were the Hyksos hiring scribes to copy Egyptian texts? Stealing Egyptian medical practices, no doubt. And it was totally unacceptable to build Avaris, a walled fortree, and claim it as their capital. (3) Manetho, an Egyptian priest, writes that the Hyksos' king "found a city very favorably situated on the east of the...Nile, and called it Avaris. This place he rebuilt and fortified with massive walls, planting there a garrison of as many as 240,000 heavy-armed men to guard his frontier." Nowhere did the Hyksos' foreignness offend Egyptians as much as at Avaris. Why, those Hyksos dared to live in the same place that they buried their dead. Barbarians!

  • 日本語訳を!

    お願いします (13) Hippopotamus accidentally splattered the beautiful slippers. Rhodopis cleaned them carefully and put them in the sun to dry. "As she was continuing with her chores, the sky darkened and as she looked up, she saw a falcon sweep down, snatch one of her slippers, and fly away." Could that be the god Horus who had taken her shoe? Rhodopis put the one slipper into her tunic and returned to her chores. (14) At the banquet the king was staring out at the crowd. He was thinking he would much rather be out hunting in the desert than hosting a party when "suddenly the falcon swooped down and dropped the rose-red golden slgpper in his lap." Knowing this was a sign from Horus, the king "sent out a decree that all maidens in Egypt must try on the slipper, and the owner of the slipper would be his queen." (15) As you may have now guessed, the king traveled his kingdom by chariot searching high and low. Maidens everywhere tried to squash their wrong-sized feet into the slipper. Then he took to the Nile on his royal barge and one day he docked near the home of Rhodopis. The servant girls who tormented Rhodopis recognized the slipper at once but said nothing. One after another they tried to cram their feet into the golden slipper and one after another they failed. The king saw Rhodopis hiding in the rushes and asked her to come forward and take her turn at the slipper. "She slid her tiny foot into the slipper and then pulled the other from her tunic."  And as if it were a golden rule...the king and Rhodopis lived happily ever after.

  • 日本語訳を! 6-(1)

    お願いします。 (1) In monster movies the Mummy lurches forward, dragging his leg. Ancient Egyptians wouldn't have been scared by this stumbling bag of rags. In fact, they would probably have pointed and laughed, because every Egyptian knew mummies don't lurch. They don't drag their legs. They walk with the grace of an athlete, because in the Field of Reeds, which is where the dead lived, that limp would magically disappear. Deaf in one ear? No problem. Festering wound? No problem. Perfect health is yours in the Field of Reeds. (2) The Egyptians imagined that the Field of Reeds looked like home―only better. A gentle river meandered through fertile fields while munching cows looked on. The cows were fat and happy. They didn't even need to swish their tails, because there were no annoying flies in the Field of Reeds. The fields were always bursting with ripe foods ready to pick. No one was ever sick or hungry, and best of all, no one had to work. (3) The trick was getting in. The Egyptians believed that everyone had three spirits―the Ba, the Ka, and the Akh. Each spirit played a different role when the body died. In its natural state, the Ba―the person's personality―looked like a bird with a miniature version of the dead person's head. After death the Ba lived in the tomb, but was free to come and go as it pleased. The Ba often went to the land of the living where it changed into anything it fancied.

  • 日本語訳を!

    お願いします (14) What really happened when the Hittite army infiltrated the royal camp is muddied by Ramesses' illusions of grandeur. The camp surely was in mass confusion. Many of his soldiers undoubtedly deserted, fleeing for their lives. The Hittite army had a clear advantage. Their ambush and worked. But once they were inside the camp, things began to fall apart for the Hittites. Rather than pressing their advantage and fighting the Egyptians while they were most vulnerable, the Hittites stopped to grab all the riches they were stumbling over. While they were busy plundering, Egyptian reinforcements arrived. The Egyptian divisions joined forces. They charged the Hittites. When it dawned on the Hittites that they were no longer facing disorganized stragglers, but a determined army, they turned and fled, diving into the Orontes River and swimming to the east bank where the bulk of he Hittite army waited. (15) When the dust settled, two of the greatest armies of the ancient world stood facing one another on opposite banks of the river. It seems neither wanted to fight. They had both lost many men. The Hittites no longer could ambush an unsuspecting army. The Egyptians would come at them prepared. And the Egyptians weren't facing some small outpost that offered little resistance. Hittite soldiers were trained and organized. War would mean enormous losses for both sides. And the outcome was by no means certain.

  • 日本語訳をお願いいたします。

    French troops in Chad who had returned from the Kamerun Campaign, prevented a Darfurian withdrawal westwards. Dinar withdrew into the Marra mountains 50 miles (80 km) south of El Fasher and sent envoys to discuss terms but the British believed he prevaricating and ended the talks on 1 August. Internal dissension reduced the force with Dinar to c. 1,000 men and Anglo-Egyptian outposts were pushed out from El Fasher, to the west and south-west after the August rains. A skirmish took place at Dibbis on 13 October and Dinar opened negotiations but was again suspected of bad faith. Dinar fled south-west to Gyuba and a small force was sent in pursuit. At dawn on 6 November, the Anglo-Egyptians attacked in the Affair of Gyuba and Dinar's remaining followers scattered and the body of the Sultan was found 1-mile (1.6 km) from the camp. After the expedition, Darfur was incorporated into Sudan.

