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日本語訳を! 6-(1)

お願いします。 (1) In monster movies the Mummy lurches forward, dragging his leg. Ancient Egyptians wouldn't have been scared by this stumbling bag of rags. In fact, they would probably have pointed and laughed, because every Egyptian knew mummies don't lurch. They don't drag their legs. They walk with the grace of an athlete, because in the Field of Reeds, which is where the dead lived, that limp would magically disappear. Deaf in one ear? No problem. Festering wound? No problem. Perfect health is yours in the Field of Reeds. (2) The Egyptians imagined that the Field of Reeds looked like home―only better. A gentle river meandered through fertile fields while munching cows looked on. The cows were fat and happy. They didn't even need to swish their tails, because there were no annoying flies in the Field of Reeds. The fields were always bursting with ripe foods ready to pick. No one was ever sick or hungry, and best of all, no one had to work. (3) The trick was getting in. The Egyptians believed that everyone had three spirits―the Ba, the Ka, and the Akh. Each spirit played a different role when the body died. In its natural state, the Ba―the person's personality―looked like a bird with a miniature version of the dead person's head. After death the Ba lived in the tomb, but was free to come and go as it pleased. The Ba often went to the land of the living where it changed into anything it fancied.

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(1) 怪物映画の中では、ミイラは、脚を引きずりながら、よろよろと進んできます。 古代のエジプト人は、このつまずきながら進むぼろ袋の様なミイラを怖がらなかったでしょう。 実際、彼らは、おそらく、指をさして笑ったことでしょう、なぜならば、エジプト人は、みんな、ミイラが、よろめきながら歩いたりしない事を知っていたからです。 ミイラは、足を引きずったりしません。 ミイラは、運動選手の様に優美に歩くのです、なぜならば、死者が暮らす所である、葦の草原では、その様な不自由な脚は、魔法の様に、消えてなくなるからでした。 片方の耳が聞こえない? 大丈夫です。 傷が悪化した? 大丈夫です。 申し分のない健康が、葦の草原では、あなたのものになるのです。 (2) エジプト人は、葦の草原は、我が家の様で ― もっと良いだけだと、想像しました。 穏やかな川が、肥沃な畑を蛇行して流れ、草を食む牛たちが、眺めていました。 牛は太って、幸せにしていました。牛たちには、尻尾を振りまわす必要さえありませんでした、と言うのは、葦の草原には、腹立たしいハエがいなかったからです。 その草原には、いつでも摘み取ることのできる熟した食べ物が、常に、あふれていました。誰も、決して、病気になったり、飢えたりすることはありませんでした、そして、何よりも、誰も、働く必要がありませんでした。 (3) トリックが、入って来ました。 エジプト人は、誰もが、バア、カア、アク ― と言う、3つの霊魂を持つと、信じていました。 肉体が、滅びると、それぞれの霊魂が、異なる役割を演じました。 その自然状態では、人の個性である ― バア ―は、死者の頭を小さくした鳥のように見えました。死後、バアは、墓の中で暮らしましたが、好きな時に、自由に、行き来できました。 バアは、それが好むどんなものにでも姿を変えて、生者の土地に、しばしば、行きました。

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  • 日本語訳を! 6-(5)

    お願いします。 (10) If all went in the hall of judgment, the spirits moved on to the final test―and this is where Anubis came in. Anubis had the body of a human and the head of a jackal. One of his official titles was "Lord of the Mummy Wrappings." It was Anubis who administered the final test. On one side of a balance scale, he would place the dead person's heart and, on the other, a feather that symbolized truth and justice. The god Thoth, who was the scribe of the gods, stood by with his pen ready to write down the test results. Would the heart weigh heavy with sin? Or would it balance with truthfulness and justice? If it balanced, the deceased was given a plot of land in the Field of Reeds. But if the balance tipped, the deceased met a very different fate. Near the scales a fierce monster called "The Eater of the Dead" waited―and he was hungry. Anubis fed the Eater of the Dead the hearts of those who failed the final test. Without a heart, the dead person was doomed. Egyptians believed that the three spirits needed their whole body to live in the Field of Reeds. If they were missing any essential part, they would spend eternity as evil spirits haunting the living. Naturally, the living did everything they could to preserve the body.

  • 日本語訳を! 6-(2)

    お願いします。 (4) The Ka, on the other hand, was stuck in the tomb. It had to stay with the body. In order to survive, the Ka needed to eat and drink. Friends and family of the dead person would bring offerings to the tomb for the Ka. They even brought clothing for it. The Ka needed the corpse, or the spirit would perish―and if it perished, good-bye Field of Reeds. In an emergency situation, the Ka could use a statue that looked like the deceased as a fallback body. Or it could even occupy a picture of the deceased on the tomb wall. Pharaohs paid artisans to recreate their images everywhere. A forgotten pharaoh was doomed. No sense taking chances. (5) The Akh was the spirit that represented immortality. It could shine with the stars at night and the sun in the day, or live forever in the Field of Reeds. The three spirits' main responsibility was to make sure that the dead person lived forever. Their job was to gain entrance to the Field of Reeds. And here's where it got tricky, because entering the Field of Reeds was as challenging as any video game. (6) When a person died, his or her spirit took off toward the setting sun and entered the dangerous Underworld. After a long journey the spirits arrived at a labyrinth of gates and doors. The gatekeepers and the magical doors would quiz the spirits. "I will not let xou through me," says the jamb of the door, "unless you tell me my name." "I will not open for you," says the bolt of the door, "unless you tell me my name." (7) There were many names to memorize in order to open the doors, names such as "She Who Licks Her Calves" and "He Who Cuts Up An Opponent" and "Toe of His Mother." Call one tormentor by the wrong name and you were condemned to haunt your own grave and wander the desert moaning through eternity.

  • 日本語訳を! 6-(6)

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  • 日本語訳を! 6-(3)

    お願いします。 (8) With so much to lose, the Egyptians came up with a cheat sheet. During the Old Kingdom, only pharaohs could get into the Field of Reeds. Not wanting to risk forgetting a name or a spell, the kings had the answers to all the questions, along with all the magic spells, buried with them. We call the book of spells from the Old Kingdom the Pyramid Texts. During the Middle Kingdom, when the Field of Reeds was open to everyone, the spell were conveniently written on the sides of the coffins. We call those the Coffin Texts. In the New Kingdom the spells were written on scrolls and buried with the body. The words written during the New Kingdom are now known as the Book of the Dead. The Egyptians thought of every possible unpleasantness and wrote spells to protect against it. They even had a spell that prevented them from having to stand on their head and eat feces―or step in some. "What I detest is feces, and I will not eat it... and I will not touch it with my toes." Obviously the ancients weren't taking chances on anything less than a perfect afterlife.

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  • 日本語訳を! 4-(1)

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  • 日本語訳を! 5-(7)

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