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お願いします A favorite story has Egypt's enemies running in a frenzied retreat from hordes of cats. Cats were loved so much that for a time it was a crime to kill one. The penalty for killing a cat―even by accident―was death. (15) The ancient Egyptian word for dog also comes from the sound it makes―iwiw. But dogs were never revered like cats. It was an insult to be called "the pharaoh's dogs," and there are no images of a dog being petted. Still, leather collars marked with their names such as Brave One, Reliable, and Good Herdsman, prove that their nwners valued them. (Except for that dog named "Useless"?)

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お気に入りの物語には、猫の群れから殺気立って逃げて行くエジプトの敵が登場します。 猫は、とても愛されたので、一時期、猫を殺すことは犯罪でした。 猫殺しの罰は、― たとえ偶然であっても ― 死刑でした。 (15) 犬を表わす古代のエジプト語も、それがたてる音 ― ウーウー が語源です。しかし、犬は猫のように決してあがめられませんでした。 「ファラオの犬」と呼ばれることは侮辱でした、そして、犬がかわいがられている絵はありません。 それでも、「勇敢なもの」「信頼できる」「良き牧夫」のような名前の記された革の首輪は、彼らの飼い主が、彼らを大切にしたということを証明しています。 (「役立たず」と名付けられた犬を除いて?)

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