  • 日本語訳を!!

    お願いします (10) Aulus Gellius, a Roman lawyer of the second century CE, writes about Vesta's priestesses. A girl chosen to be a Vestal Virgin must...be no younger than six and no older than ten years old.... As soon as a girl is chosen, she is taken to the House of Vesta and handed over to the priests. She immediately leaves her father's control. (11) The chief duty of the Vestal Virgins was to keep Vesta's flame burning. If the flame went out, it meant that one of the Vestal Virgins had been careless in her sacred duties or had broken her vow of chastity. Either way, the Romans believed that the city was in great danger and could be destroyed. They dressed the offending priestess in funeral clothes and carried her to an underground cell, leaving her to die. (12) The earliest Romans were farmers who saw the gods in all the forces of nature. They believed that gods ruled the sun, the moon, and the planets and that gods lived within the trees, in wind, and in rivers. These early, simple beliefs played a part in Rome's later religion as well. But as Rome became more connected with other peoples through war and trade, its religion became more complex. (13) The Romans were as quick to borrow language and inventions. If they encountered a new god that they thought might be useful, they adopted him or her. For example, when the Romans attacked the Etruscan city of Veii in 396 BCE, they begged Juno, their enemy's goddess, to help them in battle. “To you, Juno Regina, who now lives in Veii, I pray that after our victory you will accompany us to our city─soon to be your city─to be received in a temple worthy of your greatness.” When the Romans conquered Veii, they assumed that Juno had helped them. To thank the goddess, they built a temple in her honor in Rome.

  • 日本語訳を!!

    お願いします (27) Antony commanded his slaves to lift him up. Plutarch says that they carried Antony to the tomb, but even then, Cleopatra would not allow the doors to be opened, but she showed herself at a window and let down cords and ropes to the ground. The slaves fastened Antony to these and the queen pulled him up.... Cleopatra... laid him upon a bed... and smeared her face with his blood. She called him her lord and husband and commander. Antony died in the aims of the queen. (28) With Antony dead and Cleopatra defeated, Octavian was the undisputed ruler of the known world. Cleopatra tried to make him fall in love with her. He could have been her third great Roman─but he wasn't interested. Instead, Octavian planned to take Cleopatra, the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt, to Rome as his slave. (29) Rather than be humiliated, Cleopatra chose death. She tried to kill herself, but Octavian's guards caught and stopped her. However, in the end she succeeded with a trick. The queen humbly asked the conqueror to allow her to mourn Antony's death and to give his body a proper farewell. Octavian agreed. (30) Cleopatra ordered a bath to be made ready and when she had bathed, she put on her royal robes and ate a fancy meal. Soon an Egyptian peasant arrived with a basket of figs. The guard inspected it but didn't see the asp, a poisonous snake, hidden beneath the fruit. Cleopatra sent away all of her servants except two women whom she especially trusted and loved. These servants locked the doors of the tomb, obeying the queen's command. Cleopatra had planned to let the asp come upon her when she wasn't looking. But according to one story by Plutarch, as soon as she saw the snake, she grabbed it and pressed it onto her bare arm, inviting a fatal bite.

  • 日本語訳を!!

    お願いします (5) The Roman historian Livy had also written down a different legend about two brothers who were sons of the king. Their names were Numitor and Amulius. When their father the king died, Amulius grabbed the throne and forced Numitor to leave the kingdom. But then Amulius worried that someone might try to overthrow him. What if Numitor's daughter, Rhea Silvia, had children who might try to take the throne? Amulius wasn't taking any chances. He forced Rhea Silvia to join the Vestal Virgins―a group of women who served in the temple of the goddess Vesta. The Romans believed that Vesta wanted the complete attention of her priestesses, so the Vestal Virgins were not allowed to marry or have children. (6) Poor Rhea had no choice but to obey her uncle. But things didn't go according to Amulius's plan. Somehow, despite her protected life among the Vestal Virgins, Rhea became pregnant and gave birth to twins―two strong, handsome boys. She named her sons Romulus and Remus. Amulius was outraged when he heard the news. He ordered his servants to take the twins from their mother's arms nd drown them in the river. Rhea herself was bound and thrown into prison. (7) The servant couldn't bring himself to kill the babies, so he put them into a basket and set it afloat on the river. He was sure that the babies would be carried away and drowned as the king had commanded. But the river was kind and gently landed the basket on solid ground. (8) Although the twins didn't drown, they were still in great danger. If they didn't starve, wild animals might eat them. Miraculously, according to Livy, “a she-wolf, coming down from the... hill to quench her thirst, turned her steps towards the cry of the infants, and nursed them so gently that the keeper of the royal flock found her licking them with her tongue.”