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英文和訳

This attention is welcome. But today’s spike is only part of a broader set of worries. As countries focus on food, they need to distinguish between three classes of problem: structural, temporary and irrelevant. Unfortunately, policymakers have so far paid too much attention to the last of these and not enough to the first. The main reasons for high prices are temporary: drought in Russia and Argentina; floods in Canada and Pakistan; export bans by countries determined to maintain their own supplies, whatever the cost to others; panic buying by importers spooked into restocking their grain reserves. Influences outside agriculture make matters worse: a weaker dollar makes restocking cheaper in local currencies; and dearer oil pushes up the cost of inputs (it takes vast amounts of energy to make nitrogen fertiliser, so fertiliser prices track oil prices). どなたかお願いします

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 この注意は歓迎されます。 しかし、現在の物価の急騰は、より広い一連の懸念の一部に過ぎません。 各国が、食物に焦点を当てるに従って、彼らは、問題の3つの種類を区別する必要があります: 構造的な問題、一時的な問題、無関係な問題、に区別する必要があるのです。 残念なことに、政治家は、これまでのところ、これらのうちの最後のもの(無関係な問題)にあまりにも注意を払い、最初のもの(構造的な問題)には、十分に注意を払っていません。  高価格の主な理由は、一時的なものです: ロシアとアルゼンチンの干ばつ; カナダとパキスタンの洪水; 費用が他国にとっていかなるものになろうとも、自国の供給を維持しようと決意した国々による輸出禁止;恐れを抱いて、彼らの穀物備蓄を補給することに向かった輸入国によるパニック買い、等です。農業以外の影響は、問題をより悪化させます: より弱いドルは、現地通貨での補給をより安くします; そして、より高くなった原油は、製造に必要な材料のコストを引き上げます(窒素肥料を作るには膨大な量のエネルギーが必要なので、肥料価格は、石油価格に追随するのです)。

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