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日本語訳を! 7-(5)

お願いします。 (14) When you arrive at the barracks, the smell of fresh baking bread makes your mouth water. Bakers pull loaves out of ovens large enough for you to stand in. You take some bread for yourself and then some fore your grandfather's Ka. You wander to the west side of the pyramid looking for his tomb. Your mother told you that his tomb is a miniature version of King Khufu's mer, except grandfather's is made from mud brick instead of stone. You pass the tomb of a husband and wife who worked on the Great Pyramid. You are one of the fdw who can read bits and pieces of hieroglyphs. What you read makes you quicken your pace past the tomb. It is cursed. "O all people who enter this tomb who will make evil against this tomb and destroy it; may the crocodile be against them on water, and snakes be against them on land; may the hippopotamus be against them on water, the scorpion against them on land." Even though you would never rob a tomb, the curse gives you the creeps, and you watch the ground ahead for snakes and scorpions. (15) Maybe you had better head back. The Overseer of All the King's Works will have assigned your job and you are anxious to see what you will be doing. Most of the farmers have to do all the heavy lifting, but maybe you will be lucky since you can read a little. Maybe you will be assigned a more skilled job. You hope that you can work on one of the boats in one of the boat pits. Wouldn't it be faaulous to be a boat builder for the afterlife? To help build the boat that King Khufu will use to navigate the stars?

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(14) あなたが仮設小屋に到着すると、焼きたてのパンのにおいで、あなたは、よだれが出ます。 パン職人は、あなたが立ったまま入れるほど大きなオーブンから、パンの塊を引き出します。 あなたはあなた自身の分のいくらかのパンと、それから、あなたの祖父のカア(霊魂)のためのいくらかのパンを受け取ります。 あなたは、祖父の墓を探しながら、ぶらぶらとピラミッドの西側に歩いて行きます。 あなたの母は、あなたに、祖父の墓が、石ではなく、日干しレンガでできていること以外、祖父の墓がクフ王の墓のミニチュア版であると話しました。あなたは、大ピラミッドに取り組んだ夫と妻の墓を通り過ぎます。 あなたは、ヒエログリフをほんの少し読むことができる数少ない人々の1人です。 あなたが読んだもののために、あなたは、足取りを速めて、墓を通り過ぎます。それには、呪いの言葉が書かれています。 「おお、この墓に入り、この墓に対して悪をなし、それを破壊するすべての者たちに; 水にありては、ワニが、彼らを狙い、陸にありては、ヘビが、彼らを狙い; 水にありては、カバが、彼らを襲い、陸にありては、サソリが彼らを襲いたまえ。」たとえあなたが墓から決して物を奪わないとしても、呪いはあなたをぞっとさせます、そして、あなたは前方にヘビやサソリがいないか目を凝らします。 (15) 多分、あなたは帰った方がよいでしょう。 「国王の作業の総監督」が、あなたの仕事を割り当てているでしょう、そして、あなたは何をすることになるのか知りたいと不安に思っています。ほとんどの農民は、すべての重い持ち上げ作業をしなければなりません、しかし、もしかすると、あなたは、少し読むことができるので、幸運でしょう。 多分、あなたはより技術を要する仕事を任せられるでしょう。 船工房の1つで船の1隻の作業ができることを、あなたは望みます。 来世のための船大工になることは、素晴らしくないですか? クフ王が星々の間を進むために使うボートを造るのを手伝うのは、素晴らしくないですか?

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