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お願いします (9) Although Egyptians kept their hair short, they were concerned about what hair they did have. The Ebers Papyrus has recipes for hair care. To strengthen hair, a mixture of crushed donkey teeth and honey is recommended. To prevent graying, it advises applying the blood of a black animal accompanied by a spell that transfers the black from the animal to the hair. For hair loss it says: "Recipe to make the hair of a bald person grow: fat of lion, fat of hippopotamus, fat of crocodile, fat of cat, fat of serpent, and fat of ibex are mixed together and the head of the bald person is anointed therewith." A more straightforward cure for baldness was the application of chopped lettuce o the bald spot. (10) You would think a place where people went out and about with chopped lettuce on their heads would have absolutely no "fashion don'ts," but there were definite no-nos. (11) Fashion don't: Wool or leather in temples or in front of the king. Remember, the gods were often part animal. It was not in good taste to be wearing animal parts to worship. Wool from sheep and goats was considered unclean, so it was never worn next to the skin. Although cloaks were made of wool, they were always worn over linen. (12) Fashhon don't: Wearing shoes outdoors. Always carry your shoes on a journey and put them on when you arrive at your destination. (13) Fashion don't: Facial hair. Beards were considered unclean (remember the fleas and lice) and the mark of a barbarian. The one exception to this fashion don't was the braided fake beard worn by the pharaoh―but then who is going to criticize the pharaoh's fashion sense?

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(9) エジプト人は、彼らの髪を短くしていましたが、彼らは、実際、髪の手入れは気にかけていました。 エーバース・パピルスには、ヘアケアのレシピがあります。 髪を強くするためには、すりつぶしたロバ歯と蜂蜜を混ぜ合わせたものが、推薦されています。白髪になるのを防ぐために、レシピは、黒毛の動物の血を塗り、それと合わせて、その動物から髪へ黒色を移す呪文を使うことを勧めています。 脱毛に対しては、それは、次の様に述べています: 「はげた人の毛を成長させるレシピ: ライオンの脂肪、カバの脂肪、ワニの脂肪、猫の脂肪、ヘビの脂肪、アイベックスの脂肪を混ぜ合わせ、はげた人の頭にそれを塗布します。」はげのためのより直接的な治療は、はげた部分に刻んだレタスをつけることでした。 (10) 人々が、彼らの頭に刻んだレタスをのせて出歩く場所には、全然「ファッションべからず集」等なかったと、あなたは思うでしょう、しかし、確かに「べからず集」は存在しました。 (11) ファッションべからず集: 寺院の中や王の前での羊毛やなめし革。 神が、しばしば、部分的に動物であったことを忘れてはいけません。 礼拝をおこなうために、動物の一部を身に着けることは、良い趣味ではありませんでした。 羊やヤギの羊毛は、不浄であると思われたので、それは、肌に直接触れるように身に着けられることはありませんでした。 外套は、羊毛で出来ていましたが、それらは、常にリネンの上に着られました。 (12) ファッションべからず集: 屋外で靴を履くこと。 常に、旅行にはあなたの靴を携行し、あなたが目的地に到着する時、それらを履きなさい。 (13) ファッションべからず集: 顔のひげ。 あごひげは、不浄であると考えられました(ノミやシラミを思い出して下さい)、そして、野蛮人の特徴だと考えられました。 この「ファッションべからず集」の例外の1つは、ファラオが着ける、編んだ偽のあご髭でした ― しかし、当時、誰がファラオのファッション・センスを批判するでしょうか?

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