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この英文の和訳お願いします。

翻訳サイトではわかりにくい部分があったので… 誤字はないと思います。 The first trial interview i had when I started this study was with an old man whose situation suggested the assumption might be right. He was an old widower of seventy-six years of age who lived alone in two rooms on the third floor of a block of tenement flats. His wife had died two years previously and he had no children. He was a very thin, large-boned man with a high-domed forehead and a permanent stoop. His frayed waistcoat and trousers hung in folds. At the time of calling, 5.30 pm, he was having his first meal of the day, a hot-pot of mashed peas and ham washed down with a pint of tea from a large mug. The lining-room was dilapidated, with old black-out curtains covering the windows, crockery placed on newspapers, and piles of old magazines tucked under the chairs. In one corner of the room by an open fireplace (a kitchener) stood a broken meat-safe with scraps of food inside. There was a photo of his wife in her twenties on the mantel-piece tonight with one of a barmaid and a pin-up from a Sunday paper. His wife's coat still hung on a hook on the door and her slippers were tidily placed in the hearth.

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   私がこの調査を始めた最初の仮面接は、この予想が正しいかもしれないと思わせる老人男性であった。     彼は76歳で、ブロック建て貸しアパートの3階の2部屋に一人で住む寡夫だった。妻を2年前に亡くし子どもは居なかった。彼はやせ細った大骨の男で、額は禿げ上がり、前屈みになっていた。    私が訪ねて行ったのは午後5時半で、エンドウ豆とハムの一鍋とそれを(喉に)流し込む大マグの茶、というこの日最初の食事をとっていた。     食事の部屋は、窓は古い灯火管制用のカーテンで覆われ、新聞の上に鍋釜類が置かれ、椅子の下には古い雑誌が積み重なっているというみすぼらしさだった。     部屋の片隅の、むき出しの(キッチナー型の)炉の側には、わずかな食料の入った壊れた肉の容器があった。     その夜のマントルピースには、一人のバーメイドと写っている20代の時の妻の写真と、新聞の日曜版に出ていたピンアップの写真があった。     彼の妻のコートは、まだドアのコート掛けにかかっており、暖炉の中には彼女の部屋履きの靴がきちんと揃えてあった。

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